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This year’s theme, “Celebrating 40 Years of Progressive Leadership,” acknowledges TASH’s 40 years of generating change within the disability community and anticipates a brighter, more inclusive future for people with disabilities in all aspects of life. Each year, the TASH Conference impacts the disability field by connecting attendees to innovative information and resources, facilitating connections between stakeholders within the disability movement, and helping attendees reignite their passion for an inclusive world.

We encourage you to explore this website, connect with other attendees, and build your personalized schedule. You can also download the mobile app version of the website by visiting the App Store and Google Play and searching for "TASH 2015". 

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Poster Presentations [clear filter]
Wednesday, December 2
 

4:30pm

Poster Presentations
Poster presentations capture information about a particular topic in the form of printed text and graphics. Presentations are displayed on 36"x48" boards on easels during a two-hour period. Poster presentations will take place on Wednesday, with Best Poster Awards following on Friday.

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Voices from the Classroom: Thoughts about the Future of Special Education
Limited Capacity seats available

This study used descriptive statistics, rating and ranking procedures and responses to open-ended survey questions to examine predictions of 137 Special Education teachers who provide educational support to students with moderate to severe disabilities about 13 concepts that influence the future of Special Education in America. The study expanded on a previous research project which surveyed 447 general educators and members of the public. This study created a picture of 21st century Special Education as an effort to secure funding for programs to balancing the academic requirements with the individual needs of the child and keeping up with emerging technologies.

Participants will be able to:
1. Identify the key concepts that the Special Education teachers identified as the most influential for the future of education.
2. Recognize and discuss with others potential concerns for the future based on the results of the open-ended survey questions.
3. Affirm the current data and share in pairs or small groups to brainstorm other possible concerns for the future of Special Education.

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Instruction partnerships: Advocates and Allies
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will include two university faculty members- (allies) and one self-advocate to discuss bringing the first person experience into on-line courses in a variety of ways. The efforts have included mentoring & increasing the presence of the self-advocate in courses. Some strategies included: in small short video's and discussion boards related to the content; topical presentations created by self advocate and jointly edited by the self-advocate and the faculty allies The presentation will include examples. Summarizing with projected plans to grow these efforts to increase the first person voice in teacher preparation.

Learning Objectives: 

1) Participants will become familiar with the process for including and promoting first person voice in on-line courses
2) Participants will become familiar with the strategies that support the self-advocate and increase participation.
3) Participants will learn the results of the impact on student learning.
4) Participants will learn about the personal experiences and comments of the students.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Hinkle

Stephen Hinkle

Self Advocate, Self Employed
Stephen is a self advocate, person with autism and a current online facilitator for Lesley University. Stephen is a graduate of Northern Arizona University with a masters degree in special education disability policy. Stephen obtained his undergraduate degree from San Diego State University in Computer Science. Stephen is an international speaker has spoke in 24 states, plus Australia over the last 16 years. Stephen's audiences have included... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

A review of inclusive comprehensive treatment models for young children with ASD.
Limited Capacity seats available

Unfortunately, young children with ASD often receive segregated services, partly due to the still lingering “readiness” and “behavior control limitation” myths (Strain, Schwartz, & Barton, 2011). There are several comprehensive treatment models (CTMs) that incorporate evidence-based practices to offer economical services related to the core characteristics of ASD, but reviews have not focused on inclusive CTMs (National Research Council, 2001; Odom, Boyd, Hall & Hume, 2010; Rogers & Vismara, 2008). This session describes a review of studies of inclusive CTMs for young children with ASD published over 17 years that outlines common components, study quality and effectiveness.

Learning Objectives: 

a) Identify inclusive comprehensive treatment models (CTMs) for young children (toddlers and preschoolers) with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
b) Describe components of effective inclusive CTMs for young children with ASD
c) Summarize the outcomes for children with ASD who are enrolled in these programs
d) Discuss the role attendees can take to adapt and implement strategies embedded within CTMs to improve outcomes for young children with ASD within inclusive settings.

Speakers
CR

Cecelia Ribuffo

Graduate Assistant and Technical Assistance Specialist, CEEDAR Center


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Accessing General Education Science Content through Content Area Literacy Instruction
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will share findings from a single-case multiple baseline research study targeting science concept learning for secondary students with significant disabilities. Specifically, this study examined the effectiveness of systematic literacy instruction leveraging content area literacy strategies before, during, and after reading an adapted expository science text on student comprehension. Student intervention results as well as findings from social validity interviews with students and teachers will be shared. Research in this area will help establish the evidence base needed to support the continued academic instruction and learning in content aligned with the general education curriculum of students with significant disabilities
.
Learning Objectives: 

1. Identify strategies to implement before, during, and after reading expository text to facilitate comprehension: Specifically, participants will learn about ways to structure systematic content area literacy instruction. They will identify pre-reading strategies (pre-teaching key vocabulary), during reading strategies (graphic organizer and comprehension monitoring), and post-reading strategies (main idea and summary statement) that can be implemented in research and practice.

2. Summarize the need for systematic, explicit content-area instruction: Participants will review the intervention results and the social validity interview data and recognize the importance of a systematic approach to instruction in the academic content areas, making connections regarding the application of academic content areas to post-secondary life.

3. Identify ways to support teachers in implementing such instruction: Throughout the presentation, participants will be invited to participate in a discussion regarding the challenges to implementing content-area literacy instruction within applied, inclusive settings for students with significant disabilities. They will be invited to identify potential ways to address concerns teachers or families may have with such instruction. Furthermore, as a group, we will brainstorm ways to facilitate inclusive content-area literacy instruction across a variety of content areas. 

Speakers
CR

Carly Roberts

Assistant Professor, University of Washington


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Advocacy Across the LifeCourse
Limited Capacity seats available

Members of the DC Supporting Families Community of Practice will describe how we have used Person-Centered Thinking tools and skills to reframe our conversation from what deficits people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) have to what people like and admire about our family members and how to best support them. We will describe how we have used Positive Personal Profiles to identify areas for systemic advocacy and build shared responsibility for the levels of change that must occur to advance our system of supports for people with and their families, throughout a person's life.

Learning Objectives:

1. Understand the work of the “National Community of Practice for Supporting People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities throughout the Lifespan" with a focus on systems change efforts in the District of Columbia. D.C. has convene a team of family members, people with IDD, and other government and community partners, to develop and implement an action plan to shape policies and programs that support families. 

2. Learn about how the DC Supporting Families Community of Practice uses person-centered thinking tools and skills as a vehicle for envisioning success, and for understanding and building a shared responsibility for the levels of change that must occur to advance our system of supports.

3. Describe families' visions for how we can better support them and their loved ones with IDD. 

4. Summarize how people with IDD, family members, non-profits, and government agencies in D.C. used what they had learned from working collectively on Positive Personal Profiles to begin making changes at all levels– in thinking, in practice, in policy, and in rules and legislation – to better support people with IDD and their families throughout the lifespan. 

5. Share the Advocacy Across the LifeCourse guide, created by members of the DC Supporting Families Community of Practice to support systems change efforts by people with IDD and their families.

Speakers
avatar for Erin Leveton

Erin Leveton

Director, State Office of Disability Adminstration, Department on Disability Services
Erin Leveton is the Program Manager of the State Office of Disability Administration at the District of Columbia Department on Disability Services, supporting the agency in policy and legislative affairs, program development, stakeholder relations, and helping DDS to accelerate gains in performance and best practice in areas such as Employment First, Person Centered Thinking, community integration, and self-determination/ supported... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Aligning Math Instruction to Common Core Standards for Students with Significant Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

States that have adopted Common Core standards have asked teachers to hold their students to higher expectations. In math, standards address both content knowledge and applying knowledge to solve problems in daily life. For teachers who support students with significant cognitive disabilities, instruction may focus on alternate achievement standards but must continue to provide connections to daily life. This study examined effects of an instructional package aligned to middle school Common Core math standards for students with significant disabilities. Data suggest a functional relationship between teacher use of the package and students’ ability to solve problems independently.

Learning Objectives: 

1) Identify three features of instruction that support access to grade-aligned math curriculum
2) Identify contexts in which students can apply grade-aligned problem solving skills in everyday life
3) Create a story-based math problem that applies grade-aligned math skills to a problem of daily life 

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Amazing Life Changing Experiences: Transition programs aren?t just for those with disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

While a plethora of research on transition education exists, much less researched are "soft" outcomes. Within our program, some of the most profound outcomes have been organic; mediated by context. Being located on a college, many authentic and age-appropriate experiences involving college and transition students have emerged unscripted. We draw upon narratives of pre-service teachers' transformative understandings of transition and youth with significant disabilities.

Learning Objectives:
• This presentation will discuss the many positive outcomes that a transition program has on a university campus and university student life.
• Participants will gain some insight in the “soft” yet profoundly moving outcomes that CPP participants and their University peers mutually enjoy.
• The presenters will raise critical questions about participation and integration of persons with significantly disabling conditions.
• This presentation will explore the benefits of age-appropriate programming and help participants gain a better understanding of ways to implement this type of program in their community and/or local college campus.

Speakers
AW

Amy Williamson

CrossingPoints Coordinator, The University of Alabama


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Assessing Integration of Home and Community-Based Services Settings
Limited Capacity seats available

New regulations restrict Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services funding to settings that are truly "community-based." But how are states determining which settings are, and are not, community-based? This talk will provide a general overview of the new rule and discuss assessment methods that states have used to determine whether settings are offering adequate opportunities to exercise self-determination and participate in community life. The presentation will involve discussion of the benefits and drawbacks of different assessment methods and information on how professionals can get involved.

Learning Objectives: 

1. Understand the general effect of the HCBS settings rule
2. Locate their state's transition plan
3. Identify possible issues with how their states plan to assess compliance with the settings rule
4. Advocate for better compliance with the new rule

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Assistive Technology Solutions for Aging Successfully with a disability
Limited Capacity seats available

There are many obstacles that individuals with Developmental Disabilities (DD) encounter daily as they age that can hinder them from remaining at home and age successfully in communities of their choice. This talk will present what’s new in Assistive Technology (AT) and the Aging in Place movement as we explore where we were, where we are, and perhaps, where we are going. Real-life examples of AT that assists with fall detection and prevention, environmental control, memory, healthy-living, hearing, seeing, communication, and computer access will be shared. 

Learning Objectives: 

1. Describe 3 AT solutions for aging in place. 
2. Identify 3 apps to assist with successful aging.
3. List 3 resources to stay current with aging resources and AT trends. 

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Bereavement preparation, experiences and needs
Limited Capacity seats available

As adults with IDD age, they face the death of parents and other loved ones. Grief can affect all aspects of their lives. It challenges resilience and coping skills. Advocates for people with IDD must recognize and respond to the need for more information and support around death/grief in the lives of people with IDD/their families. This researcher conducted national online surveys of self-advocates and guardians focused on death preparation, and bereavement experiences for adults with IDD. The goal is to build curriculum and supports so that those with IDD can journey through expected losses with evidence-based information and supports.

Learning Objectives: 

  • describe negative impacts of lack of death and grief education and support
  • identify actions/resources to support adults with IDD in death preparation
  • identify actions/resources to support adults with IDD in dealing with grief



Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Celebrating 30 years of Family Leadership and Support
Limited Capacity seats available

The Family Support Institute (FSI) is a provincial non-profit society. FSI supports 10,000 families each year. This support stems mainly from our volunteer network of over 250 volunteers who support families in BC by sharing experiences and expertise, connecting families with each other, guiding families to supports and services in their regions, and facilitating training and educational sessions. FSI is unique in Canada. FSI believes that families are the experts and the strongest voice when it comes to their children. We support all families, with children of all ages and all disabilities. We have been operating successfully for 30 years.

Learning Objectives: 

  • Learn the successful steps to building a grass roots, family driven support organization.
  • Learn what hurdles we have faced as a provincial society over the past 30 years, and how policy was developed and practice was informed as a result. 
  • Learn the challenges and benefits of a volunteer driven organization, and what strategies are most effective for informing public policy and community development.
  • Learn how we define diversity and how we embrace inclusion and family support, with unique approaches to collaboration with government and service providers that complements the work we do provincially.

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Collaborative Advocacy in the Autism Community: An Inclusive Framework for Social Change
Limited Capacity seats available

This panel presentation features personal perspectives of Autistic Adults and Parents and highlights their ongoing collaborative projects through social media, and other means, to challenge negative stigma about Autism, and to promote social justice and human rights. They will share their framework for collaboration, a model that respects and honours differences in communication/processing and recognizes that the future of neurologically diverse society is dependent on the development of inclusive practices.

Learning Objectives:

• identify strategies to support collaborative work in advocacy approaches between parents and Autistic adults. 

• list effective strategies that honour diverse processing and communication styles and foster a relationship of trust

• discuss and share examples of collaborative advocacy projects created through the use of social media platforms and identify a minimum of three information platforms or sites which amplify the voices of Autistic adults

• explain the positive impact of the online relationships in building community and in supporting Autistic people in self-determining roles that impact public policy and opinion. 

• summarize the importance of including Autistic adults in conversations around autism and the importance of reframing Autism so that is not seen through the stigmatized lens of tragedy.

Speakers
avatar for Kassiane Sibley

Kassiane Sibley

Bouncer, Parenting Autistic Children with Love & Acceptance
I'm a vintage 1982 Autistic & epileptic activist. I've been standing for Autistic rights since before it was cool.


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Communication: Using topic boards to stimulate discussion and the sharing of ideas
Limited Capacity seats available

TASH is celebrating 40 years of progressive leadership because it has “a vision of a world in which people with disabilities are included and fully participating members of their communities…and will be realized when…All individuals have a way to communicate and their communities are flexible in communicating in alternate ways that support full participation”. In support of TASH’s vision, this poster session will introduce aided language modeling and topic boards as a way to increase the sophistication of a person’s communication. These strategies promote and support one’s full participation in conversations and the sharing of ideas. The concept of aided language modeling will be introduced through demonstration and examples. The most salient features of a topic board needed to broaden a student’s opportunities to share ideas, comment and participate in discussions will displayed.

Speakers
avatar for Lou-Ann Land

Lou-Ann Land

University of Kentucky


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Confessions from post-secondary education: If we knew then what we know now
Limited Capacity seats available

After 5 years of wonderful student success stories, ACE-IT in College at Virginia Commonwealth University is ready to share directly some challenges and stumbling blocks encountered in implementing an inclusive post-secondary education program for students with intellectual disabilities. While some of the things that initially did not work turned into opportunities, there remain other student issues and service provision complexities that we did not anticipate and may deal differently with in the future. It is hoped that what has been learned by one of the first TPSID projects will be useful for other developing post-secondary programs serving students with disabilities.

Learning Objectives: 

1) identify barriers and issues that can occur when implementing an inclusive post-secondary education program with students with intellectual disabilities;
2) learn creative solutions that have been used to successfully deal with those issues;
3) increase opportunities for success within their own post-secondary education programs through the application of strategies learned during the session.

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Content-based Strategies and Resources for the Progressive Leader
Limited Capacity seats available

This session provides resources and strategies for parents and teachers in the areas of collaboration, advocacy, inclusion, culturally responsive instruction and UDL/ differentiated instruction. The results from the study describe how teacher candidates created an easy to access document/files for future use in the classroom workplace that support inclusion efforts. Lessons learned will be shared and examples of the content-based strategies and resources will be provided at this presentation.

Learning Objectives: 
1) Identify resources and strategies for collaborating with educators, parents, and agencies in accordance with IDEIA
2) Promote service, advocacy, and leadership in the field of special education
3) Recognize co - teaching models that focus on the inclusion needs of individuals with exceptionalities
4) Celebrate and foster inclusion, diversity, independence and multiculturalism 


Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Daycare Center Directors' Attitude toward Inclusion of Children with Disabilities in Korea
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this study was to explore the attitude of the daycare center directors toward inclusion of young children with disabilities in Korea. The subjectivity study method (Q-methodology) was used for this research. The Q-statements of this study were 37 units. P-samples as subjects of this research were 36 daycare center directors. As the results of this research, the attitude of daycare center directors toward inclusion of children with disabilities was structured in three types. The result of this research will be helpful for the Korea government to plan the policy about inclusion of young children with disabilities.

Although the importance of inclusive education for young children with disabilities has been emphasized for long time, most of general daycare center have denied the inclusion of young children with disabilities in Korea. Lots of young children with disabilities are included in the daycare centers for children with disabilities which are separated from general children. One of the reason is the clause of the law relation to inclusion is not mandatory but just recommendation. The other reason is the myths about inclusion of young children with disabilities; that is, general children will follow the behavior problem of children with disabilities and can’t speak as like children with disabilities. To increase of inclusion of young children with disabilities in daycare center, the attitude of directors is important. From this research, we knew the attitude type of daycare center directors toward inclusion of young children with disabilities in Korea. Depends on their attitude type inclusion of young children with disabilities, it will be need to approach to increase and improvement of inclusion in daycare center. Learning objectives of this study are the awareness on the importance of attitude type analysis and introduction about the subjective study.


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Decision-Making Processes of Beginning Special Education Teachers Including Students with Severe Challenges
Limited Capacity seats available

Twelve beginning special education teachers from 12 cultural diverse school districts participated in a year-long action research project defining their decision-making processes. Results indicated wide variability in teacher roles, and common elements reflecting collaboration, student priorities, IEP goals, and curriculum and instruction. Comparisons with teacher preparation standards indicated significant discrepancies that will be explored. Implications for promoting future inclusive practices for students with severe challenges are discussed.

Learning Objectives: 

• Identify common decision-making themes of 12 special education teachers given their varied roles and responsibilities
• Describe how teachers’ decision-making priorities reflected for students with severe challenges are discrepant from standards of performances expected using teacher training competencies in severe special needs.
• Share and clarify decision-making models used by research participants in contrast to session participant models reflected by their content map drawings.

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Educator ratings of importance and intensity of supports provided in inclusive settings
Limited Capacity seats available

Application of a social-ecological model to students with disabilities in schools calls for supports to be provided that increase access to inclusive settings; requiring educators to identify, arrange, and implement supports. Yet, little is known about educator perceptions of importance of different types of supports. Therefore, an investigation of the relative priority educators’ ascribed to different types of supports provided in inclusive settings was investigated.

Learning Objectives:

As a result of this session, participants will be able to describe the social-ecological approach to understanding individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities (ID/DD) and the importance of this approach in identifying the support needs of children with ID/DD. Based on study findings, participants will be able to describe educator perceptions of the importance and intensity of different types of supports provided to students with disabilities as a method to increasing their engagement in regulation education classrooms. Lastly, participants will be able to describe implications and future directions for research with respect to providing supports to students with ID/DD in order to increase participation and bridge the gap between personal competency and environmental demands.


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Effective strategies for teaching reading skills to English Language Learners with ID
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation aligns with this year’s theme by “Continuing 40 Years of Progressive Leadership” and examines a population that future research needs to address. There is little empirical research available for students with intellectual disability who may also be English Language Learners. Identifying effective research-based interventions can positively help this underserved, diverse population. This presentation will examine the past and current literature base as well as provide classroom examples of inclusive strategies for this population of students that are used by public school teachers.

Learning Objectives:

After this session, participants will be able to cite research for effective intervention when working with students who are English Language Learners (ELL) and have a moderate or severe Intellectual Disability (ID). 
After this session, participants will be able to explain the need for future research for students who are English Language Learners and who have a moderate or severe Intellectual Disability. 
After this session, participants will be able to discuss specific research to conduct involving students with moderate or severe ID who are also identified as ELL. 
After this session, participants will leave with real life inclusive strategies to use with students with ID who are ELLs. This material will be presented by current teachers in a large urban school district.



Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Effects of embedded instruction on functional skills on students with ID
Limited Capacity seats available

This study uses a single subject alternating treatment design to compare Embedded Instruction (EI) and Discrete Trial Training (DTT) on functional skills for students with Intellectual Disabilities. The DTT intervention will teach the functional skills in its traditional format (Lovaas, 1987) across 10 trials, in a segregated setting. The EI intervention will differ by embedding the functional skills in a multimedia literacy story created on an iPad, in an inclusive setting. During the EI intervention each skill will also be embedded for a total of 10 trials. All intervention sessions will be randomized across students and outcomes will be compared.

Learning Objectives:

1. This presentation will be relevant to practitioners and researchers that serve students with Intellectual Disabilities. 
2. The specific practices of DTT and EI will be introduced and data will be reported to show student performance.
3. Participants will be introduced to the current literature in DTT, EI, as well as shared stories with students with Intellectual Disabilities. 
4. The presentation will show professionals how to use EI when teaching functional skills through an enhanced individualized multimedia literacy story. This presentation will demonstrate how to embed discrete trials into a literacy activity on the iPad. 
5. The generalization of the findings from the study will be discussed regarding the ability to replicate (or teach) the intervention to the families of the participants. 



Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Embedding RIRD strategy in instructional settings to reduce vocal stereotypy
Limited Capacity seats available

Students who display vocal stereotypy often have difficulty participating in social activities and experience limited social inclusion (Lanovaz & Sladeczek, 2012). An intervention that has been demonstrated to quickly reduce moderate to high levels of vocal stereotypy in children with ASD and other intellectual disabilities is response interruption and redirection (RIRD). For effective implementation, a three step procedure is used (1) gaining the student’s attention at the onset of vocal stereotypy, (2) asking a question or placing a demand for a verbal response, and (3) reinforcing attempts at an appropriate verbal response. Implementation and troubleshooting guidelines will be shared.

Learning Objectives: 

a) describe the implementation steps for using the response interruption and redirection (RIRD) procedures to reduce vocal stereotypy 
b) plan and prepare for effective use of the RIRD strategy during group instruction or social settings
c) create a monitoring plan to ensure that the intervention is reducing vocal stereotypy and increasing functional communication
d) revise implementation plan using troubleshooting options if the intervention is not effective as initially designed

Speakers
JW

Jenny Wells

Associate Professor, University of Hawaii at Manoa


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Evidence Based Practices in Action: Perspectives from Teachers in the Field
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation highlights teachers', who were chosen for an Office of Special Education Programs Teacher preparation grant, experiences in implementing evidence based practices. Specifically, the presenters share their experiences of applying evidence based practices in their classrooms with the goal to increase inclusion for students with significant disabilities. The presenters will share the strategies that they have found most successful and discuss how to implement these strategies to promote inclusion.

Learning Objectives:

1) Be able to identify 3-5 evidence based practices that address a variety of learning needs of students with significant disabilities. 

2) Generate 2-3 ideas to increase inclusive practices by implementing evidence based practices for people with significant disabilities.

3) Share their own experiences in implementing evidence based practices in the classroom to improve inclusive practices for persons with significant disabilities. 

To do this, the presenters, who are teachers selected as part of an OSEP funded teacher preparation grant, will discuss how they have applied their knowledge of evidenced based practices to improve the inclusive practices for persons with significant disabilities at their schools. Under the guidance of their faculty mentors, several teachers will provide information about a variety of evidence based practices, how they implemented the practices within their school setting (pre-k to 21) and any obstacles they faced as well as how they overcame each obstacle. Topics may include the following: (a) self-determination, (b) family involvement, (c) person centered planning, (d) teaching academic skills (e) positive behavioral supports, and (f) data based decision making (Browder, Wakeman, et al., 2007; Jimenez, Mims, & Browder, 2012; McDonnell & Copeland, 2011; Westling & Fox, 2009; Wood, Fowler, Uphold, & Test, 2005). The presenters will also share the outcomes of their implementation of strategies. 

This session is unique as it encourages engagement between attendees and several practitioners with demonstrated leadership skills who are passionate about increasing evidenced based inclusive practices to promote change within their school setting for students with significant disabilities. The teachers who will be presenting work with students from culturally, linguistically and economically diverse backgrounds. Individualized attendee needs will be considered throughout the presentation to ensure full participation by all. Information will be presented through visual and auditory means. 




Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Evidence-based Practices for Students with Severe Disabilities: The CEEDAR Center Report
Limited Capacity seats available

Educating students with severe disabilities is a complex process that spans many domains. Traditionally, research has examined how to teach students valuable life skills. More recent research has addressed the need to apply explicit and systematic instruction to teach academic content and processes as well. This report represents a synthesis of evidence-based and research-based practices for teaching students with severe disabilities a full range of skills. Specifically, this presentation will describe the body of research for how to teach, what to teach, and how to support the full educational experience for students with severe disabilities.

Learning Objectives:

a) Identify the mission and resources of the CEEDAR Center
b) Summarize the evidence base practices for how to teach students with severe disabilities
c) Describe best practices for what to teach students with severe disabilities.
d) Indicate optimal supports for improving learning of students with severe disabilities.
e) Discuss how the Evidence Based Practices for Students with Severe Disabilities Innovation Configuration is used to evaluate current teacher preparation and professional development (PD) by determining the extent to which these EBPs are taught, observed, and applied within teacher preparation and PD programs

Speakers
CR

Cecelia Ribuffo

Graduate Assistant and Technical Assistance Specialist, CEEDAR Center
avatar for Julie Thompson

Julie Thompson

Assistant Professor of Special Education, Texas A&M University
Julie L. Thompson, PhD, BCBA, is an Assistant Professor at Texas A&M University. Julie’s research examines explicit instruction procedures to teach academic skills to ethnically and linguistically diverse minimally vocal-verbal children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in public school settings. She is particularly interested in group instructional arrangements and technology delivered-instruction.
avatar for Leah Wood

Leah Wood

Assistant Professor of SPED, Cal Poly


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Evidence-Based Practices for Teaching Mathematics to Students with Moderate and Severe Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

This year's conference theme, “Celebrating 40 Years of Progressive Leadership”, exudes excitement for a bright future for people with disabilities. For example, in the area of teaching, researchers have identified numerous evidence-based practices to help guide educators to make informed decisions about the instructional practices they use to teach. In this spirit, this poster presentation describes the results of a comprehensive review of the literature for teaching mathematics to students with moderate and severe disabilities. Included studies were reviewed for quality using established quality indicators and high quality research was then used to determine any evidence-based practices.

Learning Objectives: 

• Explain the process for determining evidence-based practices
• Name two evidence-based practices for teaching mathematics to students with moderate and severe disabilities
• Describe the changes in mathematics instruction in the past 9 years

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Examining Appropriate Participation and Performance of U.S. Students on Alternate Assessment
Limited Capacity seats available

Appropriate participation of students with disabilities in standardized assessments is a value championed by TASH and other advocacy groups. Students with disabilities are required to participate in standardized assessment but little guidance exists on how students are selected for participation in alternate assessment. In this presentation, we examine national data on the participation rates of students with disabilities.

Learning Objectives: 

1. Identify and discuss issues regarding the participation of students with disabilities on standardized and alternate assessments.
2. Compare/contrast participation rates related to student and state characteristics.


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Experiences of Elementary Students with IEP Participation
Limited Capacity seats available

Much of the focus to date on students participating in their IEP meetings has focused on preparation of high school students in the context of transition planning. However elementary and middle school students stand to benefit from IEP participation. This session introduces a call for change in IEP participation to include students in their educational planning as early as the fourth grade. This session will present research that explored factors that motivated fourth- and fifth-grade students with high-incidence disabilities to participate in their IEP meetings and factors that supported and impeded their participation.

Learning Objectives:

(1) Teachers will learn factors that motivated fourth- and fifth-graders with high-incidence disabilities to participate in their IEP meetings.
(2) Teachers will learn factors that supported and impeded IEP participation for fourth- and fifth-graders with high-incidence disabilities.
(3) Teachers will learn autonomy-supportive teaching strategies that facilitate more active student IEP participation.
(4) Administrators will learn ways to support teachers (through training, professional development, and provision of instructional materials) in their efforts to prepare elementary students for IEP participation.

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Extending a Higher Education-School Collaboration into the Community: The Big Read Project
Limited Capacity seats available

The “Big Read” is an annual community public library event that promotes discussion and special events around a selected central text. Integral to this project is the cooperation of local school districts to promote use of the selected text in English Language Arts Instruction. The “Big Read” Project will describe a process by which pre-service teacher candidates created adapted text summaries of the selected text for middle and high school students who need additional support to access grade-appropriate text in order to promote participation of all local students in their community library’s “Big Read” event.

Learning Objectives: 

1) List 5 steps in creating an adapted text summaries to accompany the study of adult fiction and non-fiction text
2) Create an adapted text summary of a short passage from a novel recommended for use in middle and high school ELA classes
3) Identify 3 additional means of providing access to a novel for students who need support with text-based learning

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Family first line charge in the empowerment of persons with severe disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

The role of family in the support of persons with severe disablement, their encouragement and care with inadvertently help in propelling those with these severe disablement to face the larger society.

Learning Objectives: 

Participants will learn and value the role the family provides in the early life of PWDs especially those with severe disablement .

Family support to help PWDs understand what they will face in the larger society and thereby better prepare them for the future that is so uncertain.


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Fidelity versus Flexibility: Implementing Scientific Practices in Inclusive Science Classrooms
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will provide results from an alternating treatment design study in which students received science instruction in high fidelity and flexible conditions in an inclusive classroom. Students with and without disabilities demonstrated an increase in academic and social responses and scientific practices in the high fidelity condition.

Learning Objectives: 

1. Participants will be able to design effective procedures for implementing an inclusive, standards-based science lesson with high fidelity.
2. Participants will summarize ways to increase self-efficacy for students with and without disabilities who participate in the described science lessons. 
3. Participants will be able to use provided artifacts in similar lessons, including science lab notebooks, student questionnaires, and data sheets. 

Speakers
avatar for Leah Wood

Leah Wood

Assistant Professor of SPED, Cal Poly


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Fostering Home School Collaboration: Online Professional Development for Rural Teachers
Limited Capacity seats available

Technology has reshaped professional development by increasing access to information, enabling sustained follow-up efforts, and fostering teacher reflection and collaboration. Drawing on theoretical models of parent involvement and an ethic of caring, this study examined the perceptions and attitudes of educators and principals toward collaborating with parents of children with disabilities. This inquiry utilized a digital documentary and online curriculum for teachers’ professional development. Results indicate that teachers who participated in online professional development showed increased recognition of the importance of collaborating with families. Principals saw potential for growth and recognized the need to provide professional development for their teachers.

Learning Objectives:

1. Administrators and researchers will have the opportunity to learn about the outcomes for a rural school district, which participated in a study using this approach to professional development. 
2. Educators and administrators involved in professional development are provided information about an innovative approach so that they may be better able to support teachers in building collaborative partnerships with parents. Access to the online documentary and accompanying curriculum is available for educational purposes to schools districts interested in delivering professional development.
3. Parents and their families are provided the opportunity to recognize the power of their stories about their experiences of raising a child with a disability. The stories contained in the digital documentary are told by families tell about the joys as well as the dynamics of raising a child with a disability. From parents, educators can learn to broaden their perspective by listening to families’ stories and in doing so, appreciate the need to form empathy and value the importance of communication and collaboration with parents.



Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Function-Based Intervention in Inclusive School Settings: A Meta-Analysis
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this meta-analysis was to summarize single case intervention research in which function-based intervention was applied within inclusive settings to address challenging behaviors of students with disabilities. We will present (a) a descriptive summary of the research included in the review, (b) overall effect of function-based intervention, (c) study characteristics that moderated intervention effect, and (d) implications for practice and research.

Learning Objectives: 

The primary goal of this presentation is to describe meta-analytic research. Specifically, we will describe the study methods and the final results, including (a) a descriptive summary of the research in which function-based interventions were applied within inclusive settings to address challenging behavior, (b) overall effect of function-based intervention, and (c) study characteristics that moderated intervention effect. Also, we will describe implications for practice and future research and facilitate discussion with poster session attendees. 
As a result of this session, poster session attendees will be able to 
(a) describe the methods and results of the study, 
(b) discuss the implications for practice and future research, and 
(c) apply learned knowledge to their own practice or research. 

Speakers
avatar for Yun-Ching Chung

Yun-Ching Chung

Assistant Professor, Illinois State University
Yun-Ching Chung is an assistant professor in the department of special education at Illinois State University. Her research interests include peer interactions, inclusion outcomes of students who use augmentative and alternative communication, and paraprofessional facilitation.
avatar for Virginia Walker

Virginia Walker

Assistant Professor, Illinois State University


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Future Educational Leaders' Perceived Knowledge of Supporting Students with Severe Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this qualitative study is to determine the level of knowledge of school personnel - including administrators, counselors, and general educators/curriculum experts - regarding the services necessary to support students with low-incidence disabilities - specifically severe disabilities - and to determine the additional knowledge and skills required by these educational leaders in order to meet not only the legal mandate but also the social justice goals of IDEA.

Learning Objectives: 

After this session, participants will be able to:
a. discuss at least three barriers that graduate students report in their knowledge in supporting students with severe disabilities and their families,
b. describe at least two to three solutions for each barrier that could be addressed at either the university and/or district level,
c. identify 'next steps' in using this knowledge to inform practice


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Generalization of comprehension across content areas for students with ASD
Limited Capacity seats available

In order to include students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in the general classroom, teachers need to consider the unique challenges experienced by individuals with ASD. Students with ASD often struggle with text comprehension as well as generalization. This session will consider the text comprehension research for students with ASD. Participants will be provided with examples of how to implement strategies to increase comprehension during core content instruction. Participants will learn techniques for programming for effective generalization across people, settings and materials, with an emphasis on teaching individuals with ASD to access the general classroom and increase independence.

Learning Objectives: 

1. Participants will learn effective text comprehension strategies across core content areas for students with ASD.
2. Participants will learn how to plan for generalization of text comprehension skills, particularly generalization to the general classroom.
3. Participants will learn strategies for adapting text-based content area instruction for learners with ASD in the inclusive setting.



Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Getting to Know Us-National Raise & RSA Parent Centers
Limited Capacity seats available

It was called Getting to know us - National RAISE and RSA Parent Centers
Opportunity to meet with the newly funded RSA National Parent Technical Assistance Center and representatives from the 7 funded Parent centers to discuss their projects and plans to supports families and youth as they navigate systems critical to successful transition. As a result of this session participants will be able to: Meet with the newly funded RSA National Parent Technical Assistance Center and representatives from the 7 funded Parent centers to discuss their projects and plans to supports families and youth as they navigate systems critical to successful transition.
Opportunities to discuss collaboration and sharing of resources both traditional and non-traditional.
Move the conversation forward for youth and family toward true independence; what does it take to get there?

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Historical, Legal and Cultural frameworks of parental involvement for students with disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation is to provide audience a variety of perspectives about the involvement of families of students with disabilities. Historical, legal, and cultural frameworks as well as trends of parental involvement in the United States will be provided in a chronological order. The information about national parent advocacy organizations will also be provided. A family member will be telling stories about an immigrant family of a son with Autism and how parents involve in their son's special education in the United States.

Learning Objectives: 

1. The attendees will be able to understand the historical, legal, and cultural frameworks and trends of parental involvement in the United States.
2. The attendees will be able to know the historical major issues of parent involvement.
3. The attendees will be able to obtain the information about national parent advocacy organizations. 
4. The attendees will be able to listen to a journey of an Asian immigrant family about advocating inclusion for their son in a public school system. 


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

How to Take a Leadership Role in Your Child's IEP Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

For too long, parents have been intimidated by Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings. Therefore, parents do not always get to fully advocate for their children's needs. As parents of students with IEPs, educators of and advocates for children with significant disabilities; the presenters have been personally challenged to ensure their own effective parent participation in IEP meetings. Presenters will provide advance preparation strategies to help families assume an active role in the IEP discussion. Participants will use strategies in role play and other interactive activities to develop leadership skills for future meetings.

Learning Objectives: 

By the end of this session, participants will be able to:
a. Articulate goals they have for their student’s education and/or transition
b. Discuss strategies to address goals in multiple settings
c. Effectively use language to demonstrate their understanding
d. Direct conversation to address their questions or points of concern


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Impacts of Employment First Policy on Vocational Rehabilitation Outcomes
Limited Capacity seats available

This paper uses state-level Rehabilitation Services Administration Case Service Report (RSA-911) data in the context of a multi-period difference-in-difference model to assess the impact of state-level Employment First policy adoption on short-term labor market outcomes.

Learning Objectives: 

The presentation will result in 1) a better understanding of average impacts from Employment First policy implementation on VR outcomes; and 2) an increased understanding of relevant methods for analyzing multi-period policy adoption data.

Speakers
avatar for Leanne Giordono

Leanne Giordono

PhD Student, Oregon State University


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Including learners with LID: Best practices in teacher training and professional development
Limited Capacity seats available

A shift from medical model to social model has impacted pre-service teacher preparation and in-service teacher professional development on inclusion. A framework of increasing knowledge of disability policies and laws, increasing contact with individuals with disabilities, and building confidence in use of inclusive instructional practices will be discussed. In light of continuing progress, this presentation will discuss ways in which teacher training and professional development can continue moving forward to creating more inclusive learning environments for all learners.

Learning Objectives: 

1. Learners will identify current issues and challenges in inclusive education
2. Learners will identify 3-5 best practices for inclusive education in teacher training
3. Learners will identify 3-5 best practices for inclusive education for in-service professional development
4. Learners will identify 2-3 supports for implementing inclusive education in a variety of contexts


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Inclusion: A Question of Practice, Stance, Values and Culture
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will present a systematic, mixed-methods phenomenological research study that examined the phenomenon of inclusion in a large, urban public school system. The study explored the lived experiences of teachers who identify as Champions of Inclusion (Henderson, 2007). The study centered on the experiences and perspectives of these teachers in regard to inclusion as a civil rights and social justice imperative, their perspective on the current culture of their organization as a facilitator or inhibitor of inclusion, and their views on how their organization might capitalize on their commitment and competency by utilizing them as mechanisms for transformative change.

Learning Objectives:

- Deconstruct how inclusion “happens” 

- Identify constructs that go into the “making of inclusion”

- Gain insight into how organizations can mitigate resistance to inclusion by using its own power (policy and structures), as well as its built-in capacity (champions of inclusion), to turn the discourse on inclusion from being exclusively about disability, to one of inclusive education as foundational to democracy, education reform and social justice, and the belief that each individual is valued and should belong

- Gain insight into what educational organizations can do to help schools overcome resistance to inclusion and overcome some of the stumbling blocks to creating inclusive classrooms
Gain insight into the practices, values and policies that cultivate, reinforce and sustain inclusive culture at the organizational level    
- Gain insight into how educational organizations can take the lead to enact the shift from a “medical model” of disability that legitimizes the segregated education of individuals with disabilities, to a “social model” that rejects the focus on impairments and limitations and seeks to illuminate policies and practices that marginalize some students 

Speakers
avatar for June Sellers

June Sellers

National Urban Special Education Leadership Initiative, University of Central Florida
June is a dedicated leader and tireless educator/advocate in the field of Urban Special Education and is honored to be a doctoral scholar representing the National Urban Special Education Leadership Initiative (NUSELI). Her professional goal is to improve the educational outcomes of students with disabilities and those from under-served populations by relentlessly working toward continuous improvement and innovation in urban public school... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Intellectual Disability and Sexuality: The Missing Link
Limited Capacity seats available

There is a void when it comes to the voices of people labeled as having intellectual disabilities regarding their own sexuality; their perspectives have not been described. This research study explores the existing literature that discusses the perspectives of others and then studies the perspectives and experiences of people who have intellectual disabilities about sexuality. Individuals labeled as having intellectual disabilities can, and should, be a part of these discussions about their own sexuality. We must continue to progress so that individuals labeled as having disabilities may be more fully included in all aspects of life.

Learning Objectives:

1. As a result of this session participants will be able to gain a better understanding of the perspectives of people with disabilities in regard to their own sexuality. 
2. Participants will be challenged to think about ways in which supports for people with disabilities may be improved as a result of the findings of this study. 
3. Participants will be able to think more openly about sexuality and disability, and learn the importance of including people with disabilities in conversations directly impacting their lives. 
4. Participants will be able to identify further needs within the field of intellectual disability and sexuality, and discuss ways in which this research can and should be continued.

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Interdisciplinary Collaboration for Students Who Require Continuous 1:1 Nursing Supports in School
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will present preliminary findings on a qualitative study that investigated special educators’, school nurses’, and 1:1 nurses’ perceptions on interdisciplinary collaboration for students with complex health care needs who require continuous 1:1 nursing supports in school. A discussion on promoting student dignity, independence, and social inclusion through interdisciplinary collaboration will be highlighted.

Learning Objectives: 

1. Understand the unique educational needs of students who require continuous 1:1 nursing supports.
2. Understand the legal requirements for schools to provide continuous 1:1 nursing supports when needed to attend school safely. 
3. Understand the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration between educators and health care professionals for students with complex health care needs, and what factors are unique to students who require continuous 1:1 nursing supports.
4. Understand existing practices in interdisciplinary collaboration between special educators, school nurses, and 1:1 nurses for students who require continuous 1:1 nursing supports at school. 
5. Understand effective or needed practices in interdisciplinary collaboration to promote student dignity, independence, and social inclusion for students who require continuous 1:1 nursing supports at school.

Speakers
SK

Stacy K Dymond

Professor | Department of Special Education | University of Illinois


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Investigating Literacy Learning Opportunities for Adults with ID/DD in a Community Setting
Limited Capacity seats available

Literacy skills support self-determination, lifelong learning, expanded opportunities for fulfilling work and careers, and meaningful interactions within the community. Adults with Intellectual Disability and Developmental Disabilities (ID/DD) have traditionally had limited opportunities to continue acquiring literacy skills. This case study investigated the impact of embedded professional development on the literacy learning opportunities of individuals with ID/DD. Before and after the intervention, we interviewed service providers and individuals with ID/DD, conducted a literacy dig of the work environment, and investigated priorities represented in Individual Service Plans (ISPs). We discuss implications for improving literacy learning opportunities and make recommendations for future research.

Learning Objectives: 

• Articulate the importance of literacy across the lifespan
• Make connections between challenges related to literacy learning in adult services and K-12 education
• Understand the importance of developing policies, procedures, and programs that communicate literacy learning as a priority for adults with ID/DD
• Think about the challenges present in building capacity and sustaining implementation of literacy learning programs in community work settings.

Speakers
JM

Jessica McCord

Educational Consultant, ACERI Partners


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Labeling in Special Education
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Learning The Access Codes To Life: A Person with a disability's Perspective
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Literacy Instruction and Access to the General Curriculum: A Teacher Survey
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
CR

Carly Roberts

Assistant Professor, University of Washington


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

May I Pet Your Dog?: Service Dog versus Therapy Dog
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Mindfulness Yoga and children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation explains how mindfulness yoga when in cooperated in classroom for students with autism can assist them to perform better. Autism is a complex neurological disorder that greatly effects quality of life, impairs communication skills, social interaction in severe cases. Many children engage in repetitive and stereotyped behavior. Yoga mindfulness when performed and practiced with consistency can provide benefits to health, mental strength, well-being, emotional stability and self-regulation among individuals with autism. Individuals with ASD undergo lot of stress and portray behavior challenges. Mindfulness yoga as an emerging self-care therapy helps improve effective relationships, focusing and understand inner experiences. 

Benefits of presentation: • This presentation will inform educators, therapists, parents, guardians on benefits of yoga for children in autism spectrum disorder. • Inform individuals present in the conference the five areas of practice that include balanced step: asanas, pranayama, deep relaxation techniques, poses or postures and music therapy. • The presentation will also inform individuals on neuro-biological aspect of yoga  • The presentation will also discuss emerging neuro-science studies.   

Speakers
avatar for Sujata Norman

Sujata Norman

SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHER, ALBERTVILLE HIGH SCHOOL
I have been a teacher for nearly 25 years. I have taught in three continents and five countries. I have been handling students with behavioral issues and reading on mindfulness and yoga. I have conducted a pilot study using a specific mindfulness based intervention and will be conducting my PhD dissertation study in few months.


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Mothers' Narrative on the Life with Children with Disabilities in Multi-Cultural Families
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Moving through barriers: Examining transition experiences of culturally diverse students with disabilities and their families
Limited Capacity seats available

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

National Survey of Special Educators: Communication Use for Students with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Parent/Guardian Preconceptions of I/DD Student Participation in Post-High School Programs
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Partnering for Success
Limited Capacity seats available


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Peer interactions and relationships of high school students who use AAC
Limited Capacity seats available

Social interactions and peer relationships have been valued as an important inclusion outcome for students with significant disabilities. However, little is known about whether and how students with severe disabilities, especially those who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC; e.g., communication devices, signs, pictures), interact with peers without disabilities. We conducted observations to record naturally-occurring peer interactions of high school students who use AAC in inclusive classrooms. In addition, parents and teachers completed a questionnaire to share information on students’ social networks. We will share preliminary results and discuss recommendations for educational teams who support students who use AAC.

Speakers
avatar for Yun-Ching Chung

Yun-Ching Chung

Assistant Professor, Illinois State University
Yun-Ching Chung is an assistant professor in the department of special education at Illinois State University. Her research interests include peer interactions, inclusion outcomes of students who use augmentative and alternative communication, and paraprofessional facilitation.


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Progressive Leadership in Action
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Retention of Independent Living Skills in I/DD Population
Limited Capacity seats available


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Social Validity in Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
CO

Conrad Oh-Young

Doctoral Student, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Doctoral Student in the UNLV College of Education Department of Educational & Clinical Studies.


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Special Delivery Diagnosis of a Disability
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Shyanne Richardson

Shyanne Richardson

Owner/ Director, The Sidewalk Center


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Students with Disabilities Create Models for Money Management Utilizing Software
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Survey of Early Career Researchers in Severe Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Ruppar

Andrea Ruppar

Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison
avatar for Virginia Walker

Virginia Walker

Assistant Professor, Illinois State University


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Teacher candidates’ understanding of autism – Designing courses that address the knowledge gaps
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
MS

Mary Sheppard

Rowan University


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Teacher Implemented Functional Communication Training: A Review of the Literature
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Teacher's experience in inclusion class of elementary school in Korea
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Teachers' Decisions in Curriculum for Secondary Students with Severe Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Teaching Early Numeracy Skills to Students with Severe Multiple Disabilities and Complex Communication Needs
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Teaching Early Numeracy Skills to Students with Severe Multiple Disabilities and Complex Communication Needs
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Teaching/learning within circles of co-practice: Mentors, interns, and university coaches addressing ableism
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Technology integration and student engagement: Rural teachers' perspectives
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Alex Hollingshead

Alex Hollingshead

Assistant Professor, University of Idaho
Dr. Aleksandra Hollingshead is an assistant professor of special education at the University of Idaho in Moscow, ID. She was born and raised in Poland and moved to the United States in 2003. Upon earning a Master degree in special education, Dr. Hollingshead worked as a special education teacher with students with autism and severe behaviors. She earned her doctorate degree from the University of Cincinnati in 2013. Dr. Hollingshead’s... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

The ADA applies to parenting!
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

The Power of Words
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Christine Vosseller

Christine Vosseller

Growing Kids Therapy Center
Christie is a Human Resources practitioner by trade with extensive credentials in both private and public sector. She earned her undergraduate degree in Communication from Hollins University and a Master of Arts in Contemporary Communication from Notre Dame of Maryland University. Christie is proud to volunteer with AEA and support practitioners, parents and students who will be speaking on topics of education, advocacy and RPM at this... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

The Relationship Between Student's Skills, Goals, and State Standards: A Systematic Review
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Alison Zagona

Alison Zagona

Doctoral Candidate, University of Arizona
I am a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Arizona in Tucson, AZ. As a former special education teacher, I am passionate about including students with significant disabilities in all aspects of the educational experience. My research is focused on instructional, social, and behavior supports for students with significant disabilities in the general education classroom, teacher preparation to implement these supports, and collaboration with... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Thinking Outside The IEP Boxes: How-to Create Solutions With Possibility Thinking
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Transition Services for Students with Significant Support Needs: Creating Model Programs
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Transitioning out of the family home: supports for families
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
LL

Laura Lee Wright

Ministry Consultant, Bethesda Lutheran Communities
I am a person who defines myself as the daughter of the King of kings. Born with Cerebral Palsy, living with challenges is just away of life. The last 15 years, I have been able to look at both faith and disability. I have developed church programs, consulted with churches, have a passion for teens and an organization called Young Life Capernaum. Finally, I am passionate about developing persons with varying abilities into leaders- throughout the... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Transitioning to college: Advocacy for inclusive higher education learning
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Trends and Outcomes in Inclusive Higher Education: Data from National Coordinating Center
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Cate Weir

Cate Weir

Project Coordinator, Think College
inclusive postsecondary education for students with intellectual disabilities



Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Using Peer Supports in Work Based Settings for Students with Significant Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Lindsay Athamanah

Lindsay Athamanah

Doctoral Student, University of Illinois at Chicago


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Using Shared Stories and Systematic Prompting to Promote Comprehension of Workplace Texts
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Using UDL to Promote the Inclusion of Individuals with ID in College
Limited Capacity seats available


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Whose the Expert? Self-Advocates Teach Attorneys Person-Centered Thinking
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Erin Leveton

Erin Leveton

Director, State Office of Disability Adminstration, Department on Disability Services
Erin Leveton is the Program Manager of the State Office of Disability Administration at the District of Columbia Department on Disability Services, supporting the agency in policy and legislative affairs, program development, stakeholder relations, and helping DDS to accelerate gains in performance and best practice in areas such as Employment First, Person Centered Thinking, community integration, and self-determination/ supported... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201