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This year’s theme, “Celebrating 40 Years of Progressive Leadership,” acknowledges TASH’s 40 years of generating change within the disability community and anticipates a brighter, more inclusive future for people with disabilities in all aspects of life. Each year, the TASH Conference impacts the disability field by connecting attendees to innovative information and resources, facilitating connections between stakeholders within the disability movement, and helping attendees reignite their passion for an inclusive world.

We encourage you to explore this website, connect with other attendees, and build your personalized schedule. You can also download the mobile app version of the website by visiting the App Store and Google Play and searching for "TASH 2015". 

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Tuesday, December 1
 

12:00pm

TASH Board of Directors Meeting
Moderators
avatar for Ralph Edwards

Ralph Edwards

Elected to be TASH President is a great honor. The passion and commitment of members coupled with research based advocacy is inspiring. Let's discuss ways to support TASH's continued leadership in promoting social justice and human rights.
avatar for Barb Trader

Barb Trader

Executive Director, TASH
Barb Trader is Executive Director of TASH, a progressive advocacy organization that advances inclusion and human rights of people with significant disabilities and complex needs. In her role at TASH, Barb leads APRAIS (Alliance for Prevention of Restraint, Aversive Intervention and Seclusion), a 32-member alliance of national non-profits with a mission to eliminate aversive interventions. She serves on the Board and is treasurer of the... Read More →

Tuesday December 1, 2015 12:00pm - 6:00pm
Pearl 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201
 
Wednesday, December 2
 

7:30am

About the Film Festival
Limited Capacity seats available

In addition to the hundreds of great presentations with the latest advancement in the field of inclusion, you will also experience the fine art of film making at the 2015 TASH Annual Conference.
This year’s annual conference will host a film festival featuring the nominees for the TASH Positive Images in the Media award. This award honors print, film, or other forms of media renditions that promote positive images of people with disabilities. The films at the festival will portray people with disabilities and their lives accurately with recognition of the complexities of being human.
As an attendee, you will have a chance to view the films and participate in conversations with the creators of the films. The TASH Positive Images in the Media award winner will receive special recognition during one of the General Sessions. For screening times, visit: http://tash.org/2015FilmFestival

We hope you can join us!

Wednesday December 2, 2015 7:30am - Friday December 4, 2015 3:30pm
TBA

7:59am

About Wednesday Workshops
Wednesday workshops are short-course workshops are delivered by teams of presenters around a particular topic in a scheduled room for 3 hours to 5 hours. Workshops allow attendees to dive into popular topics in more depth. Workshops will take place on Wednesday.

Wednesday December 2, 2015 7:59am - 4:30pm
TBA

8:00am

This Is What Inclusion Looks Like
Limited Capacity filling up

More Information Coming Soon
Please Come Back!

Tentative Agenda:

o 8:00- 8:10 AM- Welcome Remarks- by Angela Jarvis-Holland 
o 8:10- 9:00 AM- Making Measurable Progress Towards More Inclusive Communities- Kristen Uliasz, Natalie Holdren
o 9:00-9:50 AM  Brainstorming Session!: Dyadic Interviewing & Rethinking How We Do Inclusive Research- Kate Caldwell, Tia Nelis
o 9:50- 10:40 AM Accessible Advocacy: Young Adults Use Adapted Technology for Social Change. Daniel Stickney, Benjamin Lamoso
o 10:40- 11:30 AM Inclusive Research Methods Workshop. Dora Raymaker, Mary Oschwald, Christina Nicolaidis, Katherine McDonald, Elesia Ashkenazy 
o 11:30 - 12:30 PM BREAK
o 12:30-1:30 PM-Ensuring Family Involvement in Their Child’s Education: Family-Guided Planning and e-Portfolio. Patricia Sheehey, Mary Jo Noonan, Patrick Sheehey
o 1:30-2:20 PM Self-understanding, Self-advocacy, and Self-determination: Cultivating Foundational Skills in Autistic Youth. Leah Kelley, Harrison Scott
o 2:20-4:10 We All Belong -- Making it a reality- Michael Bailey, Amber Smock, Angela Jarvis-Holland, AbbyBraithwaite
o 4:10- 4:30 PM Closing Remarks by Jenny Stonemeier



Speakers
avatar for Natalie Holdren

Natalie Holdren

TEP Faculty & Doctoral Student, UC Santa Barbara
Inclusive Education, Cultural & Linguistic Competence, Evidence-Based Practices, Literacy Instruction
avatar for Leah Kelley

Leah Kelley

I am a doctoral student, educator, activist, writer, and parent of an Autistic teen. | I am interested in talking about the Neurodiversity paradigm; Universal Design; Social Model of Disability; Inclusion; Boycott Autism Speaks; Parenting Autistic Children with Love and Acceptance (PACLA); The importance of amplifying the voices and perspectives of Autistic people to inform our practice as parents and educators.
MJ

Mary Jo Noonan

Professor, University of Hawaii at Manoa
avatar for Dora Raymaker

Dora Raymaker

Research Associate, Portland State University
Dora Raymaker, PhD is an autistic self-advocate and research associate at the Portland State University's Regional Research Institute. She also co-directs the Academic Autistic Spectrum Partnership in Research and Education (AASPIRE, http://aaspire.org), a community-campus partnership conducting research to improve the lives of adults on the autism spectrum. Her research interests include community-engaged practices, accessible technology... Read More →
avatar for Daniel  Stickney

Daniel Stickney

Public Speaker/ Advocate, The Ability Awarness Guy
I am a public speaker and advocate for individuals who live with disabilities. I will complete my transition program in December and begin working as an advocate full time. My passion is educating the public about disability awareness, specifically wheelchair awareness. I also enjoy jet skiing and snow skiing.
avatar for Jenny  Stonemeier

Jenny Stonemeier

Director of Education Policy, TASH
ask me about: | TASH | TASH Conference | Membership | EducationEquity | Inclusive Education | Education Policy | gluten free cooking


Wednesday December 2, 2015 8:00am - 4:30pm
Salon I 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

8:20am

TASH Doctoral Students & Beginning Special Education Faculty Workshop
Limited Capacity full

This Wednesday session is meant for you! Come meet each other and nationally-recognized professors and researchers with successful records as college and university faculty who are willing to share their strategies with you. The groups will discuss the following topics.

 Agenda:

8:20- 8:50 AM
    Establishing a Professional Identity
    Vicki Knight, Jacki Anderson
  • Establishing a professional identity and getting through a doctoral program; negotiating to have experiences specifically related to severe disabilities & maximizing collaboration with seasoned faculty nationally; surviving when sole low incidence faculty member; begin to establish network between participants and presenters for specific tasks/activities. 

8:50- 9:50 AM

    Grants & External Funding
    Mary Morningstar, Bethany McKissick
  • Grantsmanship; seeking external funding for research, personnel preparation, systems change efforts, conference attendance; “Centers” versus projects; early career funding.

    Teacher Preparation
    Donna Lehr, Stacy Dymond
  • Preservice teacher preparation program development; constructing and implementing effective courses & a course sequence. 

9:50 -10:50 AM

Developing and sustaining a research agenda.
 
Fred Spooner, Vicki Knight

10:50-11:50 
    Service & Professional Development
    Jacki Anderson
  • Interfacing of “service” & professional development activities (i.e., workshops; technical assistance) for building a community of services & support network that supports effective personnel prep. 

  • Publishing
    Susan Copeland, Marty Agran, Fred Spooner, Stacy Dymond
  • Publishing articles in RPSD (& other journals), chapters, & books. 

11:50-12:20
    Promotion & Tenure
    Fredda Brown, Fred Spooner
  • Promotion and tenure issues; juggling all the required and desired tasks and activities for your professional identity (e.g., publish or perish; teaching or service in the community); packaging yourself for open faculty positions (i.e., beyond severe disabilities). 

Moderators
avatar for Andrea Ruppar

Andrea Ruppar

Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison
avatar for Virginia Walker

Virginia Walker

Assistant Professor, Illinois State University

Speakers
avatar for Martin Agran

Martin Agran

University of Wyoming
Dr. Martin Agran is a nationally recognized researcher in the area of special education. He is a professor and former department head in the Department of Special Education at the University of Wyoming. Additionally, he served as a professor in the Special Education Departments at Utah State University and the University of Northern Iowa (where he also served as department head), respectively. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois... Read More →
SK

Stacy K Dymond

Professor | Department of Special Education | University of Illinois
avatar for Mary E. Morningstar

Mary E. Morningstar

Dr. Mary E. Morningstar is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Kansas and Director of the Transition Coalition, which offers online, hybrid and in-person professional development and resources for secondary special educators and transition practitioners. Dr. Morningstar also is the Program Director for the Low Incidence teacher education program which trains teachers of students with significant... Read More →
avatar for Fred Spooner

Fred Spooner

Professor, UNC Charlotte
Fred Spooner (Ph.D., University of Florida) is a Professor in the Department of Special Education, and Child Development and Principal Investigator on a Personnel Preparation Project involving distance delivery technologies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and Co-Principal Investigator on a U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences (IES), Project to teach students with moderate/severe intellectual disability... Read More →
avatar for Donald Taylor

Donald Taylor

Manager, Membership, TASH
I am a member of the TASH staff. Mostly I'm going to be occupied running the conference. When I get to attend conference sessions, it will primarily be pertaining to my staff work on membership and chapters. Otherwise I will be staffing the TASH table. If you need help with anything, just ask and I will do what I can. If you want to know about membership or chapters, come by the table (next to registration) and ask.


Wednesday December 2, 2015 8:20am - 12:20pm
Willamette & Columbia 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

8:20am

Common Core and Assessment, Building Capacity for Inclusion
Limited Capacity seats available

Tentative Agenda (Please come back soon for more information)



  • 8:20- 8:30 Welcome Introductions



  • 8:30- 9:20 AM- Meaningful Involvement in the Core Curriculum: All really means all! Kathy Gee.



  • 9:20- 10:10 AM Pathways to Academic and Physical Inclusion through Evidence-Based Instructional Strategies. Caryn Allison.






  • 10:10-11:00 AM Teaching Meaningful Mathematics while Still Aligning to the Common Core State Standards. Julie Thompson.

  • 11:00-11:30- Break



  • 11:30-12:20 Keys for Positive Behavior Supports, Inclusive Education with Parent, Teacher, Administrator Tools. Patti McVay.



  • 12:20-1:10 Promoting Access to Common Core Mathematics in Inclusive Settings. Jenny Root, Fred Spooner.



  • 1:10-2:00 Progressive Leadership: Moving Students Forward with Instruction and Assessment Aligned for ALL. Sharon Leonard.



  • 2:00-2:10 Q&A 






Speakers
avatar for Sharon L. Leonard

Sharon L. Leonard

Educational Consultant, PaTTAN
Effective instruction and achievement aligned to grade level standards for students with the most complex needs, preferably in a general education setting
avatar for Patti McVay

Patti McVay

Down Syndrome Unites - Championing All Disabilities
Our team - parent, general education teacher, administrator - will be sharing keys for positive behavior supports with a student centered perspective, proven to help teams focus on a student's voice instead of labels and terminology. Come and join us for tools that you can use the very next day.
avatar for Jenny Root

Jenny Root

University of North Carolina Charlottev
Jenny Root is the Snyder Fellow and a doctoral candidate in special education at the University of North Carolina Charlotte. Her research uses applied behavior analysis to evaluate the effects of technology-aided instruction and learning strategies to provide general curriculum access to students with autism and other developmental disabilities. Jenny is a former school-wide PBIS facilitator and classroom teacher of students with autism and... Read More →
avatar for Fred Spooner

Fred Spooner

Professor, UNC Charlotte
Fred Spooner (Ph.D., University of Florida) is a Professor in the Department of Special Education, and Child Development and Principal Investigator on a Personnel Preparation Project involving distance delivery technologies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and Co-Principal Investigator on a U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences (IES), Project to teach students with moderate/severe intellectual disability... Read More →
avatar for Julie Thompson

Julie Thompson

Assistant Professor of Special Education, Texas A&M University
Julie L. Thompson, PhD, BCBA, is an Assistant Professor at Texas A&M University. Julie’s research examines explicit instruction procedures to teach academic skills to ethnically and linguistically diverse minimally vocal-verbal children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in public school settings. She is particularly interested in group instructional arrangements and technology delivered-instruction.


Wednesday December 2, 2015 8:20am - 2:10pm
Mt Hood 1414 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

8:20am

Advancing Employment First: Bridging the Future from the Workshop to the Workplace
Limited Capacity filling up

 Agenda

8:20- 8:30 Welcome Introductions

8:30- 9:30 AM- Creating a Bridge from Workshops to Community Employment. Michael  Callahan, Therese  Fimian, Vickie  Calder

9:30- 10:30 AM Shifting Away from Sheltered Workshops: Building Peer to Peer Supports. Ryley Newport, Ross Ryan, Justin Connolly, Gabrielle Guedon , Kaaren Londahl

10:30-11:30 AM From Workshop to Work: Video Case Studies of the Journey through Discovery. Julie Christensen, Gillian Young-Miller, Jeanne Stewart, Kayt Davidson, Tammy Reynolds.

11:30-12:00 - Break 

12:00-1:00- Overview of State of Washington’s Employment Outcomes for People with Developmental Disabilities. Brian Nichols, Branda Matson, Megan Burr

1:00-2:00 Advancing Employment First through Technology & Engaging Employers. Jim  Swain, Gina  Price

2:00-2:30-  Q&A and Reflections 




Speakers
avatar for Megan Burr

Megan Burr

Employment and Day Program Coordinator, Developmental Disabilities Administration
• Responsible for coordinating the development, implementation, and monitoring of processes used by DDA staff in the administration of the DDA Employment and Day programs; | • Manages DDA Employment and Day Program Quality Assurance Database used to compile, track and analyze Employment and Day Program data from assessments, employment plans and six month employment performance reports. This data is used to evaluate the effectiveness of... Read More →
avatar for Michael Callahan

Michael Callahan

President, Marc Gold & Associates
Customized Employment, Discovery, Job Development, Systematic Instruction, consulting, certification, inclusive community planning
avatar for Julie Christensen

Julie Christensen

Director of Employment Programs, Strong Center for Developmental Disabilities
Julie J. Christensen, PhD, LMSW, is the Director of Employment Programs at Strong Center for Developmental Disabilities (SCDD), a University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD), at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Dr. Christensen is the Project Director for the New York State (NYS) Partnerships in Employment Systems Change initiative, a Project of National Significance funded by the Administration for... Read More →
avatar for Ryley Newport

Ryley Newport

Advocacy Coordinator, Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities


Wednesday December 2, 2015 8:20am - 3:30pm
Pearl 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

8:30am

Chapter Leadership Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

TASH’s growing network of existing and developing chapters meet to share experiences, address challenges and build skills as leaders in grassroots advocacy. We will be exploring and developing action plans to address state and local issues. We will also be sharing information specific to chapter needs/interests. Individuals interested in starting a chapter in their state/region/province are welcome to attend.

Agenda
8:30 AM- 8:50 AM
Welcome, Opening Round, Introductions | Shirley Rodriguez, Donald Taylor

8:50 AM- 9:20 AM
Chapter Board Recruitment Presentation and Exercise | Shirley Rodriguez

9:20 AM- 9:50 AM
Chapter Fundraising and Development | Dawn Brown

9:50 AM-10:20 AM
Introduction to Communication Outreach | Bethany Alvare

10:20 AM-10:30 AM
Break

10:30 AM-10:45 AM
TASH President of the Board Addresses Chapters | Ralph Edwards

10:45 AM-11:05 AM
Barb as Outgoing Executive Director Addresses Chapters | Barb Trader

11:05 AM-11:15 AM
Chapter’s Good-Bye to Barb | Everyone

11:15 AM-12:10 PM
TBA

12:10 PM-12:50 PM
Tutorial on How Chapter Leaders Monitor and Administer their TASH Chapter Webpage

12:50 PM- 1:00 PM
Closing Round | Shirley Rodriguez, Donald Taylor



Moderators
avatar for Bethany Alvare

Bethany Alvare

Communications Manager, TASH
Bethany Alvaré is advocacy communications manager at TASH, a national disability advocacy organization. Alvaré manages all internal and external communications at TASH, developing advocacy campaigns, promoting conferences, and driving membership. She maintains relationships with many vendors, including media, publishing companies, and partnering organizations. Other responsibilities include graphic design, website maintenance, and content... Read More →
avatar for Dawn Brown

Dawn Brown

Development Director, TASH
Dawn Brown serves as the Director of Development for TASH. Dawn is responsible for all aspects of fund development for TASH, including securing support of the conference through sponsors, writing grants, promoting annual giving among the membership and building community relationships. Dawn has over 20 years’ experience in education, fund development and business development, and much of her career has been entrepreneurial, including... Read More →
avatar for Donald Taylor

Donald Taylor

Manager, Membership, TASH
I am a member of the TASH staff. Mostly I'm going to be occupied running the conference. When I get to attend conference sessions, it will primarily be pertaining to my staff work on membership and chapters. Otherwise I will be staffing the TASH table. If you need help with anything, just ask and I will do what I can. If you want to know about membership or chapters, come by the table (next to registration) and ask.

Wednesday December 2, 2015 8:30am - 1:20pm
Salon C 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

8:30am

Communication: Opening Access to Self Determination
Limited Capacity seats available

More Information Coming Soon
Please Come Back!

Tentative Agenda:
o 8:30- 8:40 Welcome Introductions
o 8:40- 9:40 AM- AAC Intervention: The 3T Project. Samuel Sennott, Reny Ferrari, Eric Sanders
o 9:40- 10:40 AM- Self-advocates as Leaders in the Training of Communication Partners. Pascal Cheng, Harvey Lavoy, Tracy Thresher
o 10:40-11:10 AM Break
o 11:10 AM-12:10 PM Darkness to Light. Melia Roberts, Jean Trainor, Nathan Trainor
o 12:10-1:10 PM Coaching communication partners on effective communicative access for individuals with autism. Fernanda Orsati, Ashlyn Smith, Casey Woodfield, Katherine Vroman, Christy Ashby, John Hussman
o 1:10-1:30 Q&A and Reflections

Speakers
avatar for Samuel Sennott

Samuel Sennott

Assistant Professor, Universal Design Lab/ Portland State University
Samuel Sennott, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Special Education at Portland State University (PSU). Dr. Sennott is the founder of the new Universal Design Lab at PSU, which is focused on innovative research, teaching, and community service. In summary, his research work focuses on serving individuals with disabilities through using Universal Design for Learning and assistive technologies. Dr. Sennott’s background includes a Master’s... Read More →
KV

Katherine Vroman

Syracuse University
CW

Casey Woodfield

Hussman Institute for Autism
Casey Woodfield is currently an Associate Clinical Researcher at the Hussman Institute for Autism. She earned her Ph.D. in Inclusive and Special Education Program in the Teaching and Leadership department at Syracuse University. She also holds a Master’s degree in Cultural Foundations of Education and a Certificate of Advanced Study in Disability Studies from Syracuse University. Her academic, professional and personal interests most closely... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2015 8:30am - 1:30pm
Salon D 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

8:30am

Understanding Inter-sectional Beliefs to Enhance Cultural Competency in Communities
Limited Capacity full

 Agenda

  • 8:30 - 8:40 AM | Welcome Introductions by Jenny Stonemeier & Aaron Bishop


  • 8:40 - 9:40 AM | How Beliefs about Disability, Race, and Culture Influence Special Education Teachers' Retention - Saili Kulkarni


  • 9:40 - 10:40 AM | Experiences and Beliefs of Adolescents with Disabilities Who Identify as LGBTQ - Laurie Gutmann Kahn


  • 10:40 -11:10 AM Break 


  • 11:10 AM - 12:10 PM | Fierce Love: The power of stories to bring communities together - Susan Cushman, Abigail Braithwaite, Alicia, Delashmutt, Hope Sasek, Michelle Haines, Nicole Silverman


  • 12:10 - 1:10 PM | Using what we have learned to implement change. Facilitated by Mat McCollough, Natalie Holdren, Jenny Stonemeier, and Aaron Bishop featuring all workshop presenters. 


  • 1:10 - 1:45 | Q&A and Reflections 







Moderators
avatar for Natalie Holdren

Natalie Holdren

TEP Faculty & Doctoral Student, UC Santa Barbara
Inclusive Education, Cultural & Linguistic Competence, Evidence-Based Practices, Literacy Instruction
avatar for Jenny  Stonemeier

Jenny Stonemeier

Director of Education Policy, TASH
ask me about: | TASH | TASH Conference | Membership | EducationEquity | Inclusive Education | Education Policy | gluten free cooking

Speakers
avatar for Aaron Bishop

Aaron Bishop

Commissioner, Administration on Disabilities
avatar for Saili Kulkarni

Saili Kulkarni

California State University Dominguez Hills, California State University Dominguez Hills



Wednesday December 2, 2015 8:30am - 1:45pm
Salon B 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

1:00pm

Evidence Based Practices (EBP) and Implementation Science (IS) Colloquium
Two inter-related intellectual and social projects are affecting the social sciences which provide means and content for the advocacy and helping professions serving individuals with severe disabilities and their families. These projects are the Evidence Based Practices (EBP) movement and the multidisciplinary effort to establish an Implementation Science (IS).  The purpose of this invited colloquium will be to bring together activist scholars and innovative interventionists who are engaged in analyzing, developing, evaluating, and implementing evidence based practices for improving the quality of life of individuals with severe disabilities across the lifespan. The central question that will be discussed is how these movements are relevant to the future of advocacy, intervention and research for this population. In particular, how should TASH as an advocacy and research organization position itself in response to these trends? While EBP and IS have been of key importance in many disciplines, there are unique issues and questions which arise in the context of social activism informed by science and in the domain of concerns about people with severe disabilities.  Invited speakers will present papers on several aspects of this central question, followed by informal discussions of the ideas they will share. The papers will be submitted for a special issue of Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities in order to disseminate the questions, reflections, and proposed solutions discussed in the papers and colloquium.  Examples of the questions and issues that may be discussed by presenters include, but are not limited to the following:


  1. In light of the social conditions in which most people with severe disabilities live, what has been and should be the role of research, research synthesis and evaluation, and formal implementation projects in improving their quality of life?

  2. Given the heterogeneity of the population of people with severe disabilities and their families how should EBPs affect individual supports whether in early intervention, public school education, or community service systems? 

  3. What have been the benefits and the limitations of relying on model demonstration projects of EBPs in our field?

  4. What are lessons learned from effective examples of large scale implementations of EBPs  and how are they relevant?

  5. What has the field of clinical and counseling psychology learned about the development and implementation of EPBs, both in terms of strengths and shortcomings, and what are the implications for education and support to persons with severe disabilities?

  6. What should be our stance in regard to practices which are driven by a commitment to a set of shared values but which do not yet have substantial research support?

  7. When should values override evidence in the selection of instruction and/or supports, if at all?

  8. How should practices based on sets of general principles and procedures such at Positive Behavior Support be evaluated in light of the efforts to catalogue EBPs?

  9. Given a substantial evidence base that is often not applied in community and family settings, how can EBPs be more effectively disseminated and implemented?

  10. What should be the role of qualitative research in the EBP and IS movements?

  11. What social policies are needed to promote development of new EBPs and implementation of established ones? 

  12. What should be the role of participatory action research in these movements?

  13.  How can individuals with disabilities and their families have a compelling voice in these movements?

  14. What is the role of advocacy in relation to the EBP and IS movements?

  15. How do cultural, social class, and linguistic differences interface with these movements?


 

Here is a preliminary list of invited speakers and possible topics. Invitees are welcome to change the topic of their talk as they see fit:

 

Introduction: George HS Singer UCSB


  1. Rob Horner, U. O. —Evidence based practices and Implementation Science, their recent history and relevance to our disciplines and to social advocacy.  

  2. Fred Spooner UNCC—what are the evidence based practices in the field of special education for individuals with severe disabilities? What is missing?

  3. Pat Mirenda  UBC--Evidence Based Practice and AAC— lessons, special challenges, and future steps.

  4. Joe Lucyshyn UBC—Defining EBPS in Positive Behavior Support.

  5. TBN—the role of qualitative research and a dissenting view of the current EBP movement.

  6. Laurie Powers PSU—the place of self-advocacy and participatory action research in these movements.

  7. Mian Wang UCSB—the impact of culture on EBP’s and IS.


Speakers will be invited to give a 20-minute presentation with 10 minutes discussion with the audience on a topic of their choice and to provide a paper to interested audience members.  Papers Power Point presentations will be posted on the TASH website prior to the meeting. 



Moderators
avatar for Martin Agran

Martin Agran

University of Wyoming
Dr. Martin Agran is a nationally recognized researcher in the area of special education. He is a professor and former department head in the Department of Special Education at the University of Wyoming. Additionally, he served as a professor in the Special Education Departments at Utah State University and the University of Northern Iowa (where he also served as department head), respectively. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Fred Spooner

Fred Spooner

Professor, UNC Charlotte
Fred Spooner (Ph.D., University of Florida) is a Professor in the Department of Special Education, and Child Development and Principal Investigator on a Personnel Preparation Project involving distance delivery technologies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and Co-Principal Investigator on a U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences (IES), Project to teach students with moderate/severe intellectual disability... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2015 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Columbia 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

1:00pm

Evidence Based Practices (EBP) and Implementation Science (IS) Colloquium
Click HERE for Complete details and event page.

Two inter-related intellectual and social projects are affecting the social sciences which provide means and content for the advocacy and helping professions serving individuals with severe disabilities and their families. These projects are the Evidence Based Practices (EBP) movement and the multidisciplinary effort to establish an Implementation Science (IS).  The purpose of this invited colloquium will be to bring together activist scholars and innovative interventionists who are engaged in analyzing, developing, evaluating, and implementing evidence based practices for improving the quality of life of individuals with severe disabilities across the lifespan. Click HERE for Complete details and event page.

Moderators
avatar for Martin Agran

Martin Agran

University of Wyoming
Dr. Martin Agran is a nationally recognized researcher in the area of special education. He is a professor and former department head in the Department of Special Education at the University of Wyoming. Additionally, he served as a professor in the Special Education Departments at Utah State University and the University of Northern Iowa (where he also served as department head), respectively. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Fred Spooner

Fred Spooner

Professor, UNC Charlotte
Fred Spooner (Ph.D., University of Florida) is a Professor in the Department of Special Education, and Child Development and Principal Investigator on a Personnel Preparation Project involving distance delivery technologies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and Co-Principal Investigator on a U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences (IES), Project to teach students with moderate/severe intellectual disability... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2015 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Columbia 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

1:30pm

Education & Technology Workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

Agenda:
1:30- 2:30 PM Download Me: Apps and Inequality. Jennifer Dalsen
2:30- 3:30 PM- Addressing epistemology and attitude to improve implementation and use of Assistive Technology. Robin Shobe, Rebecca Schulte
3:30- 4:30 PM- Technology and Integration: LAUSD's Approach to Creating Inclusive Opportunities Through iPads. Geri Fuchigami, Ryan Morse, James Koontz,Maria Ricario, Kari Tapie
4:30 -4:30 PM Q&A and Reflections (Optional)

Speakers
avatar for Robin Shobe, MS CCC-SLP

Robin Shobe, MS CCC-SLP

Education Specialist II, Oregon Department of Education
Robin Shobe is a licensed and certified Speech-Language Pathologist. She is currently pursuing her doctorate in Learning Technologies and has specialized in Assistive Technology and Augmentative and Alternative Communication. In her current position at the Oregon Department of Education, Robin is the state AEM coordinator and collaborates with many Oregon organizations to improve awareness and knowledge of AT such as: SWIFT (Oregon), FACT... Read More →
JD

Jennifer Dalsen

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
I am a doctoral student in the Curriculum & Instruction Department at UW-Madison. My research focuses on: digital access and looking at how students with disabilities learn through technological supports. I am an active collaborator with the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) on UDL.
GF

Geri Fuchigami

Coordinator, LAUSD
avatar for Ryan Morse

Ryan Morse

Specialist, Alternate Curriculum, Alternate Curriculum Team
MR

Maria Ricario

Specialist, Integration, Integration Team
KT

Kari Tapie

Los Angeles USD


Wednesday December 2, 2015 1:30pm - 4:30pm
Salon H 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

1:40pm

Wretches and Jabberers
Limited Capacity filling up

"Wretches & Jabberers" tells the story of two men with autism, Tracy Thresher and Larry Bissonnette, journeying around the world to change prevailing attitudes about disability and intelligence. 

About the Film:
In Wretches & Jabberers, two men with autism embark on a global quest to change attitudes about disability and intelligence. Determined to put a new face on autism, Tracy Thresher, 42, and Larry Bissonnette, 52, travel to Sri Lanka, Japan and Finland. At each stop, they dissect public attitudes about autism and issue a hopeful challenge to reconsider competency and the future. Growing up, Thresher and Bissonnette were presumed “retarded” and excluded from normal schooling. With limited speech, they both faced lives of social isolation in mental institutions or adult disability centers.

When they learned as adults to communicate by typing, their lives changed dramatically. Their world tour message is that the same possibility exists for others like themselves. Between moving and transformative encounters with young men and women with autism, parents and students, Thresher and Bissonnette take time to explore local sights and culture; dipping and dodging through Sri Lankan traffic in motorized tuk-tuks, discussing the purpose of life with a Buddhist monk and finally relaxing in a traditional Finnish sauna. Along the way, they reunite with old friends, expand the isolated world of a talented young painter and make new allies in their cause. From beginning to end, Thresher and Bissonnette inspire parents and young men and women with autism with a poignant narrative of personal struggle that always rings with intelligence, humor, hope and courage. To learn more about Wretches and Jabberers, go to: http://www.wretchesandjabberers.org/

 

Speakers
PC

Pascal Cheng

Communication Specialist, Howard Center
avatar for Harvey Lavoy

Harvey Lavoy

Director Communication Training & Resources, Community Developmental Services


Wednesday December 2, 2015 1:40pm - 3:10pm
Salon D 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

1:40pm

Creating a Place Called Home
Limited Capacity full

We are challenged to create housing opportunities that are truly individualized where the person experiencing a disability is the leaseholder or deed holder of their home. We only create real home enviorments when we provide choice and control in relation to housing options one person at a time. This workshop will provide and array of proven strategies and methods utilized for creating person-controlled community based rental housing and home ownership opportunities. Myself along with local advocates, Portland housing organizations and professionals will share their universal stories and expertise on how to help individuals create a place called home. OBJECTIVES: Participants will be able to gain a better understanding of rental and home ownership resources available to create a place called home.
Participants will understand how asset-building strategies can improve the lives of individuals with disabilities without harming public benefits.
Participants will understand how to create community partnerships to obtain generic community housing resources.
Participants will learn the values and vision surrounding person controlled housing.


Wednesday December 2, 2015 1:40pm - 4:40pm
Portland 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

1:40pm

Ensuring Autonomy & Avoiding Guardianship
Agenda:

  • 1:40- 2:40 PM Rethinking Guardianship: Preserving Autonomy. Dohn Hoyle

  • 2:40- 3:40 PM- Guardianship and Supported Decision Making: Untold Stories. J. Matt  Jameson, Tim  Riesen, Shamby  Polychronis

  • 3:40- 4:40 PM- Restoring and Preserving Rights: Undoing/Avoiding Guardianship to Assure Autonomy. Dohn Hoyle, Paul Newmano 

  • 4:40 -4:50 PM Q&A and Reflections (Optional)




Speakers
avatar for Dohn Hoyle

Dohn Hoyle

Director of Public Policy, The Arc Michigan
Dohn Hoyle is the currently the Director of Public Policy (formerly the Executive Director) of The Arc of Michigan and a long-time advocate for the rights of people with disabilities. A respected leader and innovator in the disability movement, Dohn helped to rewrite the Michigan Mental Health Code to include person-centered planning and to eliminate the term mental retardation; was instrumental in the closure of specialized nursing homes for... Read More →
PN

Paul Newman

Chief Operating Officer, Community Living Services


Wednesday December 2, 2015 1:40pm - 4:40pm
Salon G 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

1:40pm

Positive Support Strategies for People Most at Risk of Being Left Out
Limited Capacity filling up

At KFI we believe that supports for people with intellectual disabilities must focus on full community participation; with opportunities to work, live and play alongside neighbors. Yet, day to day we are confronted with “the elephant in the room,” the assumption that those opportunities are for "everyone else" but the person with significant behavioral challenges. Positive Approaches start with progressive and proactive leadership to build a team who believes in the person and the community; and that can implement strategies utilizing authentic conversations, training, planning and outreach to support every person to have opportunities to live, work, play and belong.

As a result of this workshop session participants will be able to: 
1. Describe Challenging Behavior. (What it is. What it isn't.)

What makes behavior "challenging"? Who is it challenging to? When is a challenging behavior not something we need to address? Behavior is challenging when it impacts the person's ability to engage in his or her life. We will consider whether support delivery, expected routines, the environment, etc., might contribute to these behaviors; and where that may be the case to consider that our behaviors might in fact be the challenging ones.

2. Identify potential, general contributors to Challenging Behavior.

People experience challenging behaviors for many specific and very individualized reasons. However, there are common things to consider. First and foremost, medical causes must be ruled out, including mental health, neurological sensitivities and chronic pain. Loneliness, exclusion and lack of control likely cause or exacerbate much challenging behavior. Trauma, learning and communication must also be considered. 

3. Describe creating safe space for the person. 

Supporting a person with significant behavioral challenges requires creating safe space. Take immediate steps ensure that the person FEELS safe with where they are, who they are with, what they are doing. Interventions must remain positive and respectful. Environments or programs or staff must be changed. We show the person we are listening by making immediate adjustments, and having authentic conversations about what we can't do right now. 

4. Identify strategies for supporting a person with significant behavioral challenges.

Strategies can be individualized to support the person.These include discovery, community building, authentic conversations, preparation and planning, scripting, role playing, teaching new skills, and building the person's capacity for resilience.

5. Identify strategies for supporting the people who provide supports to the person with significant behavioral challenges.

The team is essential, and requires thoughtful training and support, solid communication, empowerment, authentic conversations, safe places and camaraderie.



Speakers
avatar for Gail Fanjoy

Gail Fanjoy

Executive Director, KFI
2016 TASH Award Winner (Barbara R. Trader Leadership Award)Gail Fanjoy is CEO of KFI (Katahdin Friends, Inc.), an agency which provides supports for people with disabilities in the areas of community employment, supported living, and community life engagement in Maine.  Having worked for KFI since 1976 (40 years!), she has been a leader in the revolutionary shift in service delivery away from sheltered and segregated services to customized... Read More →
avatar for Laurie Kimball

Laurie Kimball

Director, KFI South, KFI
Laurie has made a career of facilitating support for people with disabilities to live real lives and participate in socially valued lifestyles in their communities. Laurie's passions are for positive approaches to challenging behavior, person centered services and building community. She directs home support services for individuals living in their own homes in Southern Maine.


Wednesday December 2, 2015 1:40pm - 4:40pm
Salmon 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

2:30pm

Becoming Bulletproof
Positive Images in the Media Award Winner

“Becoming Bulletproof” documents the making of an original Western film called “Bulletproof”. “Bulletproof” features actors with and without disabilities who meet every year to write, produce, and star in original short films. The philosophy is to create a truly inclusive community that builds genuine friendships that transcend stigma and stereotypes. Inside the whirlwind filmmaking process of mastering lines, pushing through take after take, and grappling with high expectations, “Becoming Bulletproof” chronicles the genesis of a riveting film and a personally and socially transformative experience.

Together, James and Barnett financed their first feature documentary film SUPERHEROES. The film was a breakout hit at the 2011 Slamdance Film Festival where it won the first ever “Theatrical Release Award”. Both are currently developing new projects at SuperFilms.


Wednesday December 2, 2015 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

2:30pm

About TASH Talks

Hosted by: Joann Nolls

TASH Talks are informal discussions regarding a topic that are not meant to provide answers, but rather evoke creative thinking about an issue (e.g. personal experience, story, point of view).The presentations are chosen at random from the list below.  And, each presenter delivers his/her talk around a particular topic for 8-10 minutes. 

This Year's TASH Talks are:

At the end of the Talks we will screen this short film, Brandon's Story, A Mother's Voice (Part of TASH’s Film Festival), And  short talk about Leading Organizations of Americans with Disabilities Call for Reform of AbilityOne® Program  by Michael Bailey 


Speakers
JN

Joann Noll

I am an advocate for inclusion.


Wednesday December 2, 2015 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Salon A 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

2:30pm

Man on Fire: Youth Leadership in Civil Rights
Limited Capacity seats available

As we celebrate 40 years of leadership through TASH, new leaders are emerging in our youth. Benjamin McGann is a young man with autism who does not speak. However, his words communicate his loud and clear message about human rights, communication and education. Ben writes, ?My goal for myself going forward is to be an advocate for nonspeaking people everywhere. I want to be a leader in the new civil rights movement. The rights for people with autism to have the same access to education as normal people! I have a revolution to lead!?.OBJECTIVES: 1. Discuss the rights of people who do not speak. 2. Describe ways to include students who do not speak in general education. 3. Discuss leadership opportunities for youth with special needs. 4. Develop improved understanding of the abilities of students who do not speak but desire to learn.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth L. Vosseller, M.A., CCC-SLP

Elizabeth L. Vosseller, M.A., CCC-SLP

Director, SLP, Growing Kids Therapy Center
Elizabeth Vosseller has been a practicing Speech-Language Pathologist since 1995. She earned her Bachelors and Masters degrees in Speech and Hearing Sciences from the University of Maryland. Elizabeth has focused her career in both academia and therapeutic practice. As a Professor and Clinical Supervisor at The George Washington University she taught courses at the undergraduate and graduate level in the Speech-Language and Education... Read More →


Ben png

Wednesday December 2, 2015 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Salon A 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

2:30pm

Honoring Marci
Limited Capacity seats available

In 2013, Marci, a 39 year old woman with the most significant impact of disability, died in Ft. Worth, Texas. It was discovered that she had died of neglect and her sister and father were charged with a felony. In September of 2015 both Marci’s sister and father were sentenced to 20 years in prison for their role in her death. Additionally, her service provider and case manager were censured by the state for their lack of responsiveness. The details of this case were heart wrenching and troubling regarding the vulnerability of people who depend totally on others for their well-being. However, Marci’s life was not one simply of tragedy. Instead, the majority of her life was one of participation, meaning, contribution and hopefulness. Marci worked for nearly 15 years for the Star Telegram newspaper and, as a result, provided a clear role-model of how people who need assistance to make a contribution can be included in community employment. Beyond her work, Marci was assisted to participate in an array of activities that were part her life.
This session will provide an opportunity to hear about both the triumph and tragedy of Marci’s life as well as a chance to discuss the challenging issues of supporting families and their family members with the most significant impact of disability.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Callahan

Michael Callahan

President, Marc Gold & Associates
Customized Employment, Discovery, Job Development, Systematic Instruction, consulting, certification, inclusive community planning


Wednesday December 2, 2015 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Salon B 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

2:30pm

Promoting Competitive, Integrated Employment for persons with disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Through the establishment of Employment First initiatives, many states already have resolved to implement policies that promote integrated employment as the first and preferred option of services for individuals with disabilities. Both AIDD and AIDD support these initiatives and other efforts to change states' employment systems by providing grants, technical assistance, training and capacity building support. This session will discuss successful system change across state systems to improves employment outcomes. As a result of this session participants will be able to:1. Provide basic overview of ODEP’s investments in E1st state activities through EFSLMP
2. Provide basic overview of AIDD’s investments in E1st through PIE and ECL
3. Provide early outcomes of ODEP's and ACL's employment initiatives

Speakers
avatar for Aaron Bishop

Aaron Bishop

Commissioner, Administration on Disabilities
avatar for Serena Lowe

Serena Lowe

Senior Policy Advisor, Office of Disability Employment Policy


Wednesday December 2, 2015 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Salon C 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

2:30pm

1:1 Para Professional: Promotion of Optimal Independent Development
Limited Capacity seats available

Parents of students with severe disabilities and the students themselves are directly impacted when a 1:1 para professional is serving the student on a daily basis. Over the last 40 years little quality research has examined the critical role and accountability of the 1:1 para. This presentation explores the ways parents, with assistance from their child, can make informed requests for quality trained paras, as well as strategies to monitor the degree of support that best encourages the student?s growth and independence.

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 2:30pm - 5:00pm
Salon A 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

2:30pm

Aging and developmental disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

I supported Gail for five years. On her last day, I stood by her bed when they made the decision to remove the ventilator. I kissed her goodbye before they moved her to a private room and then I left, heading out into the cold night air with the sensation of her forehead on my lips. When Gail died her disability died with her, and so did the rationale for my presence in her life. I was no longer her worker, I was transformed into a person who had loved her and lost her. . OBJECTIVES:As a result of this workshop participants will be able to reflect on the complexities of the paid support role when it becomes end-of-life care. Participants will be encouraged to identify the potential ethical dilemmas that end-of-life presents for paid workers, and to consider how the relationship between paid staff and family may undergoes a renegotiation at this time. Participants will reflect on the need for clear communication, transfer of knowledge, and the need to structure how hospital staff will shared information between staff and family.

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 2:30pm - 5:00pm
Salon A 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

2:30pm

Assessing Quality of Life in Students with DD Enrolled in UC's TAP
Limited Capacity seats available

There are increasing number of post-secondary programs that have become available for individuals with developmental disabilities over the past several years. There is little information known about how the participation in postsecondary education affects their quality of life (QOL). Availability of social network and supports may have a significant impact on QOL and overall successful adult outcomes. Objectives: 1.To examine aspects of quality of life in UC's TAP students using both surveys and individual interviews. 2. To examine how QOL measures are related to individual, environmental, and UC TAP program factors. OBJECTIVES1. Discussion research methods and results. 2. To discuss the conclusion that may give us an understanding of specific environmental and support factors that may predict success in post-secondary education programs that may allow us to develop specific supports for individuals with DD to live independently 2. To gain competitive employment 3. To achieve optimal adult outcomes in the community IMPORTANCE: The results revealed that most important quality of life domains were interpersonal relationships, personal development, and self-determination. This is critical information that has significant implications for the development and modification of existing postsecondary education programs. TRANSLATING TOPIC INTO POSITIVE OUTCOMES: Understanding of specific environmental and support factors that may predict success in post-secondary education programs may allow us to develop specific supports for individuals with DD to live independently, gain competitive employment, and achieve optimal adult outcomes in the community.


Wednesday December 2, 2015 2:30pm - 5:00pm
Salon A 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

2:30pm

Communication & Acceptance is the Cure
Limited Capacity seats available

Huan Vuong is a nonspeaking young man with autism who advocated for inclusion in general education classes through multiple IEP meetings. In this TASH TALK, Huan will present his view on autism, inclusion and acceptance. His perspective is, "tests that require motor or speech are never going to accurately measure the intelligence of autistics. Labeling students intellectually disabled sets the lowest possible expectations. I have constantly been mislabeled as cognitively impaired therefore I have been denied regular teaching." "I do realize that I live in the typical world but feel most at home with those who embrace all of me." . OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe the limitations of cognitive and academic testing for students with motor planning issues. 2. Discuss the need for inclusion of students who do not speak in general education. 3. List alternative ways for students who do not speak to show their comprehension. 4. Demonstrate the understanding that nonspeaking does not mean nonthinking.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth L. Vosseller, M.A., CCC-SLP

Elizabeth L. Vosseller, M.A., CCC-SLP

Director, SLP, Growing Kids Therapy Center
Elizabeth Vosseller has been a practicing Speech-Language Pathologist since 1995. She earned her Bachelors and Masters degrees in Speech and Hearing Sciences from the University of Maryland. Elizabeth has focused her career in both academia and therapeutic practice. As a Professor and Clinical Supervisor at The George Washington University she taught courses at the undergraduate and graduate level in the Speech-Language and Education... Read More →
avatar for Huan Voung

Huan Voung

Huan Vuong is 18 years old, a student at Wakefield High School in Arlington, VA. After years of silence, Huan now has found his true voice with Rapid Prompting Method (RPM). He is a leader in the Autism community and an advocate for those who still do not have a voice.


Huan png

Wednesday December 2, 2015 2:30pm - 5:00pm
Salon A 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

2:30pm

Shut Out: My Story and the Need to Presume Competence
Limited Capacity seats available

Emma Budway is a youth leader who advocates for the presumption of competence. Emma values general education curriculum and has appreciation for the reciprocal value same-age typical peers provide. "Competence is something those of us with autism have but

Speakers
avatar for Christine Vosseller

Christine Vosseller

Growing Kids Therapy Center
Christie is a Human Resources practitioner by trade with extensive credentials in both private and public sector. She earned her undergraduate degree in Communication from Hollins University and a Master of Arts in Contemporary Communication from Notre Dame of Maryland University. Christie is proud to volunteer with AEA and support practitioners, parents and students who will be speaking on topics of education, advocacy and RPM at this... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth L. Vosseller, M.A., CCC-SLP

Elizabeth L. Vosseller, M.A., CCC-SLP

Director, SLP, Growing Kids Therapy Center
Elizabeth Vosseller has been a practicing Speech-Language Pathologist since 1995. She earned her Bachelors and Masters degrees in Speech and Hearing Sciences from the University of Maryland. Elizabeth has focused her career in both academia and therapeutic practice. As a Professor and Clinical Supervisor at The George Washington University she taught courses at the undergraduate and graduate level in the Speech-Language and Education... Read More →


Emma png

Wednesday December 2, 2015 2:30pm - 5:00pm
Salon A 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

2:30pm

Tweet It: Disability and Social Networking Sites
Limited Capacity seats available

Individuals with significant disabilities and their families are finding ways to express their voice through the digital universe. The question becomes whether this voice is making a direct impact on those outside their immediate social circle. I look at how social networking sites are currently being used to support individuals with disabilities and pose questions to audience members on ways to strengthen their voice in future posts.

Speakers
JD

Jennifer Dalsen

Madison, WI, United States, University of Wisconsin - Madison
I am a doctoral student in the Curriculum & Instruction Department at UW-Madison. My research focuses on: digital access and looking at how students with disabilities learn through technological supports. I am an active collaborator with the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) on UDL.


Wednesday December 2, 2015 2:30pm - 5:00pm
Salon A 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:00pm

Brandon's Story, A Mother's Voice
Limited Capacity seats available

Brandon’s mother talks about the impact of early intervention on her son’s life and on her family. Brandon is a teenager and talented musician shares his insights about people with disabilities and music.

About the Film:
Brandon’s Story, A Mother’s Voice is an 8 minute video which features Brandon’s mother as she talks about the importance and impact of early intervention on her son’s life and on her family.

Brandon, who is a teenager and talented musician, shares his insights about people with disabilities and music as well. The video was produced by the Integrated Training Collaborative, which is a project of the Partnership for People with Disabilities at VCU. The video is available at https://youtu.be/zIzBK1JgGgM

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Salon A 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Poster Presentations
Poster presentations capture information about a particular topic in the form of printed text and graphics. Presentations are displayed on 36"x48" boards on easels during a two-hour period. Poster presentations will take place on Wednesday, with Best Poster Awards following on Friday.

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Voices from the Classroom: Thoughts about the Future of Special Education
Limited Capacity seats available

This study used descriptive statistics, rating and ranking procedures and responses to open-ended survey questions to examine predictions of 137 Special Education teachers who provide educational support to students with moderate to severe disabilities about 13 concepts that influence the future of Special Education in America. The study expanded on a previous research project which surveyed 447 general educators and members of the public. This study created a picture of 21st century Special Education as an effort to secure funding for programs to balancing the academic requirements with the individual needs of the child and keeping up with emerging technologies.

Participants will be able to:
1. Identify the key concepts that the Special Education teachers identified as the most influential for the future of education.
2. Recognize and discuss with others potential concerns for the future based on the results of the open-ended survey questions.
3. Affirm the current data and share in pairs or small groups to brainstorm other possible concerns for the future of Special Education.

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:00pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Instruction partnerships: Advocates and Allies
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will include two university faculty members- (allies) and one self-advocate to discuss bringing the first person experience into on-line courses in a variety of ways. The efforts have included mentoring & increasing the presence of the self-advocate in courses. Some strategies included: in small short video's and discussion boards related to the content; topical presentations created by self advocate and jointly edited by the self-advocate and the faculty allies The presentation will include examples. Summarizing with projected plans to grow these efforts to increase the first person voice in teacher preparation.

Learning Objectives: 

1) Participants will become familiar with the process for including and promoting first person voice in on-line courses
2) Participants will become familiar with the strategies that support the self-advocate and increase participation.
3) Participants will learn the results of the impact on student learning.
4) Participants will learn about the personal experiences and comments of the students.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Hinkle

Stephen Hinkle

Self Advocate, Self Employed
Stephen is a self advocate, person with autism and a current online facilitator for Lesley University. Stephen is a graduate of Northern Arizona University with a masters degree in special education disability policy. Stephen obtained his undergraduate degree from San Diego State University in Computer Science. Stephen is an international speaker has spoke in 24 states, plus Australia over the last 16 years. Stephen's audiences have included... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

A review of inclusive comprehensive treatment models for young children with ASD.
Limited Capacity seats available

Unfortunately, young children with ASD often receive segregated services, partly due to the still lingering “readiness” and “behavior control limitation” myths (Strain, Schwartz, & Barton, 2011). There are several comprehensive treatment models (CTMs) that incorporate evidence-based practices to offer economical services related to the core characteristics of ASD, but reviews have not focused on inclusive CTMs (National Research Council, 2001; Odom, Boyd, Hall & Hume, 2010; Rogers & Vismara, 2008). This session describes a review of studies of inclusive CTMs for young children with ASD published over 17 years that outlines common components, study quality and effectiveness.

Learning Objectives: 

a) Identify inclusive comprehensive treatment models (CTMs) for young children (toddlers and preschoolers) with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
b) Describe components of effective inclusive CTMs for young children with ASD
c) Summarize the outcomes for children with ASD who are enrolled in these programs
d) Discuss the role attendees can take to adapt and implement strategies embedded within CTMs to improve outcomes for young children with ASD within inclusive settings.

Speakers
CR

Cecelia Ribuffo

Graduate Assistant and Technical Assistance Specialist, CEEDAR Center


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Accessing General Education Science Content through Content Area Literacy Instruction
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will share findings from a single-case multiple baseline research study targeting science concept learning for secondary students with significant disabilities. Specifically, this study examined the effectiveness of systematic literacy instruction leveraging content area literacy strategies before, during, and after reading an adapted expository science text on student comprehension. Student intervention results as well as findings from social validity interviews with students and teachers will be shared. Research in this area will help establish the evidence base needed to support the continued academic instruction and learning in content aligned with the general education curriculum of students with significant disabilities
.
Learning Objectives: 

1. Identify strategies to implement before, during, and after reading expository text to facilitate comprehension: Specifically, participants will learn about ways to structure systematic content area literacy instruction. They will identify pre-reading strategies (pre-teaching key vocabulary), during reading strategies (graphic organizer and comprehension monitoring), and post-reading strategies (main idea and summary statement) that can be implemented in research and practice.

2. Summarize the need for systematic, explicit content-area instruction: Participants will review the intervention results and the social validity interview data and recognize the importance of a systematic approach to instruction in the academic content areas, making connections regarding the application of academic content areas to post-secondary life.

3. Identify ways to support teachers in implementing such instruction: Throughout the presentation, participants will be invited to participate in a discussion regarding the challenges to implementing content-area literacy instruction within applied, inclusive settings for students with significant disabilities. They will be invited to identify potential ways to address concerns teachers or families may have with such instruction. Furthermore, as a group, we will brainstorm ways to facilitate inclusive content-area literacy instruction across a variety of content areas. 

Speakers
CR

Carly Roberts

Assistant Professor, University of Washington


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Advocacy Across the LifeCourse
Limited Capacity seats available

Members of the DC Supporting Families Community of Practice will describe how we have used Person-Centered Thinking tools and skills to reframe our conversation from what deficits people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) have to what people like and admire about our family members and how to best support them. We will describe how we have used Positive Personal Profiles to identify areas for systemic advocacy and build shared responsibility for the levels of change that must occur to advance our system of supports for people with and their families, throughout a person's life.

Learning Objectives:

1. Understand the work of the “National Community of Practice for Supporting People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities throughout the Lifespan" with a focus on systems change efforts in the District of Columbia. D.C. has convene a team of family members, people with IDD, and other government and community partners, to develop and implement an action plan to shape policies and programs that support families. 

2. Learn about how the DC Supporting Families Community of Practice uses person-centered thinking tools and skills as a vehicle for envisioning success, and for understanding and building a shared responsibility for the levels of change that must occur to advance our system of supports.

3. Describe families' visions for how we can better support them and their loved ones with IDD. 

4. Summarize how people with IDD, family members, non-profits, and government agencies in D.C. used what they had learned from working collectively on Positive Personal Profiles to begin making changes at all levels– in thinking, in practice, in policy, and in rules and legislation – to better support people with IDD and their families throughout the lifespan. 

5. Share the Advocacy Across the LifeCourse guide, created by members of the DC Supporting Families Community of Practice to support systems change efforts by people with IDD and their families.

Speakers
avatar for Erin Leveton

Erin Leveton

Director, State Office of Disability Adminstration, Department on Disability Services
Erin Leveton is the Program Manager of the State Office of Disability Administration at the District of Columbia Department on Disability Services, supporting the agency in policy and legislative affairs, program development, stakeholder relations, and helping DDS to accelerate gains in performance and best practice in areas such as Employment First, Person Centered Thinking, community integration, and self-determination/ supported... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Aligning Math Instruction to Common Core Standards for Students with Significant Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

States that have adopted Common Core standards have asked teachers to hold their students to higher expectations. In math, standards address both content knowledge and applying knowledge to solve problems in daily life. For teachers who support students with significant cognitive disabilities, instruction may focus on alternate achievement standards but must continue to provide connections to daily life. This study examined effects of an instructional package aligned to middle school Common Core math standards for students with significant disabilities. Data suggest a functional relationship between teacher use of the package and students’ ability to solve problems independently.

Learning Objectives: 

1) Identify three features of instruction that support access to grade-aligned math curriculum
2) Identify contexts in which students can apply grade-aligned problem solving skills in everyday life
3) Create a story-based math problem that applies grade-aligned math skills to a problem of daily life 

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Amazing Life Changing Experiences: Transition programs aren?t just for those with disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

While a plethora of research on transition education exists, much less researched are "soft" outcomes. Within our program, some of the most profound outcomes have been organic; mediated by context. Being located on a college, many authentic and age-appropriate experiences involving college and transition students have emerged unscripted. We draw upon narratives of pre-service teachers' transformative understandings of transition and youth with significant disabilities.

Learning Objectives:
• This presentation will discuss the many positive outcomes that a transition program has on a university campus and university student life.
• Participants will gain some insight in the “soft” yet profoundly moving outcomes that CPP participants and their University peers mutually enjoy.
• The presenters will raise critical questions about participation and integration of persons with significantly disabling conditions.
• This presentation will explore the benefits of age-appropriate programming and help participants gain a better understanding of ways to implement this type of program in their community and/or local college campus.

Speakers
AW

Amy Williamson

CrossingPoints Coordinator, The University of Alabama


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Assessing Integration of Home and Community-Based Services Settings
Limited Capacity seats available

New regulations restrict Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services funding to settings that are truly "community-based." But how are states determining which settings are, and are not, community-based? This talk will provide a general overview of the new rule and discuss assessment methods that states have used to determine whether settings are offering adequate opportunities to exercise self-determination and participate in community life. The presentation will involve discussion of the benefits and drawbacks of different assessment methods and information on how professionals can get involved.

Learning Objectives: 

1. Understand the general effect of the HCBS settings rule
2. Locate their state's transition plan
3. Identify possible issues with how their states plan to assess compliance with the settings rule
4. Advocate for better compliance with the new rule

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Assistive Technology Solutions for Aging Successfully with a disability
Limited Capacity seats available

There are many obstacles that individuals with Developmental Disabilities (DD) encounter daily as they age that can hinder them from remaining at home and age successfully in communities of their choice. This talk will present what’s new in Assistive Technology (AT) and the Aging in Place movement as we explore where we were, where we are, and perhaps, where we are going. Real-life examples of AT that assists with fall detection and prevention, environmental control, memory, healthy-living, hearing, seeing, communication, and computer access will be shared. 

Learning Objectives: 

1. Describe 3 AT solutions for aging in place. 
2. Identify 3 apps to assist with successful aging.
3. List 3 resources to stay current with aging resources and AT trends. 

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Bereavement preparation, experiences and needs
Limited Capacity seats available

As adults with IDD age, they face the death of parents and other loved ones. Grief can affect all aspects of their lives. It challenges resilience and coping skills. Advocates for people with IDD must recognize and respond to the need for more information and support around death/grief in the lives of people with IDD/their families. This researcher conducted national online surveys of self-advocates and guardians focused on death preparation, and bereavement experiences for adults with IDD. The goal is to build curriculum and supports so that those with IDD can journey through expected losses with evidence-based information and supports.

Learning Objectives: 

  • describe negative impacts of lack of death and grief education and support
  • identify actions/resources to support adults with IDD in death preparation
  • identify actions/resources to support adults with IDD in dealing with grief



Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Celebrating 30 years of Family Leadership and Support
Limited Capacity seats available

The Family Support Institute (FSI) is a provincial non-profit society. FSI supports 10,000 families each year. This support stems mainly from our volunteer network of over 250 volunteers who support families in BC by sharing experiences and expertise, connecting families with each other, guiding families to supports and services in their regions, and facilitating training and educational sessions. FSI is unique in Canada. FSI believes that families are the experts and the strongest voice when it comes to their children. We support all families, with children of all ages and all disabilities. We have been operating successfully for 30 years.

Learning Objectives: 

  • Learn the successful steps to building a grass roots, family driven support organization.
  • Learn what hurdles we have faced as a provincial society over the past 30 years, and how policy was developed and practice was informed as a result. 
  • Learn the challenges and benefits of a volunteer driven organization, and what strategies are most effective for informing public policy and community development.
  • Learn how we define diversity and how we embrace inclusion and family support, with unique approaches to collaboration with government and service providers that complements the work we do provincially.

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Collaborative Advocacy in the Autism Community: An Inclusive Framework for Social Change
Limited Capacity seats available

This panel presentation features personal perspectives of Autistic Adults and Parents and highlights their ongoing collaborative projects through social media, and other means, to challenge negative stigma about Autism, and to promote social justice and human rights. They will share their framework for collaboration, a model that respects and honours differences in communication/processing and recognizes that the future of neurologically diverse society is dependent on the development of inclusive practices.

Learning Objectives:

• identify strategies to support collaborative work in advocacy approaches between parents and Autistic adults. 

• list effective strategies that honour diverse processing and communication styles and foster a relationship of trust

• discuss and share examples of collaborative advocacy projects created through the use of social media platforms and identify a minimum of three information platforms or sites which amplify the voices of Autistic adults

• explain the positive impact of the online relationships in building community and in supporting Autistic people in self-determining roles that impact public policy and opinion. 

• summarize the importance of including Autistic adults in conversations around autism and the importance of reframing Autism so that is not seen through the stigmatized lens of tragedy.

Speakers
avatar for Kassiane Sibley

Kassiane Sibley

Bouncer, Parenting Autistic Children with Love & Acceptance
I'm a vintage 1982 Autistic & epileptic activist. I've been standing for Autistic rights since before it was cool.


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Communication: Using topic boards to stimulate discussion and the sharing of ideas
Limited Capacity seats available

TASH is celebrating 40 years of progressive leadership because it has “a vision of a world in which people with disabilities are included and fully participating members of their communities…and will be realized when…All individuals have a way to communicate and their communities are flexible in communicating in alternate ways that support full participation”. In support of TASH’s vision, this poster session will introduce aided language modeling and topic boards as a way to increase the sophistication of a person’s communication. These strategies promote and support one’s full participation in conversations and the sharing of ideas. The concept of aided language modeling will be introduced through demonstration and examples. The most salient features of a topic board needed to broaden a student’s opportunities to share ideas, comment and participate in discussions will displayed.

Speakers
avatar for Lou-Ann Land

Lou-Ann Land

University of Kentucky


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Confessions from post-secondary education: If we knew then what we know now
Limited Capacity seats available

After 5 years of wonderful student success stories, ACE-IT in College at Virginia Commonwealth University is ready to share directly some challenges and stumbling blocks encountered in implementing an inclusive post-secondary education program for students with intellectual disabilities. While some of the things that initially did not work turned into opportunities, there remain other student issues and service provision complexities that we did not anticipate and may deal differently with in the future. It is hoped that what has been learned by one of the first TPSID projects will be useful for other developing post-secondary programs serving students with disabilities.

Learning Objectives: 

1) identify barriers and issues that can occur when implementing an inclusive post-secondary education program with students with intellectual disabilities;
2) learn creative solutions that have been used to successfully deal with those issues;
3) increase opportunities for success within their own post-secondary education programs through the application of strategies learned during the session.

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Content-based Strategies and Resources for the Progressive Leader
Limited Capacity seats available

This session provides resources and strategies for parents and teachers in the areas of collaboration, advocacy, inclusion, culturally responsive instruction and UDL/ differentiated instruction. The results from the study describe how teacher candidates created an easy to access document/files for future use in the classroom workplace that support inclusion efforts. Lessons learned will be shared and examples of the content-based strategies and resources will be provided at this presentation.

Learning Objectives: 
1) Identify resources and strategies for collaborating with educators, parents, and agencies in accordance with IDEIA
2) Promote service, advocacy, and leadership in the field of special education
3) Recognize co - teaching models that focus on the inclusion needs of individuals with exceptionalities
4) Celebrate and foster inclusion, diversity, independence and multiculturalism 


Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Daycare Center Directors' Attitude toward Inclusion of Children with Disabilities in Korea
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this study was to explore the attitude of the daycare center directors toward inclusion of young children with disabilities in Korea. The subjectivity study method (Q-methodology) was used for this research. The Q-statements of this study were 37 units. P-samples as subjects of this research were 36 daycare center directors. As the results of this research, the attitude of daycare center directors toward inclusion of children with disabilities was structured in three types. The result of this research will be helpful for the Korea government to plan the policy about inclusion of young children with disabilities.

Although the importance of inclusive education for young children with disabilities has been emphasized for long time, most of general daycare center have denied the inclusion of young children with disabilities in Korea. Lots of young children with disabilities are included in the daycare centers for children with disabilities which are separated from general children. One of the reason is the clause of the law relation to inclusion is not mandatory but just recommendation. The other reason is the myths about inclusion of young children with disabilities; that is, general children will follow the behavior problem of children with disabilities and can’t speak as like children with disabilities. To increase of inclusion of young children with disabilities in daycare center, the attitude of directors is important. From this research, we knew the attitude type of daycare center directors toward inclusion of young children with disabilities in Korea. Depends on their attitude type inclusion of young children with disabilities, it will be need to approach to increase and improvement of inclusion in daycare center. Learning objectives of this study are the awareness on the importance of attitude type analysis and introduction about the subjective study.


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Decision-Making Processes of Beginning Special Education Teachers Including Students with Severe Challenges
Limited Capacity seats available

Twelve beginning special education teachers from 12 cultural diverse school districts participated in a year-long action research project defining their decision-making processes. Results indicated wide variability in teacher roles, and common elements reflecting collaboration, student priorities, IEP goals, and curriculum and instruction. Comparisons with teacher preparation standards indicated significant discrepancies that will be explored. Implications for promoting future inclusive practices for students with severe challenges are discussed.

Learning Objectives: 

• Identify common decision-making themes of 12 special education teachers given their varied roles and responsibilities
• Describe how teachers’ decision-making priorities reflected for students with severe challenges are discrepant from standards of performances expected using teacher training competencies in severe special needs.
• Share and clarify decision-making models used by research participants in contrast to session participant models reflected by their content map drawings.

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Educator ratings of importance and intensity of supports provided in inclusive settings
Limited Capacity seats available

Application of a social-ecological model to students with disabilities in schools calls for supports to be provided that increase access to inclusive settings; requiring educators to identify, arrange, and implement supports. Yet, little is known about educator perceptions of importance of different types of supports. Therefore, an investigation of the relative priority educators’ ascribed to different types of supports provided in inclusive settings was investigated.

Learning Objectives:

As a result of this session, participants will be able to describe the social-ecological approach to understanding individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities (ID/DD) and the importance of this approach in identifying the support needs of children with ID/DD. Based on study findings, participants will be able to describe educator perceptions of the importance and intensity of different types of supports provided to students with disabilities as a method to increasing their engagement in regulation education classrooms. Lastly, participants will be able to describe implications and future directions for research with respect to providing supports to students with ID/DD in order to increase participation and bridge the gap between personal competency and environmental demands.


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Effective strategies for teaching reading skills to English Language Learners with ID
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation aligns with this year’s theme by “Continuing 40 Years of Progressive Leadership” and examines a population that future research needs to address. There is little empirical research available for students with intellectual disability who may also be English Language Learners. Identifying effective research-based interventions can positively help this underserved, diverse population. This presentation will examine the past and current literature base as well as provide classroom examples of inclusive strategies for this population of students that are used by public school teachers.

Learning Objectives:

After this session, participants will be able to cite research for effective intervention when working with students who are English Language Learners (ELL) and have a moderate or severe Intellectual Disability (ID). 
After this session, participants will be able to explain the need for future research for students who are English Language Learners and who have a moderate or severe Intellectual Disability. 
After this session, participants will be able to discuss specific research to conduct involving students with moderate or severe ID who are also identified as ELL. 
After this session, participants will leave with real life inclusive strategies to use with students with ID who are ELLs. This material will be presented by current teachers in a large urban school district.



Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Effects of embedded instruction on functional skills on students with ID
Limited Capacity seats available

This study uses a single subject alternating treatment design to compare Embedded Instruction (EI) and Discrete Trial Training (DTT) on functional skills for students with Intellectual Disabilities. The DTT intervention will teach the functional skills in its traditional format (Lovaas, 1987) across 10 trials, in a segregated setting. The EI intervention will differ by embedding the functional skills in a multimedia literacy story created on an iPad, in an inclusive setting. During the EI intervention each skill will also be embedded for a total of 10 trials. All intervention sessions will be randomized across students and outcomes will be compared.

Learning Objectives:

1. This presentation will be relevant to practitioners and researchers that serve students with Intellectual Disabilities. 
2. The specific practices of DTT and EI will be introduced and data will be reported to show student performance.
3. Participants will be introduced to the current literature in DTT, EI, as well as shared stories with students with Intellectual Disabilities. 
4. The presentation will show professionals how to use EI when teaching functional skills through an enhanced individualized multimedia literacy story. This presentation will demonstrate how to embed discrete trials into a literacy activity on the iPad. 
5. The generalization of the findings from the study will be discussed regarding the ability to replicate (or teach) the intervention to the families of the participants. 



Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Embedding RIRD strategy in instructional settings to reduce vocal stereotypy
Limited Capacity seats available

Students who display vocal stereotypy often have difficulty participating in social activities and experience limited social inclusion (Lanovaz & Sladeczek, 2012). An intervention that has been demonstrated to quickly reduce moderate to high levels of vocal stereotypy in children with ASD and other intellectual disabilities is response interruption and redirection (RIRD). For effective implementation, a three step procedure is used (1) gaining the student’s attention at the onset of vocal stereotypy, (2) asking a question or placing a demand for a verbal response, and (3) reinforcing attempts at an appropriate verbal response. Implementation and troubleshooting guidelines will be shared.

Learning Objectives: 

a) describe the implementation steps for using the response interruption and redirection (RIRD) procedures to reduce vocal stereotypy 
b) plan and prepare for effective use of the RIRD strategy during group instruction or social settings
c) create a monitoring plan to ensure that the intervention is reducing vocal stereotypy and increasing functional communication
d) revise implementation plan using troubleshooting options if the intervention is not effective as initially designed

Speakers
JW

Jenny Wells

Associate Professor, University of Hawaii at Manoa


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Evidence Based Practices in Action: Perspectives from Teachers in the Field
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation highlights teachers', who were chosen for an Office of Special Education Programs Teacher preparation grant, experiences in implementing evidence based practices. Specifically, the presenters share their experiences of applying evidence based practices in their classrooms with the goal to increase inclusion for students with significant disabilities. The presenters will share the strategies that they have found most successful and discuss how to implement these strategies to promote inclusion.

Learning Objectives:

1) Be able to identify 3-5 evidence based practices that address a variety of learning needs of students with significant disabilities. 

2) Generate 2-3 ideas to increase inclusive practices by implementing evidence based practices for people with significant disabilities.

3) Share their own experiences in implementing evidence based practices in the classroom to improve inclusive practices for persons with significant disabilities. 

To do this, the presenters, who are teachers selected as part of an OSEP funded teacher preparation grant, will discuss how they have applied their knowledge of evidenced based practices to improve the inclusive practices for persons with significant disabilities at their schools. Under the guidance of their faculty mentors, several teachers will provide information about a variety of evidence based practices, how they implemented the practices within their school setting (pre-k to 21) and any obstacles they faced as well as how they overcame each obstacle. Topics may include the following: (a) self-determination, (b) family involvement, (c) person centered planning, (d) teaching academic skills (e) positive behavioral supports, and (f) data based decision making (Browder, Wakeman, et al., 2007; Jimenez, Mims, & Browder, 2012; McDonnell & Copeland, 2011; Westling & Fox, 2009; Wood, Fowler, Uphold, & Test, 2005). The presenters will also share the outcomes of their implementation of strategies. 

This session is unique as it encourages engagement between attendees and several practitioners with demonstrated leadership skills who are passionate about increasing evidenced based inclusive practices to promote change within their school setting for students with significant disabilities. The teachers who will be presenting work with students from culturally, linguistically and economically diverse backgrounds. Individualized attendee needs will be considered throughout the presentation to ensure full participation by all. Information will be presented through visual and auditory means. 




Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Evidence-based Practices for Students with Severe Disabilities: The CEEDAR Center Report
Limited Capacity seats available

Educating students with severe disabilities is a complex process that spans many domains. Traditionally, research has examined how to teach students valuable life skills. More recent research has addressed the need to apply explicit and systematic instruction to teach academic content and processes as well. This report represents a synthesis of evidence-based and research-based practices for teaching students with severe disabilities a full range of skills. Specifically, this presentation will describe the body of research for how to teach, what to teach, and how to support the full educational experience for students with severe disabilities.

Learning Objectives:

a) Identify the mission and resources of the CEEDAR Center
b) Summarize the evidence base practices for how to teach students with severe disabilities
c) Describe best practices for what to teach students with severe disabilities.
d) Indicate optimal supports for improving learning of students with severe disabilities.
e) Discuss how the Evidence Based Practices for Students with Severe Disabilities Innovation Configuration is used to evaluate current teacher preparation and professional development (PD) by determining the extent to which these EBPs are taught, observed, and applied within teacher preparation and PD programs

Speakers
CR

Cecelia Ribuffo

Graduate Assistant and Technical Assistance Specialist, CEEDAR Center
avatar for Julie Thompson

Julie Thompson

Assistant Professor of Special Education, Texas A&M University
Julie L. Thompson, PhD, BCBA, is an Assistant Professor at Texas A&M University. Julie’s research examines explicit instruction procedures to teach academic skills to ethnically and linguistically diverse minimally vocal-verbal children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in public school settings. She is particularly interested in group instructional arrangements and technology delivered-instruction.
avatar for Leah Wood

Leah Wood

Assistant Professor of SPED, Cal Poly


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Evidence-Based Practices for Teaching Mathematics to Students with Moderate and Severe Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

This year's conference theme, “Celebrating 40 Years of Progressive Leadership”, exudes excitement for a bright future for people with disabilities. For example, in the area of teaching, researchers have identified numerous evidence-based practices to help guide educators to make informed decisions about the instructional practices they use to teach. In this spirit, this poster presentation describes the results of a comprehensive review of the literature for teaching mathematics to students with moderate and severe disabilities. Included studies were reviewed for quality using established quality indicators and high quality research was then used to determine any evidence-based practices.

Learning Objectives: 

• Explain the process for determining evidence-based practices
• Name two evidence-based practices for teaching mathematics to students with moderate and severe disabilities
• Describe the changes in mathematics instruction in the past 9 years

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Examining Appropriate Participation and Performance of U.S. Students on Alternate Assessment
Limited Capacity seats available

Appropriate participation of students with disabilities in standardized assessments is a value championed by TASH and other advocacy groups. Students with disabilities are required to participate in standardized assessment but little guidance exists on how students are selected for participation in alternate assessment. In this presentation, we examine national data on the participation rates of students with disabilities.

Learning Objectives: 

1. Identify and discuss issues regarding the participation of students with disabilities on standardized and alternate assessments.
2. Compare/contrast participation rates related to student and state characteristics.


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Experiences of Elementary Students with IEP Participation
Limited Capacity seats available

Much of the focus to date on students participating in their IEP meetings has focused on preparation of high school students in the context of transition planning. However elementary and middle school students stand to benefit from IEP participation. This session introduces a call for change in IEP participation to include students in their educational planning as early as the fourth grade. This session will present research that explored factors that motivated fourth- and fifth-grade students with high-incidence disabilities to participate in their IEP meetings and factors that supported and impeded their participation.

Learning Objectives:

(1) Teachers will learn factors that motivated fourth- and fifth-graders with high-incidence disabilities to participate in their IEP meetings.
(2) Teachers will learn factors that supported and impeded IEP participation for fourth- and fifth-graders with high-incidence disabilities.
(3) Teachers will learn autonomy-supportive teaching strategies that facilitate more active student IEP participation.
(4) Administrators will learn ways to support teachers (through training, professional development, and provision of instructional materials) in their efforts to prepare elementary students for IEP participation.

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Extending a Higher Education-School Collaboration into the Community: The Big Read Project
Limited Capacity seats available

The “Big Read” is an annual community public library event that promotes discussion and special events around a selected central text. Integral to this project is the cooperation of local school districts to promote use of the selected text in English Language Arts Instruction. The “Big Read” Project will describe a process by which pre-service teacher candidates created adapted text summaries of the selected text for middle and high school students who need additional support to access grade-appropriate text in order to promote participation of all local students in their community library’s “Big Read” event.

Learning Objectives: 

1) List 5 steps in creating an adapted text summaries to accompany the study of adult fiction and non-fiction text
2) Create an adapted text summary of a short passage from a novel recommended for use in middle and high school ELA classes
3) Identify 3 additional means of providing access to a novel for students who need support with text-based learning

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Family first line charge in the empowerment of persons with severe disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

The role of family in the support of persons with severe disablement, their encouragement and care with inadvertently help in propelling those with these severe disablement to face the larger society.

Learning Objectives: 

Participants will learn and value the role the family provides in the early life of PWDs especially those with severe disablement .

Family support to help PWDs understand what they will face in the larger society and thereby better prepare them for the future that is so uncertain.


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Fidelity versus Flexibility: Implementing Scientific Practices in Inclusive Science Classrooms
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will provide results from an alternating treatment design study in which students received science instruction in high fidelity and flexible conditions in an inclusive classroom. Students with and without disabilities demonstrated an increase in academic and social responses and scientific practices in the high fidelity condition.

Learning Objectives: 

1. Participants will be able to design effective procedures for implementing an inclusive, standards-based science lesson with high fidelity.
2. Participants will summarize ways to increase self-efficacy for students with and without disabilities who participate in the described science lessons. 
3. Participants will be able to use provided artifacts in similar lessons, including science lab notebooks, student questionnaires, and data sheets. 

Speakers
avatar for Leah Wood

Leah Wood

Assistant Professor of SPED, Cal Poly


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Fostering Home School Collaboration: Online Professional Development for Rural Teachers
Limited Capacity seats available

Technology has reshaped professional development by increasing access to information, enabling sustained follow-up efforts, and fostering teacher reflection and collaboration. Drawing on theoretical models of parent involvement and an ethic of caring, this study examined the perceptions and attitudes of educators and principals toward collaborating with parents of children with disabilities. This inquiry utilized a digital documentary and online curriculum for teachers’ professional development. Results indicate that teachers who participated in online professional development showed increased recognition of the importance of collaborating with families. Principals saw potential for growth and recognized the need to provide professional development for their teachers.

Learning Objectives:

1. Administrators and researchers will have the opportunity to learn about the outcomes for a rural school district, which participated in a study using this approach to professional development. 
2. Educators and administrators involved in professional development are provided information about an innovative approach so that they may be better able to support teachers in building collaborative partnerships with parents. Access to the online documentary and accompanying curriculum is available for educational purposes to schools districts interested in delivering professional development.
3. Parents and their families are provided the opportunity to recognize the power of their stories about their experiences of raising a child with a disability. The stories contained in the digital documentary are told by families tell about the joys as well as the dynamics of raising a child with a disability. From parents, educators can learn to broaden their perspective by listening to families’ stories and in doing so, appreciate the need to form empathy and value the importance of communication and collaboration with parents.



Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Function-Based Intervention in Inclusive School Settings: A Meta-Analysis
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this meta-analysis was to summarize single case intervention research in which function-based intervention was applied within inclusive settings to address challenging behaviors of students with disabilities. We will present (a) a descriptive summary of the research included in the review, (b) overall effect of function-based intervention, (c) study characteristics that moderated intervention effect, and (d) implications for practice and research.

Learning Objectives: 

The primary goal of this presentation is to describe meta-analytic research. Specifically, we will describe the study methods and the final results, including (a) a descriptive summary of the research in which function-based interventions were applied within inclusive settings to address challenging behavior, (b) overall effect of function-based intervention, and (c) study characteristics that moderated intervention effect. Also, we will describe implications for practice and future research and facilitate discussion with poster session attendees. 
As a result of this session, poster session attendees will be able to 
(a) describe the methods and results of the study, 
(b) discuss the implications for practice and future research, and 
(c) apply learned knowledge to their own practice or research. 

Speakers
avatar for Yun-Ching Chung

Yun-Ching Chung

Assistant Professor, Illinois State University
Yun-Ching Chung is an assistant professor in the department of special education at Illinois State University. Her research interests include peer interactions, inclusion outcomes of students who use augmentative and alternative communication, and paraprofessional facilitation.
avatar for Virginia Walker

Virginia Walker

Assistant Professor, Illinois State University


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Future Educational Leaders' Perceived Knowledge of Supporting Students with Severe Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this qualitative study is to determine the level of knowledge of school personnel - including administrators, counselors, and general educators/curriculum experts - regarding the services necessary to support students with low-incidence disabilities - specifically severe disabilities - and to determine the additional knowledge and skills required by these educational leaders in order to meet not only the legal mandate but also the social justice goals of IDEA.

Learning Objectives: 

After this session, participants will be able to:
a. discuss at least three barriers that graduate students report in their knowledge in supporting students with severe disabilities and their families,
b. describe at least two to three solutions for each barrier that could be addressed at either the university and/or district level,
c. identify 'next steps' in using this knowledge to inform practice


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Generalization of comprehension across content areas for students with ASD
Limited Capacity seats available

In order to include students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in the general classroom, teachers need to consider the unique challenges experienced by individuals with ASD. Students with ASD often struggle with text comprehension as well as generalization. This session will consider the text comprehension research for students with ASD. Participants will be provided with examples of how to implement strategies to increase comprehension during core content instruction. Participants will learn techniques for programming for effective generalization across people, settings and materials, with an emphasis on teaching individuals with ASD to access the general classroom and increase independence.

Learning Objectives: 

1. Participants will learn effective text comprehension strategies across core content areas for students with ASD.
2. Participants will learn how to plan for generalization of text comprehension skills, particularly generalization to the general classroom.
3. Participants will learn strategies for adapting text-based content area instruction for learners with ASD in the inclusive setting.



Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Getting to Know Us-National Raise & RSA Parent Centers
Limited Capacity seats available

It was called Getting to know us - National RAISE and RSA Parent Centers
Opportunity to meet with the newly funded RSA National Parent Technical Assistance Center and representatives from the 7 funded Parent centers to discuss their projects and plans to supports families and youth as they navigate systems critical to successful transition. As a result of this session participants will be able to: Meet with the newly funded RSA National Parent Technical Assistance Center and representatives from the 7 funded Parent centers to discuss their projects and plans to supports families and youth as they navigate systems critical to successful transition.
Opportunities to discuss collaboration and sharing of resources both traditional and non-traditional.
Move the conversation forward for youth and family toward true independence; what does it take to get there?

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Historical, Legal and Cultural frameworks of parental involvement for students with disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation is to provide audience a variety of perspectives about the involvement of families of students with disabilities. Historical, legal, and cultural frameworks as well as trends of parental involvement in the United States will be provided in a chronological order. The information about national parent advocacy organizations will also be provided. A family member will be telling stories about an immigrant family of a son with Autism and how parents involve in their son's special education in the United States.

Learning Objectives: 

1. The attendees will be able to understand the historical, legal, and cultural frameworks and trends of parental involvement in the United States.
2. The attendees will be able to know the historical major issues of parent involvement.
3. The attendees will be able to obtain the information about national parent advocacy organizations. 
4. The attendees will be able to listen to a journey of an Asian immigrant family about advocating inclusion for their son in a public school system. 


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

How to Take a Leadership Role in Your Child's IEP Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

For too long, parents have been intimidated by Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings. Therefore, parents do not always get to fully advocate for their children's needs. As parents of students with IEPs, educators of and advocates for children with significant disabilities; the presenters have been personally challenged to ensure their own effective parent participation in IEP meetings. Presenters will provide advance preparation strategies to help families assume an active role in the IEP discussion. Participants will use strategies in role play and other interactive activities to develop leadership skills for future meetings.

Learning Objectives: 

By the end of this session, participants will be able to:
a. Articulate goals they have for their student’s education and/or transition
b. Discuss strategies to address goals in multiple settings
c. Effectively use language to demonstrate their understanding
d. Direct conversation to address their questions or points of concern


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Impacts of Employment First Policy on Vocational Rehabilitation Outcomes
Limited Capacity seats available

This paper uses state-level Rehabilitation Services Administration Case Service Report (RSA-911) data in the context of a multi-period difference-in-difference model to assess the impact of state-level Employment First policy adoption on short-term labor market outcomes.

Learning Objectives: 

The presentation will result in 1) a better understanding of average impacts from Employment First policy implementation on VR outcomes; and 2) an increased understanding of relevant methods for analyzing multi-period policy adoption data.

Speakers
avatar for Leanne Giordono

Leanne Giordono

PhD Student, Oregon State University


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Including learners with LID: Best practices in teacher training and professional development
Limited Capacity seats available

A shift from medical model to social model has impacted pre-service teacher preparation and in-service teacher professional development on inclusion. A framework of increasing knowledge of disability policies and laws, increasing contact with individuals with disabilities, and building confidence in use of inclusive instructional practices will be discussed. In light of continuing progress, this presentation will discuss ways in which teacher training and professional development can continue moving forward to creating more inclusive learning environments for all learners.

Learning Objectives: 

1. Learners will identify current issues and challenges in inclusive education
2. Learners will identify 3-5 best practices for inclusive education in teacher training
3. Learners will identify 3-5 best practices for inclusive education for in-service professional development
4. Learners will identify 2-3 supports for implementing inclusive education in a variety of contexts


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Inclusion: A Question of Practice, Stance, Values and Culture
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will present a systematic, mixed-methods phenomenological research study that examined the phenomenon of inclusion in a large, urban public school system. The study explored the lived experiences of teachers who identify as Champions of Inclusion (Henderson, 2007). The study centered on the experiences and perspectives of these teachers in regard to inclusion as a civil rights and social justice imperative, their perspective on the current culture of their organization as a facilitator or inhibitor of inclusion, and their views on how their organization might capitalize on their commitment and competency by utilizing them as mechanisms for transformative change.

Learning Objectives:

- Deconstruct how inclusion “happens” 

- Identify constructs that go into the “making of inclusion”

- Gain insight into how organizations can mitigate resistance to inclusion by using its own power (policy and structures), as well as its built-in capacity (champions of inclusion), to turn the discourse on inclusion from being exclusively about disability, to one of inclusive education as foundational to democracy, education reform and social justice, and the belief that each individual is valued and should belong

- Gain insight into what educational organizations can do to help schools overcome resistance to inclusion and overcome some of the stumbling blocks to creating inclusive classrooms
Gain insight into the practices, values and policies that cultivate, reinforce and sustain inclusive culture at the organizational level    
- Gain insight into how educational organizations can take the lead to enact the shift from a “medical model” of disability that legitimizes the segregated education of individuals with disabilities, to a “social model” that rejects the focus on impairments and limitations and seeks to illuminate policies and practices that marginalize some students 

Speakers
avatar for June Sellers

June Sellers

National Urban Special Education Leadership Initiative, University of Central Florida
June is a dedicated leader and tireless educator/advocate in the field of Urban Special Education and is honored to be a doctoral scholar representing the National Urban Special Education Leadership Initiative (NUSELI). Her professional goal is to improve the educational outcomes of students with disabilities and those from under-served populations by relentlessly working toward continuous improvement and innovation in urban public school... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Intellectual Disability and Sexuality: The Missing Link
Limited Capacity seats available

There is a void when it comes to the voices of people labeled as having intellectual disabilities regarding their own sexuality; their perspectives have not been described. This research study explores the existing literature that discusses the perspectives of others and then studies the perspectives and experiences of people who have intellectual disabilities about sexuality. Individuals labeled as having intellectual disabilities can, and should, be a part of these discussions about their own sexuality. We must continue to progress so that individuals labeled as having disabilities may be more fully included in all aspects of life.

Learning Objectives:

1. As a result of this session participants will be able to gain a better understanding of the perspectives of people with disabilities in regard to their own sexuality. 
2. Participants will be challenged to think about ways in which supports for people with disabilities may be improved as a result of the findings of this study. 
3. Participants will be able to think more openly about sexuality and disability, and learn the importance of including people with disabilities in conversations directly impacting their lives. 
4. Participants will be able to identify further needs within the field of intellectual disability and sexuality, and discuss ways in which this research can and should be continued.

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Interdisciplinary Collaboration for Students Who Require Continuous 1:1 Nursing Supports in School
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will present preliminary findings on a qualitative study that investigated special educators’, school nurses’, and 1:1 nurses’ perceptions on interdisciplinary collaboration for students with complex health care needs who require continuous 1:1 nursing supports in school. A discussion on promoting student dignity, independence, and social inclusion through interdisciplinary collaboration will be highlighted.

Learning Objectives: 

1. Understand the unique educational needs of students who require continuous 1:1 nursing supports.
2. Understand the legal requirements for schools to provide continuous 1:1 nursing supports when needed to attend school safely. 
3. Understand the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration between educators and health care professionals for students with complex health care needs, and what factors are unique to students who require continuous 1:1 nursing supports.
4. Understand existing practices in interdisciplinary collaboration between special educators, school nurses, and 1:1 nurses for students who require continuous 1:1 nursing supports at school. 
5. Understand effective or needed practices in interdisciplinary collaboration to promote student dignity, independence, and social inclusion for students who require continuous 1:1 nursing supports at school.

Speakers
SK

Stacy K Dymond

Professor | Department of Special Education | University of Illinois


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Investigating Literacy Learning Opportunities for Adults with ID/DD in a Community Setting
Limited Capacity seats available

Literacy skills support self-determination, lifelong learning, expanded opportunities for fulfilling work and careers, and meaningful interactions within the community. Adults with Intellectual Disability and Developmental Disabilities (ID/DD) have traditionally had limited opportunities to continue acquiring literacy skills. This case study investigated the impact of embedded professional development on the literacy learning opportunities of individuals with ID/DD. Before and after the intervention, we interviewed service providers and individuals with ID/DD, conducted a literacy dig of the work environment, and investigated priorities represented in Individual Service Plans (ISPs). We discuss implications for improving literacy learning opportunities and make recommendations for future research.

Learning Objectives: 

• Articulate the importance of literacy across the lifespan
• Make connections between challenges related to literacy learning in adult services and K-12 education
• Understand the importance of developing policies, procedures, and programs that communicate literacy learning as a priority for adults with ID/DD
• Think about the challenges present in building capacity and sustaining implementation of literacy learning programs in community work settings.

Speakers
JM

Jessica McCord

Educational Consultant, ACERI Partners


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Labeling in Special Education
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Learning The Access Codes To Life: A Person with a disability's Perspective
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Literacy Instruction and Access to the General Curriculum: A Teacher Survey
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
CR

Carly Roberts

Assistant Professor, University of Washington


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

May I Pet Your Dog?: Service Dog versus Therapy Dog
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Mindfulness Yoga and children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation explains how mindfulness yoga when in cooperated in classroom for students with autism can assist them to perform better. Autism is a complex neurological disorder that greatly effects quality of life, impairs communication skills, social interaction in severe cases. Many children engage in repetitive and stereotyped behavior. Yoga mindfulness when performed and practiced with consistency can provide benefits to health, mental strength, well-being, emotional stability and self-regulation among individuals with autism. Individuals with ASD undergo lot of stress and portray behavior challenges. Mindfulness yoga as an emerging self-care therapy helps improve effective relationships, focusing and understand inner experiences. 

Benefits of presentation: • This presentation will inform educators, therapists, parents, guardians on benefits of yoga for children in autism spectrum disorder. • Inform individuals present in the conference the five areas of practice that include balanced step: asanas, pranayama, deep relaxation techniques, poses or postures and music therapy. • The presentation will also inform individuals on neuro-biological aspect of yoga  • The presentation will also discuss emerging neuro-science studies.   

Speakers
avatar for Sujata Norman

Sujata Norman

SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHER, ALBERTVILLE HIGH SCHOOL
I have been a teacher for nearly 25 years. I have taught in three continents and five countries. I have been handling students with behavioral issues and reading on mindfulness and yoga. I have conducted a pilot study using a specific mindfulness based intervention and will be conducting my PhD dissertation study in few months.


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Mothers' Narrative on the Life with Children with Disabilities in Multi-Cultural Families
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Moving through barriers: Examining transition experiences of culturally diverse students with disabilities and their families
Limited Capacity seats available

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

National Survey of Special Educators: Communication Use for Students with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Parent/Guardian Preconceptions of I/DD Student Participation in Post-High School Programs
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Partnering for Success
Limited Capacity seats available


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Peer interactions and relationships of high school students who use AAC
Limited Capacity seats available

Social interactions and peer relationships have been valued as an important inclusion outcome for students with significant disabilities. However, little is known about whether and how students with severe disabilities, especially those who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC; e.g., communication devices, signs, pictures), interact with peers without disabilities. We conducted observations to record naturally-occurring peer interactions of high school students who use AAC in inclusive classrooms. In addition, parents and teachers completed a questionnaire to share information on students’ social networks. We will share preliminary results and discuss recommendations for educational teams who support students who use AAC.

Speakers
avatar for Yun-Ching Chung

Yun-Ching Chung

Assistant Professor, Illinois State University
Yun-Ching Chung is an assistant professor in the department of special education at Illinois State University. Her research interests include peer interactions, inclusion outcomes of students who use augmentative and alternative communication, and paraprofessional facilitation.


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Progressive Leadership in Action
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Retention of Independent Living Skills in I/DD Population
Limited Capacity seats available


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Social Validity in Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
CO

Conrad Oh-Young

Doctoral Student, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Doctoral Student in the UNLV College of Education Department of Educational & Clinical Studies.


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Special Delivery Diagnosis of a Disability
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Shyanne Richardson

Shyanne Richardson

Owner/ Director, The Sidewalk Center


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Students with Disabilities Create Models for Money Management Utilizing Software
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Survey of Early Career Researchers in Severe Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Ruppar

Andrea Ruppar

Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison
avatar for Virginia Walker

Virginia Walker

Assistant Professor, Illinois State University


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Teacher candidates’ understanding of autism – Designing courses that address the knowledge gaps
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
MS

Mary Sheppard

Rowan University


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Teacher Implemented Functional Communication Training: A Review of the Literature
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Teacher's experience in inclusion class of elementary school in Korea
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Teachers' Decisions in Curriculum for Secondary Students with Severe Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Teaching Early Numeracy Skills to Students with Severe Multiple Disabilities and Complex Communication Needs
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Teaching Early Numeracy Skills to Students with Severe Multiple Disabilities and Complex Communication Needs
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Teaching/learning within circles of co-practice: Mentors, interns, and university coaches addressing ableism
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Technology integration and student engagement: Rural teachers' perspectives
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Alex Hollingshead

Alex Hollingshead

Assistant Professor, University of Idaho
Dr. Aleksandra Hollingshead is an assistant professor of special education at the University of Idaho in Moscow, ID. She was born and raised in Poland and moved to the United States in 2003. Upon earning a Master degree in special education, Dr. Hollingshead worked as a special education teacher with students with autism and severe behaviors. She earned her doctorate degree from the University of Cincinnati in 2013. Dr. Hollingshead’s... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

The ADA applies to parenting!
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

The Power of Words
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Christine Vosseller

Christine Vosseller

Growing Kids Therapy Center
Christie is a Human Resources practitioner by trade with extensive credentials in both private and public sector. She earned her undergraduate degree in Communication from Hollins University and a Master of Arts in Contemporary Communication from Notre Dame of Maryland University. Christie is proud to volunteer with AEA and support practitioners, parents and students who will be speaking on topics of education, advocacy and RPM at this... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

The Relationship Between Student's Skills, Goals, and State Standards: A Systematic Review
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Alison Zagona

Alison Zagona

Doctoral Candidate, University of Arizona
I am a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Arizona in Tucson, AZ. As a former special education teacher, I am passionate about including students with significant disabilities in all aspects of the educational experience. My research is focused on instructional, social, and behavior supports for students with significant disabilities in the general education classroom, teacher preparation to implement these supports, and collaboration with... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Thinking Outside The IEP Boxes: How-to Create Solutions With Possibility Thinking
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Transition Services for Students with Significant Support Needs: Creating Model Programs
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Transitioning out of the family home: supports for families
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
LL

Laura Lee Wright

Ministry Consultant, Bethesda Lutheran Communities
I am a person who defines myself as the daughter of the King of kings. Born with Cerebral Palsy, living with challenges is just away of life. The last 15 years, I have been able to look at both faith and disability. I have developed church programs, consulted with churches, have a passion for teens and an organization called Young Life Capernaum. Finally, I am passionate about developing persons with varying abilities into leaders- throughout the... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Transitioning to college: Advocacy for inclusive higher education learning
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Trends and Outcomes in Inclusive Higher Education: Data from National Coordinating Center
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Cate Weir

Cate Weir

Project Coordinator, Think College
inclusive postsecondary education for students with intellectual disabilities



Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Using Peer Supports in Work Based Settings for Students with Significant Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Lindsay Athamanah

Lindsay Athamanah

Doctoral Student, University of Illinois at Chicago


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Using Shared Stories and Systematic Prompting to Promote Comprehension of Workplace Texts
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers

Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Using UDL to Promote the Inclusion of Individuals with ID in College
Limited Capacity seats available


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Whose the Expert? Self-Advocates Teach Attorneys Person-Centered Thinking
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Erin Leveton

Erin Leveton

Director, State Office of Disability Adminstration, Department on Disability Services
Erin Leveton is the Program Manager of the State Office of Disability Administration at the District of Columbia Department on Disability Services, supporting the agency in policy and legislative affairs, program development, stakeholder relations, and helping DDS to accelerate gains in performance and best practice in areas such as Employment First, Person Centered Thinking, community integration, and self-determination/ supported... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:30pm

Exhibit Hall Opens!
Details coming soon.
Please come back!  

Exhibitors
avatar for DK Arts

DK Arts

DK Arts
DK Arts (est. 2005) is owned and operated by self-advocate, Dylan Kuehl. He proves that living with Down syndrome is not the obstacle it is often perceived to be. Dylan has won many awards for his art, been published in numerous books and magazines and continues to push beyond the boundaries and limits that can often be associated with Down syndrome or other disabilities. He started his business selling his art on cards, post cards, and prints... Read More →
avatar for Oregon Speech-Language and Hearing Association

Oregon Speech-Language and Hearing Association

The Oregon Speech-Language & Hearing Association is dedicated to providing the highest level of communication potential to people of all ages and abilities, representing Oregon’s 2200 licensed speech-language pathologists, speech-language pathology assistants and audiologists. As a professional group, we advocate for improved access to communication services and strongly support the Communication Bill of Rights for all individuals.
avatar for CapGrow Partners

CapGrow Partners

Since 2005, CapGrow Partners has been assisting providers across the country with their community-based housing needs by offering strategic leasing options: • Purchase/Leases • Sale/Leasebacks • Build-to-Suit/Leases • Existing Landlord Transfers • Leasehold Improvement Financing Whether providers are looking to maintain capital for business growth, prepare... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for MetLife Center for Special Needs Planning

MetLife Center for Special Needs Planning

MetLife Center for Special Needs Planning
The MetLife Center for Special Needs PlanningSM is dedicated to helping families secure lifetime care and quality of life for their dependents with special needs. The Center’s mission is to help families plan for the future of their dependents with special needs, including preserving government benefits and providing insurance and other financial solutions which can help provide lifetime quality care.


Wednesday December 2, 2015 4:30pm - 8:00pm
Salon E 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

5:10pm

Opening Reception
The opening reception will feature our conference exhibitors. Attendees will have the chance to network and visit exhibit booths. Food and beverages will be shared with attendees.

Wednesday December 2, 2015 5:10pm - 7:00pm
Salon E 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

6:30pm

The Path Forward on FC
The board will host a listening session on FC.

Speakers
avatar for Ralph Edwards

Ralph Edwards

Elected to be TASH President is a great honor. The passion and commitment of members coupled with research based advocacy is inspiring. Let's discuss ways to support TASH's continued leadership in promoting social justice and human rights.
avatar for Gail Fanjoy

Gail Fanjoy

Executive Director, KFI
2016 TASH Award Winner (Barbara R. Trader Leadership Award)Gail Fanjoy is CEO of KFI (Katahdin Friends, Inc.), an agency which provides supports for people with disabilities in the areas of community employment, supported living, and community life engagement in Maine.  Having worked for KFI since 1976 (40 years!), she has been a leader in the revolutionary shift in service delivery away from sheltered and segregated services to customized... Read More →
avatar for Rima J. Hatoum, Ph.D.

Rima J. Hatoum, Ph.D.

International Development Consultant
avatar for Jennifer A. Kurth

Jennifer A. Kurth

Asst. Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education
avatar for Ruby K Moore

Ruby K Moore

Executive Director, Georgia Advocacy Office
Ruby Moore is the Executive Director of the Georgia Advocacy Office, the designated Protection and Advocacy System for People with Disabilities in Georgia. Moore is nationally known for her work in the disability field over the past 35 years, particularly in the areas of employment, augmentative communication, and the design and implementation of supports necessary for people with significant disabilities to live, work, play, and go to school... Read More →
avatar for Mary E. Morningstar

Mary E. Morningstar

Dr. Mary E. Morningstar is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Kansas and Director of the Transition Coalition, which offers online, hybrid and in-person professional development and resources for secondary special educators and transition practitioners. Dr. Morningstar also is the Program Director for the Low Incidence teacher education program which trains teachers of students with significant... Read More →
avatar for Barb Trader

Barb Trader

Executive Director, TASH
Barb Trader is Executive Director of TASH, a progressive advocacy organization that advances inclusion and human rights of people with significant disabilities and complex needs. In her role at TASH, Barb leads APRAIS (Alliance for Prevention of Restraint, Aversive Intervention and Seclusion), a 32-member alliance of national non-profits with a mission to eliminate aversive interventions. She serves on the Board and is treasurer of the... Read More →


Wednesday December 2, 2015 6:30pm - 7:30pm
Salon I 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201
 
Thursday, December 3
 

8:00am

Exhibit Hall
Details coming soon.
Please come back!  

Exhibitors
avatar for DK Arts

DK Arts

DK Arts
DK Arts (est. 2005) is owned and operated by self-advocate, Dylan Kuehl. He proves that living with Down syndrome is not the obstacle it is often perceived to be. Dylan has won many awards for his art, been published in numerous books and magazines and continues to push beyond the boundaries and limits that can often be associated with Down syndrome or other disabilities. He started his business selling his art on cards, post cards, and prints... Read More →
avatar for Oregon Speech-Language and Hearing Association

Oregon Speech-Language and Hearing Association

The Oregon Speech-Language & Hearing Association is dedicated to providing the highest level of communication potential to people of all ages and abilities, representing Oregon’s 2200 licensed speech-language pathologists, speech-language pathology assistants and audiologists. As a professional group, we advocate for improved access to communication services and strongly support the Communication Bill of Rights for all individuals.
avatar for CapGrow Partners

CapGrow Partners

Since 2005, CapGrow Partners has been assisting providers across the country with their community-based housing needs by offering strategic leasing options: • Purchase/Leases • Sale/Leasebacks • Build-to-Suit/Leases • Existing Landlord Transfers • Leasehold Improvement Financing Whether providers are looking to maintain capital for business growth, prepare... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for MetLife Center for Special Needs Planning

MetLife Center for Special Needs Planning

MetLife Center for Special Needs Planning
The MetLife Center for Special Needs PlanningSM is dedicated to helping families secure lifetime care and quality of life for their dependents with special needs. The Center’s mission is to help families plan for the future of their dependents with special needs, including preserving government benefits and providing insurance and other financial solutions which can help provide lifetime quality care.


Thursday December 3, 2015 8:00am - 7:00pm
Salon E 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

8:20am

A Three-Stage Model for Implementing Inclusive Practices
Limited Capacity filling up

As teachers and schools move towards inclusive practices, inclusion specialists must have a vision of, and toolbox for, effective inclusive practices. This session presents research-based tools for implementing effective inclusive education using a three-stage model. Key strategies will be shared for each stage, based on current research. TASH has been a leader in promoting inclusive practices for these past 40 years, and this presentation summarizes and advances TASH?s work in this area. OBJECTIVES: Participants will use the tools and workshop space provided to adapt and design tools that are suitable for their unique situation for each of the three stages. Specific outcomes include: (1) Increase knowledge of specific strategies for implementing inclusive practices; (2) Identify and adapt appropriate tools for implementing inclusive practices in each stage; and (3) Demonstrate an understanding of developing, implementing, and enhancing inclusive practices that will be directly relevant to existing school programs.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer A. Kurth

Jennifer A. Kurth

Asst. Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education


Thursday December 3, 2015 8:20am - 9:10am
Medford 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

8:20am

A Tiered Approach to Promote Safety and Security in Postsecondary Education Programs
Limited Capacity seats available

As fully inclusive post-secondary education programs for young adults with intellectual disability continue to develop, concerns about campus safety and security issues have arisen. In this presentation, we discuss the development and effects of a three tiered model implemented on a college campus to address these issues. OBJECTIVES: 1. State the benefits and risks of persons with ID associated with attending college; 2. Describe tier 1, 2, and 3, strategies used to prevent the occurrence of safety and security issues; and, 3. Know how the tiered system has mitigated risks in specific cases


Thursday December 3, 2015 8:20am - 9:10am
Salon G 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

8:20am

Addressing Health Disparities of People with Disabilities: Designation as 'Under-served Minority Population'
Limited Capacity seats available

Designation as an "Underserved Minority" would avail the Disability community to the research, targeted health programs, health systems awareness, and funding now provided to several ethnic minorities. This will help to promote research, reduce excessive morbidity and mortality rates, increase access to care, raise awareness of policymakers and practitioner and increase funding for to address the disparities experiences of people with disabilities. This session will provide data and family experiences regarding health care services and outcomes, a rationale for the "Underserved Minority" designation and discuss strategies to achieve the designation. . OBJECTIVES:a) provide data and anecdotal information regarding the disparate health experiences of people with disabilities; b) discuss the rationale and benefits of a designation of "Underserved Minority" for people with disabilities; and c) describe strategies to achieve the "Underserved Minority" designation.

Speakers
avatar for Ralph Edwards

Ralph Edwards

Elected to be TASH President is a great honor. The passion and commitment of members coupled with research based advocacy is inspiring. Let's discuss ways to support TASH's continued leadership in promoting social justice and human rights.


Thursday December 3, 2015 8:20am - 9:10am
Salon C 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

8:20am

Belonging to Learn: Building a Unified Inclusive Model
Limited Capacity seats available

This workshop will explore one District?s journey to move from a special day class model to a District wide neighborhood school model. The discussion will include evidenced-based practices of moving to the least restrictive environment while maintaining high quality best practice instruction for all. The Palo Alto Unified School District has developed a seven-year implementation plan towards building welcoming and inviting classrooms for all. Join us for a discussion of creating a meaningful path towards inclusion, lessons learned and a progress update as we complete our fourth year towards realizing a replicable model. OBJECTIVES: Develop strategies for setting a work plan for transition to inclusive classrooms (assessing your present level of inclusive practices, barriers and opportunities) Discuss philosophical shifts for the work from District to Site based decision making and ownership (what and how to build the capacity of principals to develop a vision for their school buildings) Understand how to use teacher coaches to build capacity at the site level and in the general education classroom (in both co-taught classrooms and learning centers) district wide.


Thursday December 3, 2015 8:20am - 9:10am
Meadowlark 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

8:20am

Collaboration between Research and Parent Training and Information Centers
Limited Capacity seats available

Parent Training and Information Centers (PTIs) are missioned with educating and empowering families to advocate for appropriate services for their children. However, little research has examined whether PTIs are effective. Two studies were used to examine the effectiveness of PTIs. In Study 1, pre/post surveys were conducted with 44 parents of children with I/DD who received assistance from the PTI. In Study 2, interviews were conducted with 9 parents who attended a PTI training. Parents demonstrated significant increases in empowerment, special education knowledge, and satisfaction with services. Minority and low-income families reported the greatest increases. OBJECTIVES: 1. Participants will learn the mission of the PTIs 2. Participants will identify the ways in which PTIs are successful in meeting the needs of families 3. Participants will understand the activities of the PTIs which provide family support 4. Participants will learn directions for future research 5. Participants will understand how researchers and PTIs can work together to better support families of individuals with disabilities IMPORTANCE: In accordance with IDEA, parents of children with disabilities are equal partners in the special education process (Turnbull et al., 2011). Unfortunately, family-school partnerships are not always realized. Many parents do not understand their rights and, subsequently, may not participate in IEP meetings (Turnbull & Turnbull, 2003). TRANSLATING TOPIC INTO POSITIVE OUTCOMES: This study provides preliminary evidence that PTI activities are successful in increased empowerment, special education knowledge, and satisfaction with services among parents of children with I/DD. Policymakers and PTI staff should consider implementing more rigorous methods of evaluation to document their effectiveness. Although PTIs collaborate with researchers (Burke, in press), there is little research documenting the effectiveness of PTIs in impacting children with I/DD and their families. Currently, PTIs must submit annual reports to the Office of Special Education Programs. Within these annual reports, PTIs report the findings of calls made to 25 random families. In these calls, families are asked about how the PTI impacted their relationship with the school (National Parent Technical Assistance Center, 2012). Stronger methods of data collection are needed to further illustrate where PTIs are successful in improving outcomes as well as to target areas in which PTIs are ineffective in improving parent and child outcomes. From this presentation, participants will learn how to create collaborations between agencies and researchers, how to document the effectiveness of parent training activities, and, subsequently, how to use research methods to improve outcomes for individuals with disabilities and service providers/educators.


Thursday December 3, 2015 8:20am - 9:10am
Salmon 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

8:20am

Drawing a new map: Transitioning from home to college to life
Limited Capacity filling up

This presentation will focus on the transition from home to higher education to community living for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. One individual will share his personal experience leaving home to start college in a new state, successfully creating a circle of support in a higher education community. The presentation will also focus on transitioning from higher education into community employment. Presenters will discuss the integration of community, state, federal, and family supports for successful community participation. This presentation is about fostering inclusion for the next generation of progressive leaders in disability advocacy and generating change across all communities. OBJECTIVES: As a result of this session, participants will be able to think critically about specific supports needed for successful community transitions. As a result of this session, participants will be able to envision the integration of state, federal, community, and family supports for successful inclusion. As a result of this session, participants will be able to discuss the benefits of inclusive higher education. As a result of this session, participants will be able to respond to criticisms about presuming competence for individuals with intellectual disabilities in higher education and transition to employment.


Thursday December 3, 2015 8:20am - 9:10am
Sunstone 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

8:20am

Facilitated Communication: Case Scenarios of Success
Limited Capacity seats available

In light of celebrating 40 years of progressive leadership, TASH should be open to and offering methods that support the Right to Communicate Resolution, which this presentation will address and offer important perspective and strategies. OBJECTIVES: IMPORTANCE:The controversy surrounding Facilitated Communication (FC) has limited some people?s access to potential effective strategies for gaining communication skills. This presentation will provide methods & strategies to facilitate independent communication skills. FC can be a successful means by which people with significant disabilities and communication challenges learn to communicate. TRANSLATING TOPIC INTO IMPROVED OUTCOMES:


Thursday December 3, 2015 8:20am - 9:10am
Columbia 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

8:20am

How One School Used UDL to Re-engineer Student Learning and Space
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will share results from a past pilot case study and current scaling up from one school to district wide implementation where schools, teachers, and leaders have reconstructed learning and space to align with: (1) visible learning; (2) universal design for learning; (3) social justice; and (4) Response to Intervention to foster continuous classroom improvement practices- focusing efforts on culturally responsive and inclusive tiers of instruction and support for all students, including those with multiple and/or significant support needs/disabilities. Lessons learned during pilot and scale up work, along with enduring challenges will be shared, followed by a brainstorming solutions session, if time permits. After actively working with fellow participants, attendees will identify 3-5 best instructional practices and leadership structures needed for developing and sustaining an effective UDL environment that they can immediately implement or share.

Speakers
KH

Kris Harper

Learning Strategist, OASD
AT

Amy Toson

Assistant Professor, Cardinal Stritch University


Thursday December 3, 2015 8:20am - 9:10am
Salon A 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

8:20am

Reclaiming Credibility: Honoring the Lived Experience of Disabled People
Limited Capacity filling up

Can empirical research and professional expertise contribute to oppression? Much research has been generated in the hope that it will further the inclusion of disabled people. The danger is that this knowledge can be seen to supersede the lived experience of the very people it claims to support. When behavioural interventions are contested as problematic by those who experience them, and when communication preferences are deemed not credible, the professional response is sometimes to dismiss dissent as "merely anecdotal". Perhaps what this movement needs most is a renewed and unwavering commitment to honour the perspective and agency of disabled people.


Thursday December 3, 2015 8:20am - 9:10am
Pearl 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

8:20am

State Education Policies and their Relationships to Inclusion for Students with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

This session examines (1) state special education regulations and policy frameworks that facilitate the inclusion of students with significant disabilities in general education classrooms; (2) state outcome data (graduation rates and Indicator 14 data) for students with significant disabilities in the context of state special education regulations and policy frameworks; and (3) policy differences between highly inclusive states with positive outcomes for students with significant disabilities and highly segregated states with poor outcomes for students with significant disabilities.
OBJECTIVES: +T2 IMPORTANCE: This research establishes a knowledge base around policies and implementation that federal-, state-, and district-level leaders can use in their decision-making to fulfill the mandate that SWSD are involved and progress in the general education curriculum, which, as Jackson, Ryndak, and Wehmeyer (2008/09) show, is best addressed in inclusive contexts.
TRANSLATING TOPIC INTO IMPROVED OUTCOMES:While 95% of students were educated in general education settings for at least some part of the day, there were wide disparities in placements especially among SWSD. The rate of inclusion (80% or more in general education) increased from 46.5% to 57.2% (USDOE, 2012). However, although the average rate of inclusion for students with SLD is 60%, the average rate for students with Autism is 39%. The average rate for Intellectual Disability (InD) is only 17% - a number that has remained relatively stable over time (McLeskey, Landers, Williamson, & Hoppey, 2012; USDOE, 2012); the average rate for students served under the category of multiple disabilities is similarly low at only 13% (USDOE, 2012). Moreover, among states there is wide variation in placement rates for SWSD. For example for students with InD, placement rates for 80% or more in general education range from almost 4% in Washington State to almost 64% in Iowa (UDSOE, 2012). We now know that SWSD obtain improved school and postschool outcomes when taught in inclusive contexts (Ryndak, Jackson, & White, 2013). However, the segregation of students on the basis of disability rests on assumptions that certain students cannot learn in or benefit from participation in a ?regular? classroom; and in a large part, we have seen a national retrenchment toward segregated services for these students (Kurth, Morningstar, & Kozleski, 2015). A policy framework must exist at the school, district, state, and federal levels that is fully aligned with inclusive reform initiatives and removes barriers to successful implementation (Kozleski & Smith, 2009). In the field, however, there remains the debate about where SWSD should be educated, constituting what Kleinhammer-Tramill, Burrello, and Sailor (2012) call ?the identity crisis of special education? (p. 6). While the Secretary of Education affirms that ?[i]n all cases, placement decisions must be individually determined on the basis of each child?s abilities and needs and each child?s IEP, and not solely on factors such as category of disability, severity of disability, availability of special education and related services, configuration of the service delivery system, availability of space, or administrative convenience? (Assistance to States, 2006, p. 46588), school districts continue to make ?placement decisions? based upon the most dangerous assumptions about students and their capacity for learning and demonstrating their knowledge. Subsequently, SWSD continue to be segregated and denied the very rights enshrined in special education law, perpetuating poor postschool outcomes and largely segregated postschool lives. This research interrogates policy and other systemic ways that students are labeled as disabled and segregated, and excluded based on meanings that society, schools, and teachers ascribe to markers of difference (Collins, 2013; Ferri & Connor, 2005). We seek to challenge the ableism inherent in decision-making around policies related to placement and provision of special education services for SWSD. We aim to highlight potential state policy frameworks that facilitate the inclusion of SWSD. This has the potential to expand the capacity of school leaders and policymakers to refine policies and practices to increase the likelihood of improved outcomes.

Speakers
JM

Julia M. White

Assistant Professor, Syracuse University


Thursday December 3, 2015 8:20am - 9:10am
Mt Hood 1414 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

8:20am

Supporting Families in transition through a Culture of Gentleness
Limited Capacity filling up

Transition into adulthood is a complex situation for the person, as well as their family. When Person-Centered practices are being used, there are often conflicts that arise between family members and other supporters. This presentation will will focus on how person centered planning practices can be used in conjunction with a Culture of Gentleness to support a young person and their family. Through personal stories that illustrate these principles, we will show how focusing on relationships and a desire for success and growth, we can meet the needs of everyone involved. OBJECTIVES: 1. After this session, participants will be able to define the Six Elements of a Culture of Gentleness. 2. After this session, participants will be able to summarize how the 4 Pillars of a Culture of Gentleness can be used to support person centered practices. 3. After this session, participants will be able to develop a team that can utilize these principles to support someone in transition.

Speakers

Thursday December 3, 2015 8:20am - 9:10am
Salon H 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

8:20am

RPSD Associate Editor Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

Associate Editors will meet to discuss the status of the journal and make plans for the coming year.

Moderators
SK

Stacy K Dymond

Professor | Department of Special Education | University of Illinois

Thursday December 3, 2015 8:20am - 9:10am
Salon B 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

8:20am

Virginia TASH Chapter Meeting
Virginia TASH members are spread out across the state. The Annual Conference is an opportunity for us to meet up and plan together for the comming year.

Speakers

Thursday December 3, 2015 8:20am - 9:10am
Portland 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

8:20am

Focus on Research: Positive Behavior Supports and Families
Limited Capacity seats available

Fredda Brown and Jacki Anderson will be hosting the panel. Invited researchers include: Mark Durand, Lise Fox, Joe Lucyshen, and Glen Dunlap. 

Extra supports are sometimes needed in order to improve quality of life for individuals with disabilities and their families. This panel will present the latest research in this area. Panel presenters are nationally recognized experts in this area. The invited researchers will discuss how the research results can be applied into home and community settings. As a result of this session participants will be able to (A) Identify three current trends in research focusing on families and PBS; and
(B) Discuss future directions for research on families and PBS.


Thursday December 3, 2015 8:20am - 9:10am
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

8:20am

Sound the Alarm: Addressing the Ongoing Crisis in Communication Services and Supports
Limited Capacity seats available

Current evidence suggests that many persons with significant support needs are not receiving the supports and services they require to communicate successfully across environments. In schools, individuals are being denied access to successful supports because they are not deemed "evidence based" while other individuals are denied access because they are required to demonstrate competence before given an opportunity to learn. In this session, panel members will review the existing evidence, describe existing legislation and guidance related to the crisis, and call participants to action in continuing 40 years of progressive leadership by joining a work group to address the crisis.

Objectives: As a result of this session participants will be able to:
1. describe trends in the recent research related to the communication skills of school-aged students with significant support needs.
2. identify reasons why the ongoing crisis in communication services and supports exist.
3. describe one or more actions or activities that might effectively address the crisis and increase access to appropriate communication services and supports.

Speakers
avatar for Sue Swenson

Sue Swenson

Deputy Assistant Secretary, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services
avatar for Barb Trader

Barb Trader

Executive Director, TASH
Barb Trader is Executive Director of TASH, a progressive advocacy organization that advances inclusion and human rights of people with significant disabilities and complex needs. In her role at TASH, Barb leads APRAIS (Alliance for Prevention of Restraint, Aversive Intervention and Seclusion), a 32-member alliance of national non-profits with a mission to eliminate aversive interventions. She serves on the Board and is treasurer of the... Read More →
avatar for Huan Voung

Huan Voung

Huan Vuong is 18 years old, a student at Wakefield High School in Arlington, VA. After years of silence, Huan now has found his true voice with Rapid Prompting Method (RPM). He is a leader in the Autism community and an advocate for those who still do not have a voice.


Thursday December 3, 2015 8:20am - 10:10am
Salon I 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

9:20am

An Online Community to Support Individuals with Complex Communication Needs
Limited Capacity filling up

Family members and professionals who support individuals with complex communication needs (CCN) are often challenged in finding high quality, accessible resources in local communities. To address this need, a free, virtual Communication Matrix (CM) community has been launched. The CM Community includes many features that users will find useful in supporting individuals with CCN. Attendees will be introduced to this open and unique use of technology as an intervention for professionals and family members that provides just in time tools to support people with CCN.. OBJECTIVES: By the end of the session, participants will be able to a) Describe 3 benefits of participating in communities of practice b) Connect with professionals and parents from around the country to learn from and help them in their work supporting individuals with CCN. c) Identify 2 resources available on the Communication Matrix Community of Practice that improve the participant?s practice.

Speakers
avatar for Alexandria Cook

Alexandria Cook

Oregon Health & Science University
avatar for Amy Parker

Amy Parker

Coordinator, National Center on Deaf-Blindness
I love working with video and creating open access products that help educators and families. My older sister is a dear friend and happens to have multiple disabilities including deafblindness. I consider my sister my first teacher. I feel lucky to work in the field of deafblindness and special education.


Thursday December 3, 2015 9:20am - 10:10am
Salon C 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

9:20am

Collaborating Through Change: Portland's Employment First Seamless Transition Project
Limited Capacity seats available

Learn from Portland's Employment First Seamless Transition Pilot Project. We've been on a journey to increase the number of students exiting school transition programs that are making a smooth & seamless transition to competitive employment of choice. We have created a team approach to support students and families with this exciting life change. We will discuss our model, what has and has not been successful and how you might create a similar team within your transition program. Over 50% of the students exiting the CTC program in June 2015 were employed. Our panel will include a Transition Teacher, Employment Specialist and an employed graduate. OBJECTIVES: By the end of this session participants should be able to: In the end session participants should be able to: 1. Use practical strategies to facilitate collaboration between agencies or individuals tasked with seamless transition or creating competitive employment outcomes. 2. Recognize barriers that derail seamless transition outcomes. 3. Identify the essential features that underpin either a seamless transition or competitive employment outcome (e.g. roles and responsibilities, transportation, soft skills, motivation to work, work incentives, etc.).

Speakers
avatar for Heidi Dirkse-Graw

Heidi Dirkse-Graw

President/CEO, Dikrse Counseling & Consulting, Inc.
Heidi is President and CEO of Dirkse Counseling & Consulting, Inc., a company of 23 employees who mission is to bridge the gap between job seekers who experience disability and business by seeking both-win solutions to meet business need. | | In the last two years, Heidi and her team have been integrally involved in Oregon's Seamless Transition Pilot which focuses on working collaboratively with three different school districts to help... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Statham

Sarah Statham

Transition Coordinator, Centennial Transition Center
Sarah is the Transition Coordinator and teacher for the Centennial Transition Center (CTC). She has been teaching for over 17 years and has been with the Centennial School District since 2001. | The CTC has participated in Oregon’s Seamless Transition Project for over two years. This has given Sarah and the students of CTC the opportunity to develop a model and plan that can allow students to find their job of choice before leaving... Read More →


Thursday December 3, 2015 9:20am - 10:10am
Sunstone 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

9:20am

Ensuring a Well-Rounded Education: Promoting Student Participation in Extracurricular Activities
Limited Capacity seats available

Although extracurricular activities provide potentially rich opportunities for students to enhance their learning, socially interact with peers, and promote their self-determination, few students with severe disabilities participate in these activities. This research project examined the extent to which students participate in extracurricular activities, the kinds of activities available, and the obstacles they and their parents may face when planning. Also, semi-structured interviews of a sample of teachers, students, and parents were conducted to share their opinions about extracurricular activities. Recommendations to increase student involvement are presented. OBJECTIVES: +T2 IMPORTANCE: Inclusion and community building include students? full participation in school and community activities. Nevertheless, research suggests that few students participate in school or community-based activities. To ensure that students are fully accepted into their schools and communities, participation in extracurricular activities represents a research topic that warrants further examination. TRANSLATING TOPIC INTO IMPROVED OUTCOMES:Participation in extracurricular activities represents a potentially rich and reinforcing experience for students with severe disabilities. Such activities provide opportunities for students to interact with peers, practice IEP skills, and exercise their self-determination. Although the value of extracurricular activities is supported in research, it remains uncertain how many students with severe disabilities do indeed participate. Also, it is unknown what teachers have done to promote student participation and the extent to which parents have requested their assistance at IEP meetings. Last, and most importantly, there is no research reported on the opinions of students regarding extracurricular activities. To ensure that students have a satisfying and well-rounded education, they need to provide input (voice) on this topic Many teachers (and parents) restrict inclusive practice and access to the general curriculum to activities, largely academic, conducted in classrooms during the school day. Nevertheless, to ensure that students have a well-rounded and satisfying educational experience that allows for both academic skill development and social interaction, there has been recent discussion of Access to the General Education to include the full range of activities and instruction in the school and community; that is, both general education classes and after school activities (e.g., extracurricular activities). These activities provide opportunities for students to exercise their self-determination, make choices, interact with peers, socially network, work on IEP goals, and practice and generalize academic and functional skills. Additionally, student participation in extracurricular activities provides a useful measure of inclusiveness and community building. Although there is a growing body of literature relative to access, little has been written about student participation in extracurricular activities--in particular, for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The available data suggest relatively few students with intellectual disability participate in extracurricular activities. Also, it is unknown what particular obstacles or barriers do students or their parents face when planning for such activities. Further, it is uncertain how many students and/or their parents request assistance at IEP meetings when planning for extracurricular activities. The proposal will include specific recommendations to teachers and parents on how to involve students with severe disabilities more fully in extracurricular activities; how to support these students; the leisure/recreational options available to them, how to identify student preferences; and how to ensure that extracurricular activities are included in IEPs. The proposal build upon and extends preliminary data presented at the 2014 TASH conference.This information will hopefully produce improved educational outcomes.


Thursday December 3, 2015 9:20am - 10:10am
Columbia 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

9:20am

Families Supporting Community Relationships for Their Adult Children Living At Home
Limited Capacity filling up

The last 40 years has seen a tremendous increase in physical inclusion of people with disabilities. However, the need for social inclusion remains pressing and requires new leadership. Successful methods to promote community relationships have been used in residential settings, yet most people with disabilities live with their families. Children are integrated in school, yet parents decry the social isolation that happens after graduation. This presentation presents a study conducted with adult children living with their families and how strategies successfully used by agency staff are being adapted by family members to increase the community relationships of their adult children. OBJECTIVES: By the end of the session, participants will be able to: 1. Identify at least 3 ways to support social inclusion and community relationships for adults, young adults and transition age students living at home. 2. Identify at least 2 ways to support families to support the social inclusion of their adult children. 3. Distinguish at least 2 ways to overcome barriers which families experience to supporting social inclusion of their adult children. 4. Define three ways to define successful outcomes of social inclusion (relationships with community members, joining community groups/associations, and valued social roles in community life) IMPORTANCE: There is a great deal of literature on social inclusion in school environments, but no studies on supporting such inclusion as students transition to adult life. Most literature about supporting social inclusion is on what school or agency staff can do, but virtually nothing about what families can do. TRANSLATING TOPIC INTO NEW OUTCOMES:Many parents lament decreases in social relationships once their children graduate. Parents are often hungry to support more relationships happening for their children. Outcomes include both more relationships and belonging for the adult children, but also more inclusion for the parents. Social relationships can lead to more employment, satisfaction, health, and valued social roles. Research about adults with intellectual disabilities, especially severe disabilities, indicates that their social networks consist primarily of others with disabilities and paid staff. For those living with their families, relationships for the individual with disabilities are often only relationships of the other family members. Supporting the individual's own social relationships with ordinary community members will decrease the likelihood that they will end up with these constricted social networks, and adults will end up with a social network consisting primarily of other people with disabilities and paid staff. Improved outcomes will include identification of strategies that can be used by other families, development of a manual that can be used by other families, and many individuals with severe disabilities having more relationships with community members. In addition, there will be improved outcomes for community members who befriend these individuals.

Speakers

Thursday December 3, 2015 9:20am - 10:10am
Eugene 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

9:20am

Getting Past the Stupid Questions
Limited Capacity seats available

For too long, people with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities have been burdened by low expectations, decreased opportunities and denied rights. This session will challenge people to answer the "stupid questions" people with IDD face every day, like "what makes you think you can do that?" "why do you want to work?" "how can you live and work independently?" The answers to all of them are: "Getting Past the Stupid Questions"  will focus on Supported Decision-Making and how it can be the difference between a life of rights, inclusion, and progress and one of outside-imposed limitations and denials.


Thursday December 3, 2015 9:20am - 10:10am
Meadowlark 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

9:20am

Is It Really Positive Behavior Support?
Limited Capacity seats available

The Positive Behavior Support (PBS) model of intervention is ?best practice? in respectful behavior support. A cottage industry is developing in the area of supporting individuals with problem behavior. Some entrepreneurs/consultants are marketing their services as PBS experts without the knowledge or skills to provide this model of support. Presenters will provide an overview of the Standards of Practice for Individual PBS. Strategies for using these standards to evaluate the skills of potential employees/consultants, the quality of PBS services, training programs etc. will be discussed. Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions, tell their stories, and discuss the standards. OBJECTIVES: As a result of the session participants will be able to: 1. Locate PBS Standards of practice and other PBS resources The Standards of Practice are comprehensive & address all components of PBS assessment and intervention, the values driving these practices and the knowledge and skills required for practitioners to claim ?expertise? in this model. Participants will receive copies of the general categories of practices in the standards and links to the full comprehensive standards and other PBS resources. 2. Use Standards of Practice to: ? assess the skills of potential employees/consultants, ? evaluate the quality of PBS services families, self-advocates, educators and service providers or individuals they support have received, ? evaluate inservice training or university programs ? guide development of training or certificate programs ? discuss the differences between ABA and PBS models of intervention ? articulate specific PBS assessment and intervention strategies The PBS model of behavior support is consistent with TASH values and priorities. It is respectful of the individual and those around him or her, is applicable across diverse backgrounds and perspectives, promotes active participation in inclusive environments, and positively impacts all aspects of life across the life span. The work of the TASH Positive Approaches committee has been an important influence in the development of the PBS model and advocacy for availability PBS practices to ALL who may need behavioral support. Long-time TASH members were instrumental in the development of both the Association for Positive Behavior Support (APBS) and the PBS Standards of Practice for supporting individuals whose disabling conditions include problem behavior. This session is consistent with this year?s conference theme, ?Celebrating 40 Years of Progressive Leadership,? acknowledging TASH's 40 years of generating change within the disability community and anticipates a brighter, more inclusive future for people with disabilities in all aspects of life.


Thursday December 3, 2015 9:20am - 10:10am
Pearl 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

9:20am

It Is Never Too Late to Dream of New Possibilities!
Limited Capacity seats available

Dylan will share lessons he learned while being fully included from preschool to college. Families and self-advocates will learn to take their vision of an inclusive life after high school and make it happen! Dylan will share his humor and honesty as he tells his story of inclusion. Hear the perspective of a dynamic young adult with significant support needs and leave energized and ready to take on the world again! OBJECTIVES: At the end of this session, participants will be able to: a) identify at least seven extraordinary gifts their child has, or they have as a self-advocate b) describe examples of how students with significant support needs can be included from preschool to college c) define 3 concrete ways parents and self-advocates can make their goals a reality


Thursday December 3, 2015 9:20am - 10:10am
Salon D 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

9:20am

Literacy together: Examination of a peer-supported comprehension enhancement strategy
Limited Capacity seats available

Access to age-appropriate literacy is essential for all students, yet often inaccessible for students with significant disabilities. This study explores the effect of the picture plus discussion (PPD) intervention delivered collaboratively among students with and without disabilities. Results indicate effectiveness of this inclusive teaching strategy in increasing access to and comprehension of age-appropriate texts read aloud. OBJECTIVES: +T2 IMPORTANCE: Access to literacy is an essential part of everyday life, however individuals with significant disabilities often experience limited access (e.g., Browder et al., 2009). This study addresses the current need for increased research on academic content for students with significant disabilities in inclusive settings (Shurr & Bouck, 2013). TRANSLATING TOPIC INTO IMPROVED OUTCOMES:Access to opportunities, instruction, materials, and experiences that support literacy engagement for students with moderate and severe disabilities are generally lacking (Browder et al., 2009, Kliewer, C., Biklen, D., & Kasa-Hendrickson, C., 2006 and Kliewer, 1998). In addition to an overall lack of access to literature instruction and materials for students with moderate and severe disabilities, materials that are present are often not representative of the student?s chronological age (Browder, Trela, & Jimenez, 2007) or are altered versions of the original texts (Shurr & Taber-Doughty, 2012). This study describes the positive outcomes of a follow-up study on an intervention described by Shurr & Taber-Doughty (2012) combining the use of pictures and discussion (PPD) to increase the comprehension abilities of elementary school students with significant disabilities. In this present study, elementary students were read age-appropriate texts aloud along with a peer to assess the effectiveness of modeling to increase comprehension and activity intervention during this intervention. Due to a limited supply of adapted age appropriate texts, and the inherent reduction of relevant information in these materials, using typical texts along with the PPD intervention can allow access to a vast pool of texts for these students with minimal preparation on the part of the teacher. Additionally, expanding the previous use of this intervention adds to the emerging research base for the PPD intervention to extend into inclusive settings. During this presentation practitioners will hear a detailed description of the intervention used in the study as well as participant characteristics and materials used. Introduction to the intervention used in this study could help practitioners, including current and prospective teachers as well as teacher educators, open access for their students to a wider variety of age appropriate texts.

Thursday December 3, 2015 9:20am - 10:10am
Douglas 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

9:20am

Modeling Augmentative Communication to Replace Challenging Behaviors
Limited Capacity filling up

Four case studies involving two elementary students and two adults with communication disabilities are presented. The established practices of Functional Communication Training (FCT) and modeling were used to teach them to use an iPad to communicate their needs and improve their engagement. Innovative methods using video to assess the function of problem behaviors for the students are presented. This presentation offers effective and efficient procedures that can be used by multi-disciplinary teams to improve the communication of individuals with communicative needs. OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe efficient procedures for identifying the function of problem behaviors 2. Identify procedures for modeling the use of AAC to improve communication and reduce problem behaviors in individuals with communicative disabilities. 3. Identify procedures for modeling the use of AAC to improve core vocabulary in individuals with communicative disabilities. IMPORTANCE: TRANSLATING TOPIC INTO IMPROVED OUTCOMES:

Speakers
avatar for Samuel Sennott

Samuel Sennott

Assistant Professor, Universal Design Lab/ Portland State University
Samuel Sennott, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Special Education at Portland State University (PSU). Dr. Sennott is the founder of the new Universal Design Lab at PSU, which is focused on innovative research, teaching, and community service. In summary, his research work focuses on serving individuals with disabilities through using Universal Design for Learning and assistive technologies. Dr. Sennott’s background includes a Master’s... Read More →


Thursday December 3, 2015 9:20am - 10:10am
Salon H 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

9:20am

Parent to Parent Support for the 21st Century: Online Training and Support
Limited Capacity seats available

Traditionally, Parent to Parent (P2P) has provided peer support through close matches between a help-seeking parent of a child with a disability or healthcare need and a trained veteran parent. Support was given over several telephone conversations during which veteran parents employed active listening techniques, imparted positivity through the sharing of stories and provided valuable informational support gained through similar experiences. Recently however, some states have begun to deliver training using webinar or online modules. Additionally many disability-focused groups, including some P2Ps maintain online support platforms. Research on the use of technology and the mission of P2P will be presented. OBJECTIVES: 1. Understand the mission of Parent to Parent USA 2. Understand the benefits and drawbacks of online training. 3. Understand the benefits and drawbacks of online support. 4. Brainstorm models of online training and support which align with the needs and mission of P2P USA. IMPORTANCE: Volunteer organizations which are sensitive to the needs and priorities of young families will continue their mission. Therefore, it is crucial that best practices of volunteer service organizations be reevaluated for younger and more diverse populations in order to remain relevant to those they serve and provide effective support.TRANSLATING TOPIC INTO POSITIVE OUTCOMES: It is known that peer support reduces isolation and stress in parents of children with disabilities, improving overall well-being and functioning of the family. Simplifying access to high-quality emotional and informational support for parents could lead to more families adapting successfully to life with a child with a disability and better outcomes for their children, including increased inclusion in school and community.

Speakers
avatar for Robin Dodds

Robin Dodds

Clinical Research Project Manager, Northwestern University
Mom, advocate, P2P Board Member, researcher.


Thursday December 3, 2015 9:20am - 10:10am
Salmon 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

9:20am

Professional Considerations for Supporting Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Families
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will provide professionals with practical considerations for better serving culturally and linguistically diverse families based on current research. Participants will also engage in a collaborative planning process and will walk away with some tools to help implement change within their programs, agencies or classrooms.. OBJECTIVES: Participants will understand the basic principals of current research and literature on serving families from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds including the concept of 'Special Education' as a culture rooted in American values as well as the process of cultural reciprocity. Participants will understand practical applications of these concepts and discuss how these ideas impacts their role as professionals. Participants will engage in a collaborative process using a planning tool that will help them or their agency take systematic steps towards better serving CLD families.

Speakers
avatar for Natalie Holdren

Natalie Holdren

TEP Faculty & Doctoral Student, UC Santa Barbara
Inclusive Education, Cultural & Linguistic Competence, Evidence-Based Practices, Literacy Instruction


Thursday December 3, 2015 9:20am - 10:10am
Medford 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

9:20am

Successful Inclusive Practices: Just Keep Swimming, Just Keep Swimming
Limited Capacity seats available

Successful engagement in inclusive practices can seem overwhelming at the local school level unless there is a District-wide commitment and expectation. Rosedale Elementary, in Hillsboro, Oregon has become a positive example of inclusive practices for students with significant support needs. From District administration to the general education classroom successful processes have been put in place that are creating positive daily learning environments for all students. This presentation offers participants the opportunity to examine the process on multiple required levels of commitment: District Administration, Local School Administration, Local School Team, School Staff and Parents. OBJECTIVES: Participants will: 1. be able to define and distinguish the likelihood of successful inclusion on the local level based upon the level of obvious and stated commitment toward inclusive practices at the district level 2. utilize practical examples of creating daily guidelines for the process 3. produce options for positive inclusive opportunities based upon universal designs for learning and critical examples of the process at all levels. 4. be able to articulate and maintain the needed components of the process from the Big Picture of district commitment to the everyday experiences of the school team


Thursday December 3, 2015 9:20am - 10:10am
Salon G 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

9:20am

Teaching Mathematical Problem Solving and Generalization Through Simulated Real-Life Video Modeling
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Fred Spooner

Fred Spooner

Professor, UNC Charlotte
Fred Spooner (Ph.D., University of Florida) is a Professor in the Department of Special Education, and Child Development and Principal Investigator on a Personnel Preparation Project involving distance delivery technologies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and Co-Principal Investigator on a U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences (IES), Project to teach students with moderate/severe intellectual disability... Read More →


Thursday December 3, 2015 9:20am - 10:10am
Mt Hood 1414 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

9:20am

The iPad - A Gateway Technology to Greater Independence and Social Connection
Limited Capacity full

As a form of mainstream technology, the iPad has been revolutionary in terms of its accessibility to a variety of people including individuals with disabilities. This presentation will discuss the different ways that the iPad and related technologies can support greater independence and social connection for adults with disabilities. Examples of apps in the areas of internet access, reading, writing, communication, recreation and time management will be demonstrated. A self-advocate who has used an iPad extensively for communication and employment will share his experiences.. OBJECTIVES:?Explain why access to technologies like the iPad are essential to independent living and inclusion in the community ?Describe the different ways in which iPad technology can be used to increase a a person?s independence and social interaction in everyday life ?Identify the key elements of support that are necessary for a person to effectively use iPads ?Identify possible barriers to the use of iPads with adults with developmental disabilities ?Identify iPad applications in the areas of communication, literacy and independent living that can be used with adults

Speakers
PC

Pascal Cheng

Communication Specialist, Howard Center


Thursday December 3, 2015 9:20am - 10:10am
Salon B 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

9:20am

Evidence Based Practices for Supporting Families: Review, Mets-analysis & Evaluation
Limited Capacity seats available

This Research and Publication Committee panel will present a recent meta-analysis and critical review of research on evidence based practices aimed at supporting parents of individuals with severe disabilities. Four groups of evidence based studies will be presented: psychoeducational group supports, multi-component interventions, applied behavior analysis interventions, and positive behavior support. Implications for services and policy will discussed along with limitations in this large body of research. Extensive research indicates that roughly one in three parents of children with developmental disabilities experience elevated depressive symptoms and high levels of stress. A large body of research now exists on interventions to support parents. This is the first meta-analysis and critical review of this literature identifying EBP's. This information is directly useful for service providers, policy makers, parents, and for their children. It identifies the kinds of interventions that are supported by sufficient data to be labeled as established EBP's and thereby offers guidance about ways to intervene when parents request help and the kinds of services that policy should enable. The comprehensive review of the published literature brought to light four sets of interventions that meet current standards as either promising or established evidence based practices: psycho-educational programs, applied behavior analysis interventions, multiple-components intervention, and positive behavior support. The psycho-educational interventions category includes group programs for stress management, coping skills training, and cognitive behavioral therapy. A meta analysis was conducted on all studies that reported randomized group comparison studies with control groups. The effect sizes and their confidence intervals indicated consistently effective interventions but with significant beneficial impacts but these were weaker than outcomes found in the general psychotherapy literature for adult problems. The review identified serious limitations in the research literature pertaining to the limited characteristics of the participants including only small percentages of diverse and low income parents and fathers.
There are few published studies of follow-ups so the longterm impact of these interventions is largely unknown.
The findings indicate that service providers now have an array of effective practices for supporting parents. They provide an important message to researchers and funders of research about the need for longer term evaluations and studies including a more diverse sample of participants. Taken as a whole the literature review and synthesis indicates that valuable progress has been made in developing effective interventions over the past forty years. At the same time it points out the need for better more powerful practices and for evaluation studies that have participants who are more representative of the contemporary US. The study indicates that PBS is highly promising as a form of family support and that relatively new uses of mindfulness based stress management practices are effective.
1. Participants will be able to identify the major forms of interventions for parents that meet standards for evidence based practices.
2. Participants will be able to characterize these sets of interventions and their effectiveness.
3. Participants will understand current standards in determining practices that are evidence based and issues that arise in evaluating them.


Thursday December 3, 2015 9:20am - 10:10am
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

9:20am

Listening Session: HCBS Settings Rule Implementation in YOUR State
Limited Capacity seats available

The new Home and Community Based Settings (HCBS) Waiver Rule went into effect in January of 2014 and is in the process of being implemented by states. This Rule includes a prohibition against the use of HCBS Waiver funds to provide services in “Settings that Isolate” to improve access to community life. This results of this promising public policy change hinges on how the Rule is implemented by states. This Listening Session provides participants an opportunity to share your experiences and observations about state Rule implementation with federal representatives who can provide clarity and use your input to inform implementation. This is a Listening Session, and participants will share what they are experiencing in states and learn from each other.

Moderators
avatar for Serena Lowe

Serena Lowe

Senior Policy Advisor, Office of Disability Employment Policy
avatar for Clyde  Terry

Clyde Terry

Chair, National Council on Disability

Thursday December 3, 2015 9:20am - 11:10am
Portland 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

9:20am

Afternoon of a Faun: Tanaquil Le Clercq
Limited Capacity seats available

Afternoon of a Faun: Tanaquil Le Clercq tells the story of Tanaquil "Tanny" Le Clercq, one of the greatest dancers in American ballet, who was tragically stricken by polio at the height of her career. 

With a soul-stirring soundtrack and exquisite visuals, award-winning filmmaker Nancy Buirski brings to the screen the magnificent story of one of the great ballerinas Tanaquil Le Clercq who was struck down by polio and paralyzed

Afternoon of a Faun:
Tanaquil Le Clercq, by award-winning director Nancy Buirski, tells the dramatic story of Tanaquil "Tanny" Le Clercq, one of the greatest dancers in the history of the American ballet, who was tragically stricken by polio at the height of her career. Tanny inspired genius choreographers George Balanchine and Jerome Robbins, but the tragedy that she experienced through her illness proved her true power and strength.  A personal, electrifying story like Tanny’s shines light on universal issues of sickness and survival. Aging and affliction spare no one – no matter how privileged or accomplished. Pain is part of our humanity, and the ability to accept our limitations is something we can all relate to.

Of the great ballerinas, Tanaquil Le Clercq (known to all as “Tanny”) may have been the most transcendent. She mesmerized viewers and choreographers alike - her elongated, race-horse physique became the new prototype for the great George Balanchine. The muse to both Balanchine and Jerome Robbins, they loved her as a dancer and a woman. Balanchine married her and Robbins created his famous AFTERNOON OF A FAUN for Tanny. She was the foremost dancer of her day until it suddenly all stopped. At age 27, Tanny was struck down by polio and paralyzed. She never danced again.

"With its extraordinary footage and a story replete with tragic ironies, Nancy Buirski's documentary on famed prima ballerina Tanaquil Le Clercq often soars" - Variety



Thursday December 3, 2015 9:20am - 11:10am
Salon A 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

10:20am

Achieving Inclusive Post-Secondary Education Through Interdisciplinary Collaboration
Limited Capacity seats available

During this presentation university faculty, staff, students, and other key stakeholders (e.g., families, community members) will discuss how they collaborate to ensure the rigor and success of SUCCEED, a post-secondary program for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Presenters will provide tips, strategies, and lessons learned for individuals interested in attending, developing , or enhancing an inclusive post-secondary university program. OBJECTIVES: -identify the importance of inclusive post-secondary education. -identify the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration to ensure the success of post-secondary education. -identify key components that lead to successful collaboration between faculty, staff, students, and key stakeholders. -have tools they can immediately use to cultivate collaborative partnerships with multiple stakeholders to advance inclusive, meaningful post-secondary education for all students.


Thursday December 3, 2015 10:20am - 11:10am
Mt Hood 1414 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

10:20am

Assuming Competence: Philosophical Basis for Research in Access to the General Curriculum
Limited Capacity seats available

Using best-practices and supports that apply the least dangerous assumption (LDA) is a powerful tool for increasing overall student quality of life and keeping alive a vision of high achievement for all students. This presentation will focus on research and evidence based strategies to promote the LDA for students with significant disabilities regarding accessing personally relevant academic instruction with meaningful student centered outcomes. OBJECTIVES: By the end of this session, participants will be able to: a) identify four criteria to promote Least Dangerous Assumption b) discuss ways to successfully implement the four criteria in their classroom to meet the needs of a wide range of diverse students with significant disabilities c) identify resources that incorporate these four criteria and are applicable to students from diverse backgrounds

Speakers
avatar for Bree Jimenez

Bree Jimenez

Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Dr. Bree Jimenez is an assistant professor of special education at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Dr. Jimenez has worked in the field of low-incidence disability for over 15 years. Dr. Jimenez designs and conducts research in the area of general curriculum access, specifically in adapted literature, mathematics, and inquiry science. She has published a book and written multiple textbooks chapters surrounding general curriculum... Read More →
avatar for Pamela Mims

Pamela Mims

Associate Professor, East Tennessee State University
Systematic Instructional, Access to the General Education Curriculum, Alignment, ABA


Thursday December 3, 2015 10:20am - 11:10am
Salon D 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

10:20am

Building an Inclusive Faith Community
Limited Capacity seats available

Religion plays a critical role in the lives of many people. Faith communities can provide a natural support to people with disabilities and their families, providing both practical and spiritual aid. However, people with disabilities continue to be underrepresented in churches. People with disabilities and their families sometimes feel unwelcomed or marginalized in our churches. Pastors report feeling ill equipped to meet the needs of parishioners with disabilities. This study will identify to what extend seminaries prepare pastors to minister to people with disabilities and discuss ways to influence greater understanding between faith leaders, people with disabilities and families. OBJECTIVES: 1). Examine the potential positive outcomes for participation in faith communities. 2). Understand the extent to which seminaries prepare pastors to meet the needs of parishioners with disabilities. 3). Discuss some common barriers people with disabilities and their families experience to active participation in faith communities. 4). Examine ways to influence greater understanding and welcome of people with disabilities and their families with our churches. IMPORTANCE: Church congregations influence and are influenced by the broader culture. Seminaries have the potential to equip thousands of clergy to positively impact people. It is critical to understand the existing gaps in the preparation of future ministers to meet the practical and spiritual needs of all members of their congregation. TRANSLATING TOPIC INTO NEW OUTCOMES:Historically people with disabilities have found the church to be both a place of refuge and condemnation (Anderson, 2006; Ault, Collins, & Carter, 2013; Creamer, 2006). At times pastors and worship leaders unintentionally still perpetuate unrealistic images of people with disabilities as pitiful or inspirational, and use language uncritically that is often seen as offensive to people with disabilities (Creamer, 2006). Religious congregations are predominately made up of people without disabilities. However with education and support to learn about the needs of people with disability and their families, congregation generally demonstrate an openness to improve the conditions of their fellow human beings. Churches can provide practical, social and emotional supports to people within their congregations increasing their sense of belonging and community participation. The presence of individuals with disabilities can equally benefit the congregation through the sharing of their gifts and increasing the understanding of general human diversity. An understanding of the existing education that pastors receive during their seminary training is critical to identify the influences or educational gaps which exist in the preparation of future ministers to meet the practical and spiritual needs of all members of their congregation including those with disabilities and their families. By examining the common barriers that exist within faith communities, people with disabilities, their family members and service providers can begin to address these barriers and communicate their needs to their religious leaders and faith partners. The potential and desire to include all members of the community exists within the church walls and is a fundamental religious teaching for most faith communities. The practical application of this inclusive desire must be taught and examined.

Speakers
TB

Tammy Bachrach

PHD Student/Teacher, Chapman University
I am interested in helping faith communities welcome and foster full participation of people with disabilities into thier congregations and spiritual families.


Thursday December 3, 2015 10:20am - 11:10am
Eugene 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

10:20am

Cancelled: Collaborative planning and integrated service delivery for students with related service needs
Limited Capacity seats available

TASH has been a leader in inclusive schooling, yet children and youth with the most significant support needs, and often with specialized health care needs, are still taught in some of the most segregated programs. Sometimes school leaders, teachers, and family members inaccurately assume that these needs cannot be met within inclusive schools/classrooms. This presentation will provide collaborative strategies for coordinating related services as a support to inclusive education; and, strategies for integrating service delivery. Examples will be shared and perspectives from teachers, parents, and related service providers will be shared. OBJECTIVES: As a result of this session participants will be able to: 1. Understand how to write an integrated IEP which is developed by a collaborative team; 2. Understand how therapy can be integrated within and across the school day in functional and natural situations; 3. Gain insight into parent, educator, and therapy perspectives, and how these need to be collaboratively coordinated in an inclusive school.


Thursday December 3, 2015 10:20am - 11:10am
Douglas 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

10:20am

Creating Partnerships for Systems Change
Limited Capacity full

The District of Columbia?s Department on Disability Services has worked closely with people with disabilities, their families, and public and private partners to successfully create opportunities for employment and community inclusion for youth and adults with disabilities. This interactive session will highlight the strategies, activities and partnerships that have resulted in cross-system collaboration and true systems change within the developmental disabilities and vocational rehabilitation systems and beyond. Presenters will provide an overview of DC's cross-disability system-transformation activities to promote and support Employment First and provider transformation over the past few years.. OBJECTIVES:1. Create and effectively participate in partnerships to promote cross-system, cross-disabilities collaborations that result in collective impact 2. Partner with others to create systems change at the individual, program and system levels for youth and adults with disabilities to promote Employment First, informed choice, and community integration. 3. Advocate for strategies and approaches to support provider transformation that results in increased employment and community inclusion. 4. Engage in discussions, serve on advisory and work groups, and share useful resources to promote Employment First.

Speakers
avatar for Erin Leveton

Erin Leveton

Director, State Office of Disability Adminstration, Department on Disability Services
Erin Leveton is the Program Manager of the State Office of Disability Administration at the District of Columbia Department on Disability Services, supporting the agency in policy and legislative affairs, program development, stakeholder relations, and helping DDS to accelerate gains in performance and best practice in areas such as Employment First, Person Centered Thinking, community integration, and self-determination/ supported... Read More →


Thursday December 3, 2015 10:20am - 11:10am
Salem 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

10:20am

Learning about Sexuality from Young Woman with Intellectual Disabilities
Limited Capacity full

The sexual rights and needs of individuals with intellectual disabilities have received increased attention in the past several decades, and their importance has been highlighted in a number of international policy documents . However, there is a dearth of research in this area. The purpose of this presentation is to share data from the three repeated focus group interviews, on the role of familial culture in understanding of sexuality by young women with intellectual disabilities. Besides that, this presentation also aims at presenting the various ways in which focus group research can be used to research sensitive topics. OBJECTIVES: 1. Participants will gain understanding about the role of familial culture in understanding of sexuality by young women with ID. 2. Participants will learn about the understanding of sexuality by young women with ID. 3. Learn about successful research methods used for the sensitive topic and the population. 4. Discuss the possibility of furthering research on the topic IMPORTANCE:Sexuality rights is considered as human rights for every individual. However, there is a dearth of research in the area of sexuality and intellectual disabilities, this research work is an important contribution within the literature focusing on sexual self-determination and creative research methodologies for sensitive topics. TRANSLATING TOPIC INTO IMPROVED OUTCOMES: This presentation aims at sharing the voice of women with intellectual disabilities coming from diverse cultural backgrounds. The research informs about their understanding, needs, and the role of familial culture in their understanding of sexuality. The information shared through this presentation can be seen as a catalyst for the future work in the area of sexuality for people with severe disabilities as well as training for service providers/ parents.

Speakers
avatar for Neera Malhotra-Gregory

Neera Malhotra-Gregory

Portland State University


Thursday December 3, 2015 10:20am - 11:10am
Salon H 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

10:20am

Opportunities to Learn (OTL) for Students with Extensive Learning Needs
Limited Capacity seats available

Research demonstrates that when students have opportunities to learn (OTL), their achievement improves, but what does it mean for students with extensive learning needs (SELN) to have opportunity? Typically, OTL research focuses on alignment among standards, curriculum and instructional content. However, for SELN OTL requires more precise analysis, including factors such as communication systems and alignment between supports and individual needs. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of the OTL research and make important connections to evidence-based practices for teaching SELN that will support the improvement of policy and practice and encourage future research. OBJECTIVES: In this presentation participants will: ? Understand the connections between the OTL research and evidence-based practices for teaching SELN ? Think about how the dimensions of OTL present opportunities to improve standards-aligned instruction for SELN ? Identify factors to examine and improve current instructional practices

Speakers
JM

Jessica McCord

Educational Consultant, ACERI Partners
avatar for Marcia Thomas

Marcia Thomas

Educational Consultant, Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network (PaTTAN)
I am currently an Educational Consultant with the Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network (PaTTAN) which is part of the Pennsylvania Department of Education. I work on several statewide special education initiatives: Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities, Inclusive Practices, Project MAX, Alternate Eligible Content and Procedural Safeguards. I have been in the field of special education for over 30 years as a teacher... Read More →


Thursday December 3, 2015 10:20am - 11:10am
Meadowlark 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

10:20am

Progressing through the Transition: Supported Decision-Making in Education
Limited Capacity seats available

In the Special Education Transition process, students should receive 5-7 of supports and services designed to help them progress toward independent, adult lives. Yet, a recent survey showed that schools and school personnel are the number one source of referrals for guardianship proceedings - which too often result in young adults having their rights stripped away and being denied the opportunity to progress. This presentation will provide practical information and strategies to access appropriate Transition supports and services designed to access and implement Supported Decision-Making processes designed to increase Self-Determination and progress toward true independence and inclusive adult living. OBJECTIVES: (1) Understand what should be in an appropriate Special Education Transition Plan (2) Understand how Transition Planning can provide independent living skills, decision-making supports, and other services and supports needed to help young adults progress toward inclusive, independent lives (3) Understand how Supported Decision-Making can increase self determination and improve life outcomes (4) Learn practical strategies for accessing and implementing Supported Decision-Making in the Transition Planning process and beyond.


Thursday December 3, 2015 10:20am - 11:10am
Salon G 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

10:20am

Provision of specialized health care services in schools
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will include a brief overview of specialized health care procedures that are sometimes required by students with complex health care needs. These procedures include tube feeding, suctioning, and ventilator care. OBJECTIVES:Describe rationale for use of particular specialized health care procedures. Develop a general understanding of the methods for providing the services. Develop an understanding of the levels of training necessary for provision of specialized care procedures

Speakers

Thursday December 3, 2015 10:20am - 11:10am
Salon I 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

10:20am

Supporting immigrant and refugee families through the Autism Equal Access Project
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will be about a 2-year long program targeting the needs of low-income, immigrant, refugee and other culturally and linguistically diverse families of children with Autism in south King County, WA. This project focused on the following areas to help families: 1) Access to knowledge about Autism; 2) Access to iPads as assistive technology; 3) Access to creating safe home environments; 4) Access to ABA therapy. Each area was addressed through different culturally responsive programs within the Autism Equal Access Project, including parent workshops, iPad parent training program, home repairs for low-income families and an in-home ABA support program.. OBJECTIVES: -Learn about programs that have been successful when working with and supporting immigrant, refugee and other culturally and linguistically diverse individuals with Autism and their families. - How to be culturally responsive when working with families of diverse backgrounds to access different services and resources -Understand more about the needs of immigrant and refugee families of children with Autism and how to support them more effectively

Speakers
SO

Sayaka Omori

Family Support Services Programs Manager, Open Doors for Multicultural Families


Thursday December 3, 2015 10:20am - 11:10am
Medford 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

10:20am

Using a Person Centered Approach to Adapt and Implement Self-Regulation Strategies
Limited Capacity filling up

Using person centered planning, consultants at CBI have adapted and successfully implemented a wide variety of self-regulation strategies, including progressive muscle relaxation, cognitive imagery, imagery scripts, 3-point scales, and self-monitoring tools. By incorporating information gained through the functional assessment of behavior, CBI has been highly successful in implementing personalized strategies that facilitate self-determination, personal empowerment, improved quality of life and higher levels of inclusion. OBJECTIVES: 1. Participants will learn how to use information gathered through person centered planning to adapt self-regulation strategies for the individuals served. 2. Participants will learn how to use the visual examples and video models provided to produce strategies to implement at home, school and in the community with individuals that they support. 3. Participants will discuss and learn how to adapt, design and blend self-regulation strategies with other positive behavior support strategies. For example 3-point scale and contingency mapping or Social Stories and self-monitoring, imagery scripts and Functional Communication Training.


Thursday December 3, 2015 10:20am - 11:10am
Pearl 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

10:20am

Using Assistive Technology To Build Career Readiness
Limited Capacity seats available

Summary: This workshop will look at the elements of career readiness in vocational tasks and soft skills addressing transition planning and implementation through post secondary options for a range of students who make use of Assistive Technology OBJECTIVES: Presentation Objectives: 1) Participants will define elements necessary for career readiness 2) Participants will explore AT solutions that can be implemented into daily curricular standards and skill acquisition for career readiness 3) Participants will create a scope and sequence of skills and application of skills for career tasks.

Speakers

Thursday December 3, 2015 10:20am - 11:10am
Columbia 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

10:20am

Workforce Innovations and Opportunity Act of 2014 News after 18 months
Limited Capacity full

Join a discussion at TASH about the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) of 2014. WIOA holds promise for national progress on competitive integrated employment (CIE) for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and others with significant disabilities. This Act provides a clear definition of competitive integrated employment, a new definition of supported employment and a definition of customized employment. Transition from school to work is emphasized. The Act also created and Advisory Committee for Increasing Competitive Integrated Employment for Individuals with Disabilities, established to advise the Secretary of Labor, and Congress on: ways to increase CIE, the use of Section 14  ( c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (sub-minimum wages), and the oversight of such certificates. By December 2015, this Committee will have met six times and is crafting recommendations.

Speakers
avatar for Ruby K Moore

Ruby K Moore

Executive Director, Georgia Advocacy Office
Ruby Moore is the Executive Director of the Georgia Advocacy Office, the designated Protection and Advocacy System for People with Disabilities in Georgia. Moore is nationally known for her work in the disability field over the past 35 years, particularly in the areas of employment, augmentative communication, and the design and implementation of supports necessary for people with significant disabilities to live, work, play, and go to school... Read More →


Thursday December 3, 2015 10:20am - 11:10am
Salon C 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

10:20am

Community Living Committee Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

More Information Coming Soon
Please Come Back!


Speakers
avatar for Gail Fanjoy

Gail Fanjoy

Executive Director, KFI
2016 TASH Award Winner (Barbara R. Trader Leadership Award)Gail Fanjoy is CEO of KFI (Katahdin Friends, Inc.), an agency which provides supports for people with disabilities in the areas of community employment, supported living, and community life engagement in Maine.  Having worked for KFI since 1976 (40 years!), she has been a leader in the revolutionary shift in service delivery away from sheltered and segregated services to customized... Read More →
avatar for Barb Trader

Barb Trader

Executive Director, TASH
Barb Trader is Executive Director of TASH, a progressive advocacy organization that advances inclusion and human rights of people with significant disabilities and complex needs. In her role at TASH, Barb leads APRAIS (Alliance for Prevention of Restraint, Aversive Intervention and Seclusion), a 32-member alliance of national non-profits with a mission to eliminate aversive interventions. She serves on the Board and is treasurer of the... Read More →


Thursday December 3, 2015 10:20am - 11:10am
Suite 1619

10:20am

Early Career Researcher Network Working Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

In recognizing the unique challenges facing pre-tenure researchers, we are forming an Early Career Researcher Network focused on discovery of research collaboration and mentorship relationships. Join us to contribute to the charter, if you are interested in leadership roles or just want to learn more.

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Ruppar

Andrea Ruppar

Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison
avatar for Donald Taylor

Donald Taylor

Manager, Membership, TASH
I am a member of the TASH staff. Mostly I'm going to be occupied running the conference. When I get to attend conference sessions, it will primarily be pertaining to my staff work on membership and chapters. Otherwise I will be staffing the TASH table. If you need help with anything, just ask and I will do what I can. If you want to know about membership or chapters, come by the table (next to registration) and ask.


Thursday December 3, 2015 10:20am - 11:10am
Salmon 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

10:20am

Beyond the Basics: Access to Mathematics Problem-Solving for Students with Severe Disability
Limited Capacity seats available

The literature on teaching basic mathematics skills related to time, money, and early numeracy skills is extensive in comparison to interventions teaching grade aligned mathematics. Problem solving skills promote independence in current and future environments for individuals with disabilities. The results of an updated review of literature on mathematics will demonstrate the need for increased expectations and opportunities. Two studies will follow that demonstrate the effectiveness of teaching problem solving to students with severe disabilities using schema-based instruction and technology platforms. Implications of access to the general curriculum in mathematics will be discussed. At the end of this panel participants will be able to: (a) compare published mathematics literature in the field of severe disabilities in the past ten years in to the trends of the prior thirty years,
(b) justify mathematical problem solving instruction for students with moderate and severe disabilities, and (c) summarize modifications made to schema based instruction for learners with moderate and severe intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder to teach mathematical word problem solving. An updated review of studies published through 2015 extending the work of Browder et al. (2008) on mathematics interventions for individuals with severe disabilities will be presented. The results indicate there continues to be a need to teach problem solving in mathematics, moving beyond basic concepts and skills. Individuals with severe disabilities who receive full access to and instruction in the general curriculum have improved post-secondary outcomes. There has been an emphasis on the area of literacy in the field of special education, which has led to improvements in practice in classrooms, leading to increased literacy skills for individuals with severe disabilities. However, mathematics is an area that has not seen the same call to action by researchers or educators, yet the impact on the daily lives of individuals with severe disabilities is just as great. Mathematics problem solving skills are used every day by people of all ages – seeing patterns can assist with finding and putting things away on shelves, organizing homes, and playing video games. More obvious problem solving skills are used by adults when they are able to address a problem by recognizing what they know and need to know, such as when mailing 20 holiday greeting cards and knowing that they need 20 stamps. If they only have three stamps, they would need to use problem solving skills to figure out how to get from three to 20 stamps. When at the post office, they may have a choice between a pack of 10 and 25 and will need to choose which pack will have enough. The research base for teaching these algebraic problem solving skills to individuals with severe disabilities is emerging. This presentation will promote practitioner understanding of a mathematical problem solving strategy that incorporates schema-based instruction with evidence-based practices for teaching mathematics to individuals with moderate/severe disabilities. The purpose is to teach recognition underlying problem structures in word problems prior to solving them for better generalizability to real-word situations.

Speakers
avatar for Jenny Root

Jenny Root

University of North Carolina Charlottev
Jenny Root is the Snyder Fellow and a doctoral candidate in special education at the University of North Carolina Charlotte. Her research uses applied behavior analysis to evaluate the effects of technology-aided instruction and learning strategies to provide general curriculum access to students with autism and other developmental disabilities. Jenny is a former school-wide PBIS facilitator and classroom teacher of students with autism and... Read More →
avatar for Fred Spooner

Fred Spooner

Professor, UNC Charlotte
Fred Spooner (Ph.D., University of Florida) is a Professor in the Department of Special Education, and Child Development and Principal Investigator on a Personnel Preparation Project involving distance delivery technologies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and Co-Principal Investigator on a U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences (IES), Project to teach students with moderate/severe intellectual disability... Read More →


Thursday December 3, 2015 10:20am - 11:10am
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

11:20am

Opening General Session
Welcome Remarks
Barb Trader, Executive Director
TASH

2015 TASH Awards Ceremony
Barb Trader, Executive Director
TASH

Sue Swenson
Deputy Assistant Secretary
Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services

What Matters Most: Toward a Future of Flourishing

Erik Carter, Professor in the Department of Special Education
Vanderbilt University

At their core, the most compelling services and supports are driven by a deep commitment to enabling individuals with significant disabilities and their families to flourish. For more than four decades, TASH and its members have been at the forefront of calling the field to support people to thrive in the ways that matter most. Standing on the cusp of 40 years of IDEA and 25 years of federally mandated transition services, we have much progress to celebrate. But there is much more work still yet to do.

Erik Carter’s keynote will focus on how our field might move forward faster toward a future marked by flourishing—both for our organization and for the individuals we serve. He will highlight promising pathways that enable young people with significant disabilities to live lives marked by rich relationships and real opportunities. And he will challenge us to consider how we might create communities that see themselves as incomplete without the gifts and contributions of people with disabilities and their families. 

Farewell Remarks
Barb Trader, Executive Director
TASH 

The Legacy of Judith Snow
Facilitated by dear friends of Judith Snow

On May 31, 2015, the world suddenly lost Judith Snow - a philosopher, a scientist, a researcher, an engineer, a guru, an artist, and an advocate. This keynote tribute will include video clips of some of Judith’s most powerful lessons. Judith’s closest friends and colleagues will contribute to this celebration of her life and legacy by reading selections of her writings and discussing her fearless pursuit of full citizenship.  Images will honor Judith and her accomplishments, and challenge attendees to answer the question, “How am I connected to Judith Snow”.

Conclusion of Opening General Session
 

Speakers
avatar for Erik Carter

Erik Carter

Vanderbilt University, Professor in the Department of Special Education
Erik Carter, PhD, is a Professor in the Department of Special Education at Vanderbilt University and a member of the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center. His research and teaching focuses on evidence-based strategies for supporting inclusion and valued roles in school, work, and community settings for children and adults with severe disabilities. He has published more than 150 articles, chapters, and books in the areas of educational and transition... Read More →
avatar for Sue Swenson

Sue Swenson

Deputy Assistant Secretary, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services
avatar for Barb Trader

Barb Trader

Executive Director, TASH
Barb Trader is Executive Director of TASH, a progressive advocacy organization that advances inclusion and human rights of people with significant disabilities and complex needs. In her role at TASH, Barb leads APRAIS (Alliance for Prevention of Restraint, Aversive Intervention and Seclusion), a 32-member alliance of national non-profits with a mission to eliminate aversive interventions. She serves on the Board and is treasurer of the... Read More →



Thursday December 3, 2015 11:20am - 12:50pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

1:20pm

Behavior and the IEP
Limited Capacity seats available

As Oregon's PTI, Parent Training and Information Center, we support families statewide in supporting their child getting an equitable education, and accessing general education even when impacted by significant bahaviors. Join us for a discussion about: How behavior can impact learning How behavior can be supported in the IEP What rights students have when disciplined for behavior violations OBJECTIVES: Join us for a discussion about: How behavior can impact learning How behavior can be supported in the IEP What rights students have when disciplined for behavior violations Also some learning targets are: What is behavior Special Factors on the IEP Common Terms Functional Behavior Assessments Behavior Plans Addressing behavior Discipline Tips and Tools for the Team Being able to advocate for my child and being able to understand what their rights are to an equitable education, even when impacted by significant behaviors. Also, understanding that behaviors are a form of communication. Making sure the IEP team is not being punitive and reactive, but supporting the student in a proactive and positive way!


Thursday December 3, 2015 1:20pm - 2:10pm
Mt Hood 1414 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

1:20pm

Culturally Competent Advocacy for Limited English Proficient Students with Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will summarize the laws, regulations and federal court cases that support the family's education rights of limited English proficient (LEP) individuals requiring special education services. Participants will acquire the tools necessary to advocate effectively for the rights of limited English proficiency (LEP) families, or to advocate effectively for their own rights. Additionally, participants will learn how to set up or run more effective culturally competent special education advocacy projects in their community.

Thursday December 3, 2015 1:20pm - 2:10pm
Salon C 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

1:20pm

Developing Student Portfolios in Early Childhood Settings Using iBooks Author
Limited Capacity seats available

Portfolios are meaningful collections of student work that provide educators and family members with a means to collect, store, evaluate, and present student progress and achievements. Traditionally portfolio contents have been comprised of materials stored within physical folders or binders. Overtime these collections may grow to encompass boxes, shelves, or entire file cabinets. This presentation will introduce how iBooks Author could be used by educators and family members to create and manage electronic student portfolios. Audience members will be able to interact with examples and have access to templates that they can use to begin creating their own student portfolios. After this session participants:
1. Will be able to describe what student portfolios are.
2. Will be able to describe how student portfolios can be utilized in the assessment and evaluation of young children with disabilities.
3. Will be able to describe what iBooks Author is.
4. Will be given the opportunity to interact with examples of iBooks Author portfolios.
5. Will be presented with iBooks Author templates that they can use to begin creating their own student portfolios and be able to describe how those portfolios can be shared across traditional (desktop and laptop), tablet, and mobile computing devices.

Speakers
CO

Conrad Oh-Young

Doctoral Student, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Doctoral Student in the UNLV College of Education Department of Educational & Clinical Studies.


Thursday December 3, 2015 1:20pm - 2:10pm
Meadowlark 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

1:20pm

HCBS Person Centered Planning Requirements: How will States meet this Mandate?
Limited Capacity full

States face an unprecedented challenge in offering the support needed for every HCBS participant to have a person centered plan to guide their services.With over 688,000 people needing plans extensive planning and solid strategies must be available to support such a massive effort.
This presentation will outline the critical elements to be addressed in State strategies. Included will be discussions of several different means to support people with I/DD and their families to develop individual person centered plans. Additionally this presentation will address another crucial component: the knowledge of the resources available from local communities and the state’s DD system. Participants will learn about the options available now to support more people with I/DD tp access high quality person centered plans.
Participants will understand better the logistics of offering person centered plans for such large numbers of people.
Participants will learn to balance the need for large numbers of person centered plans with the need to maintain the highest quality in the plans produced.



Thursday December 3, 2015 1:20pm - 2:10pm
Columbia 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

1:20pm

Teaching Emotional Regulation. Essential Skills for Classroom Inclusion
Limited Capacity filling up

The growing rate of students with significant Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities in schools is well documented. There is a crisis in schools to manage behaviors that challenge even the most seasoned educator. Traditional behavioral interventions, while useful, are not providing the needed support and the inclusion of students with EBD is in decline. Schools need alternative methods and practices. Exciting new research in Emotional Regulation is paving the way for new methods and new practices. Special Education supports in inclusive classrooms are poised for a disruption. The time for change is now. OBJECTIVES: 1. Gain a comprehensive understanding of the new research on Emotional Regulation as it relates to children with Emotional and Behavioral Difficulties. 2. Discuss and learn how Emotional Dysregulation impacts students as negative behaviors often require removal from a regular classroom. 3. Discuss and Review the current programs and strategies in place to manage the behaviors that result from diminished Emotional Regulation abilities. 4. Discuss and Learn a new and proven method to teach strategies to manage Emotional Regulation in classrooms using technology based on Cognitive Behavioral Theory. 5. Create and Identify specific methods to use in classrooms to manage students in order to keep them learning in regular classrooms.

Speakers

Thursday December 3, 2015 1:20pm - 2:10pm
Pearl 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

1:20pm

Trauma Informed PBIS: Implications for the Development of Individualized Transition Planning
Limited Capacity seats available

Trauma Informed Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is rapidly changing the way that schools address the social, behavioral, and academic needs of children and adolescents with disabilities. This presentation will describe how the concept of trauma informed PBIS can be merged with the transition components of the IEP (age-appropriate transition assessment, post-secondary goals, transition services) for adolescents with significant disabilities. OBJECTIVES1. Apply trauma informed PBIS principles to the design of age-appropriate individualized transition assessment; 2. Develop trauma informed post-secondary goals that recognize the need for socially and emotionally supportive employment and residential environments; and 3. Identify transition services that address each individual's risk factors for safety, support, and stability. IMPORTANCE: The principles of trauma informed PBIS have been applied to the assessment of risk factors and the application of promising interventions in schools and classrooms. This presentation will provide a clear understanding of how these principles can be directly applied to the transition components of the IEP. TRANSLATING TOPIC INTO POSITIVE OUTCOMES: The presentation will address the application of trauma informed principles and practices into three transition components of the IEPs for students with severe disabilities in secondary schools: (1) age appropriate transition assessment; (2) post-secondary goals; and (3) transition services. In terms of individualized age-appropriate transition assessment, the introduction of trauma-related risk factors and adverse childhood experiences will significantly change the framework of transition assessment. When assessing a student?s immediate and post-school goals, desires, and preferences, an awareness of a student?s adverse childhood experiences, stability of current living arrangements, and presence of physical and mental threats in the student?s home or community will identify the need for urgent services as well as explain a student?s behaviors or emotions within the assessment setting. When post-secondary goals for an individual student, the application of trauma informed principles will change the way school and community personnel look at potential educational, employment, or residential environments. This approach will focus on enabling the student to choose, access, and benefit from safe, stable environments with the supports necessary to address identified risk factors such as unsafe communities, threatening living arrangements, and specialized employment supports. When designing transition support services, the transition team can identify immediate student needs for services such as substance abuse services, positive behavioral interventions, safe afterschool environments, stable residential settings, appropriate counseling services, etc. The need for these critical services will change the types of community agencies who attend the IEP, the transition supports built into the IEPs, and the measurement tools used to assess the effectiveness of the services, instruction, and support.


Thursday December 3, 2015 1:20pm - 2:10pm
Salon H 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

1:20pm

Turning Dreams to Action: Advocacy for Postsecondary Education Options in Oregon& Beyond
Limited Capacity seats available

While options to attend college are growing slowly around the country, there is still much work to be done to assure that students in every state have options available to them that are inclusive, authentic and result in high quality post-school outcomes such as integrated competitive employment. This session will share advocacy efforts that are currently underway in Oregon, as well as outline key strategies for establishing new college opportunities, including grassroots advocacy, political strategies and evidenced-based practices. The session will also include an overview of the current status of postsecondary education for students with intellectual disabilities nationwide. . OBJECTIVES:Participants will learn about the current national picture for college options for students with intellectual disability. Participants will learn strategies that student are using to advocate for postsecondary education opportunities in their state. Participants will learn how to establish and operate a statewide coalition to support the growth of postsecondary education options. Participants will learn a minimum of 10 key action steps involved in getting an inclusive postsecondary education option established. Participants will learn 5 actions to avoid to ensure that PSE options that are established are inclusive and offer an authentic college experience.

Speakers
avatar for Cate Weir

Cate Weir

Project Coordinator, Think College
inclusive postsecondary education for students with intellectual disabilities



Thursday December 3, 2015 1:20pm - 2:10pm
Medford 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

1:20pm

Voices of Exclusion: Nonspeaking Youth Advocate for Inclusive Education
Limited Capacity filling up

Despite demonstration of comprehension and ability to communicate through alternative means, nonspeaking students with significant motor impairments have been denied a meaningful education. A diverse panel of young adults with autism will present their experience of exclusion from general education. They will discuss their desire for age appropriate, general education and dispel current thinking about nonspeaking people with autism. Moderated by Elizabeth Vosseller, CCC-SLP, the panel will highlight the difference between speech and language and offer strategies for inclusion in general education settings. Our panel is grateful for 40 years of progressive leadership; they represent the next 40 years.

OBJECTIVES: 1. Distinguish the difference between speech (motor) and language (cognitive) 2. Describe one or more strategies for the successful inclusion of nonspeaking students in general education settings 3. Discuss the ability of students with significant motor impairments to actively participate in a live, interactive panel discussion, thus any general education setting 4. List the benefits of including nonspeaking students in general education settings.

Speakers
avatar for Niko  Boskovic

Niko Boskovic

Niko is an autistic young man who relies on a letterboard for communication. He attended a RPM [rapid prompting method] training with Elizabeth Vosseller, M.A., CCC-SLP of Growing Kids Therapy, in October 2014, where he quickly took to this low-tech assistive technology. | | Homeschooled since first grade, Niko entered ninth grade fully included at a local charter school this fall, and has thrived academically. He is the first student in... Read More →
avatar for Liam  Paquin

Liam Paquin

Self advocate, Liam Paquin, will be part of a diverse panel of young adults presenting Voices of Exclusion: Nonspeaking Youth Advocate for Inclusion Education. | He will discuss his experience of exclusion from general education. Liam will discuss his desire for age appropriate, general education and dispel current thinking about nonspeaking people with autism.   | | See Liam's video HERE
avatar for Elizabeth L. Vosseller, M.A., CCC-SLP

Elizabeth L. Vosseller, M.A., CCC-SLP

Director, SLP, Growing Kids Therapy Center
Elizabeth Vosseller has been a practicing Speech-Language Pathologist since 1995. She earned her Bachelors and Masters degrees in Speech and Hearing Sciences from the University of Maryland. Elizabeth has focused her career in both academia and therapeutic practice. As a Professor and Clinical Supervisor at The George Washington University she taught courses at the undergraduate and graduate level in the Speech-Language and Education... Read More →
avatar for Huan Voung

Huan Voung

Huan Vuong is 18 years old, a student at Wakefield High School in Arlington, VA. After years of silence, Huan now has found his true voice with Rapid Prompting Method (RPM). He is a leader in the Autism community and an advocate for those who still do not have a voice.


liam jpg
niko png
Emma png
Ben png
Huan png
ASNV jpg

Thursday December 3, 2015 1:20pm - 2:10pm
Douglas 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

1:20pm

What promotes independent living?
Limited Capacity filling up

This study will identify ways schools and families can support youth?s transition to adulthood in terms of independent living. We will look at outcomes of youth from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds and levels of disability. We will develop a model for understanding the role of different factors and their effect on people with disabilities? ability to live independently by using nationally representative data from the NLTS2. OBJECTIVES: After this session, participants will: a) know which factors impact postsecondary living b) know how youth fair off in terms of postsecondary living when background (cultural and linguistic) factors are taken into consideration c) know how youth fair off in terms of postsecondary living when the severity of disability is taken into consideration d) know how to best support youth to achieve positive postsecondary living outcomes IMPORTANCE: Independent living is one of the most significant markers for successful transition to adulthood for students with disabilities (Wehmeyer & Palmer, 2003), and is considered to a primary goal of special education (Newman et al., 2011). It is also the best measure to assess community participation of people with disabilities. TRANSLATING TOPIC INTO NEW OUTCOMES:This study aims to identify the ways schools and families can support students during high school to achieve better independent living outcomes during their adulthood. Specifically, we will develop a model for understanding the role of different factors and their effect on people with disabilities? ability to live independently by using nationally representative data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2 (NLTS2). The model will investigate the impact of various factors (parents? and students? expectations for postsecondary lives, training in independent living, participation in leadership and community activities, having a paid job, time spent in general education, and how much youth felt they relied on others) on the living status after finishing high school, while controlling for gender, age, and disability. These variables have been previously linked to successful transition outcomes in terms of employment and postsecondary education, and there is evidence indicating that some might be moderately linked to successful transition to independent living (Test et al., 2009). Results will be used to make recommendations for training teachers and families to best support students in achieving better independent living outcomes. Because this is a large, nationally representative sample, our results are also conducive to making policy and best practices recommendations.

Speakers
avatar for Irina Cain

Irina Cain

Doctoral Candidate, Virginia Commonwealth University


Thursday December 3, 2015 1:20pm - 2:10pm
Eugene 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

1:20pm

My Personal Journey into College
Limited Capacity seats available

Informing Families, a project of the Washington State Developmental Disabilities Council, is producing a mini documentary about Dylan's pursuit of a college education, a lifelong dream for Dylan and one of the final civil rights hurdles for individuals with developmental disabilities who continue to fight for full inclusion in all areas of life.

I will talk about the long process to be admitted into The Evergreen State College located in Olympia, Washington. It started when I was 19 and I am now 32 years old. With the help of my community college, private tutors and three years with a non-profit organization called KOKUA , who provided me and others students personal tutors from Evergreen, and the direct support from an Evergreen faculty, I was able to be admitted as a part time student. Slow and steady, I will prove I am capable of becoming a full-time student. Patience and resilience. That's me!


OBJECTIVES: As a result of this session my presentation will provide others living life with a disability an example of what is possible when you build a team around you that says YES to your dreams. In addition, I hope professionals, providers and family members will raise the bar of potential and possibilities for others living life with a disability. Sometimes it takes a pioneer like myself to go first before others dare to follow. I want to inspire others and give them some examples of what worked on my journey to college. If my presentation inspires even one new person with a disability to consider post-secondary education as an option, I have achieved my goal. Another result of my session is to get others inspired by my tenacious way of living life. I never give up on my dreams. Never say Never! Keep trying and reach for your dreams. When told no, hear this as a motivator to try a different way to get what you want. Another learning objective is to encourage others to believe in the possibility of INCLUSION and be inspired to find ways to be included in their communities.

My personal YES team includes an accomplished filmographer who has documented my college journey. It is with great pride that I will be showing this documentary film. Those attending my session will not only hear my words but begin to feel the journey. It shows the ups and downs, happy and sad. I was brought to tears and laughter and felt enormous excitement when I was finally admitted. Showing the film is another way I have embraced being an example for others. Changing people's attitudes and expectations about people living life with a disability is a hard, yet important responsibility. Don't let the struggle define the outcome.


Thursday December 3, 2015 1:20pm - 2:10pm
Salon D 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

1:20pm

Cal-TASH Chapter Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

All conference participants from California are invited to come and hear about current issues, events, and advocacy opportunities in our state. Join us!

Speakers
AH

Amy Hanreddy

Assistant Professor, Cal State Northridge
avatar for Kirk Hinkleman

Kirk Hinkleman

Associate Director/Co-Founder, Life Works/Kinship Project
Talk to me about human connection...
avatar for Natalie Holdren

Natalie Holdren

TEP Faculty & Doctoral Student, UC Santa Barbara
Inclusive Education, Cultural & Linguistic Competence, Evidence-Based Practices, Literacy Instruction


Thursday December 3, 2015 1:20pm - 2:10pm
Sunstone 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

1:20pm

Development Committee Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

More information coming soon

Moderators
avatar for Dawn Brown

Dawn Brown

Development Director, TASH
Dawn Brown serves as the Director of Development for TASH. Dawn is responsible for all aspects of fund development for TASH, including securing support of the conference through sponsors, writing grants, promoting annual giving among the membership and building community relationships. Dawn has over 20 years’ experience in education, fund development and business development, and much of her career has been entrepreneurial, including... Read More →

Thursday December 3, 2015 1:20pm - 2:10pm
Salmon 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

1:20pm

Inclusive Education Committee Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

More Information Coming Soon
Please Come Back!


Moderators
avatar for Jennifer A. Kurth

Jennifer A. Kurth

Asst. Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education
avatar for Mary E. Morningstar

Mary E. Morningstar

Dr. Mary E. Morningstar is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Kansas and Director of the Transition Coalition, which offers online, hybrid and in-person professional development and resources for secondary special educators and transition practitioners. Dr. Morningstar also is the Program Director for the Low Incidence teacher education program which trains teachers of students with significant... Read More →
avatar for Jenny  Stonemeier

Jenny Stonemeier

Director of Education Policy, TASH
ask me about: | TASH | TASH Conference | Membership | EducationEquity | Inclusive Education | Education Policy | gluten free cooking

Thursday December 3, 2015 1:20pm - 2:10pm
Salem 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

1:20pm

Research and Publication Committee Annual Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

The Committee will meet to formulate plans for promoting research and initiating new publications for the coming year.

Speakers
avatar for Bethany Alvare

Bethany Alvare

Communications Manager, TASH
Bethany Alvaré is advocacy communications manager at TASH, a national disability advocacy organization. Alvaré manages all internal and external communications at TASH, developing advocacy campaigns, promoting conferences, and driving membership. She maintains relationships with many vendors, including media, publishing companies, and partnering organizations. Other responsibilities include graphic design, website maintenance, and content... Read More →


Thursday December 3, 2015 1:20pm - 2:10pm
Portland 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

1:20pm

The Sunset Sky
Limited Capacity seats available

ON A JOURNEY TO FIND HERSELF, THEY FOUND EACH OTHER

From award winning, writer-director Olivier Bernier comes The Sunset Sky, a bitter sweet coming of age story about two siblings on a search for the truth behind their past.


Jennifer, is left as the sole caretaker of her autistic brother, Charlie. After being evicted from their home, Unequipped to deal with the burden of her autistic brother, she decides to drive Charlie across the United States to their father’s whom he has never met.

During their four days on long dusty roads, they are thrust into a life of, laughter, insecurity, violence, crime and self-discovery. As their journey takes a turn for the worse, she discovers that she needs her brother just as much as he needs her. 





 

Speakers

Thursday December 3, 2015 1:20pm - 3:10pm
Salon A 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

1:20pm

Research Symposium on Education Systems & Leadership
Limited Capacity seats available

Inclusive Education Systems & Leadership Symposium
Research and Teams:
• Investigating Alignment between CCSS and Curricula for Students with Extensive Learning Needs- Debbie Taub, Jessica McCord, Andrea Ruppar, Megan Foster, Amanda Helman
• Administrators and Counselors Perceptions of Preparedness in Supporting Students with Severe Disabilities- Karen McCaleb, Phyllis Robertson

Speakers
JM

Jessica McCord

Educational Consultant, ACERI Partners
avatar for Andrea Ruppar

Andrea Ruppar

Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison


Thursday December 3, 2015 1:20pm - 3:10pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

1:20pm

TASH Transition Roundtable: Expanding Secondary Inclusion and Improving Postschool Outcomes
Limited Capacity seats available

The TASH Transition Roundtable is a special event that will comprise of a 2-hour Roundtable Discussion that is open to audience participation, and a 1-hour Working discussion among invited participants to draft a working document. The purpose of this Roundtable is to respond to 3 broad questions:

1. What is TASH’s position on the configuration and makeup of transition services both during high school, 18-21 transition programs, and adult services?
2. What is TASH’s unique contribution to the issues associated with transition to adulthood for youth with significant disabilities?
3. What can we do (individually and collectively) to facilitate changes in transition practices and programs, supporting families, professionals and systems to start “where they are”?

The format for the Roundtable will be to include a panel of 3 experts, who will each frame 3-5 critical issues from the reference point of inclusive education, effective transition programs, and integrated employment outcomes. The panelists will briefly present, and then engage with audience to further discuss the relevant issues to answer the overarching questions.

This is a critical topic given the legal, legislative, research evidence, and societal changes in expectations for quality of life outcomes for young adults with significant disabilities. It is well documented that youth with significant disabilities experience the poorest employment outcomes (Sanford et al., 2011). The prevalence of segregated employment programs combined with low expectations is also a result of limited access to transition services that prepare students for integrated employment. Understanding critical contextual factors influencing barriers and facilitators is needed to promote systemic change.

The importance of providing youth with severe disabilities with effective and evidence-based career development and work experiences prior to exiting transition services is a well-established, widely held, and professionally accepted. There is proof of predictive relationships between the types of employment preparation and transition services students with disabilities receive while in school and their long-term employment outcomes. Students must be provided effective preparation to make informed, meaningful choices for competitive, integrated work.

Recent research and models of inclusive education support the importance of secondary students with significant disabilities learning essential “soft skills” for employment (e.g., communication skills, problem-solving, teamwork, etc.) which are best taught and practiced in inclusive settings. For many researchers and practitioners engaged in secondary inclusive education, the historical approach of segregating students from general education context in order to teach “functional skills” has shown little evidence of improved postschool outcomes.

This Transition Roundtable will specifically examine the current understand and research that aligns inclusive secondary educational experiences (middle school and high school) with post-high school transition programs and postsecondary education enrollment with the strong evidence associated with school and work-based learning that promotes expectations and experiences leading to integrated employment outcomes. An essential outcome is to reach consensus on the intersection between inclusive education and access to an array of school and work-based learning needed to achieve a positive and inclusive adult working life.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Callahan

Michael Callahan

President, Marc Gold & Associates
Customized Employment, Discovery, Job Development, Systematic Instruction, consulting, certification, inclusive community planning
avatar for Erik Carter

Erik Carter

Vanderbilt University, Professor in the Department of Special Education
Erik Carter, PhD, is a Professor in the Department of Special Education at Vanderbilt University and a member of the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center. His research and teaching focuses on evidence-based strategies for supporting inclusion and valued roles in school, work, and community settings for children and adults with severe disabilities. He has published more than 150 articles, chapters, and books in the areas of educational and transition... Read More →
avatar for Mary E. Morningstar

Mary E. Morningstar

Dr. Mary E. Morningstar is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Kansas and Director of the Transition Coalition, which offers online, hybrid and in-person professional development and resources for secondary special educators and transition practitioners. Dr. Morningstar also is the Program Director for the Low Incidence teacher education program which trains teachers of students with significant... Read More →


Thursday December 3, 2015 1:20pm - 3:10pm
Salon I 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

2:20pm

(Re)examining research methods: Intersecting arts based method and disability studies
Limited Capacity seats available

Arts based methods and emancipatory disability research share a similar embodiment of inclusive/holistic alternative research approaches that challenge the hegemonic positivist research practices. By using an autoethnographic methodology, I engage in a critical self-reflexive process about my experiences as a doctoral student and researcher with significant hearing loss. The intent of this presentation is to reexamine research methods from an arts-based and emancipatory disability research lens. In other words, what alternative insights can we learn about research/er by intersecting arts based and disability research? The significance of this study illustrates a need to reexamine the notion of research/er in order to challenge the norms of research methods along with the norms of knowing.

Speakers

Thursday December 3, 2015 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Salon C 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

2:20pm

A Multicomponent Autism Awareness Training for Typical Peers
Limited Capacity seats available

The current study challenges the widespread belief that sharing child-specific information with typical peers leads to stigmatization. A multi-component peer awareness training succeeded in positively changing both typical peer attitudes and behaviors toward a peer with autism. OBJECTIVES: +T2 IMPORTANCE: There is very little research looking into whether sharing disability-specific information about a child will render positive results, as many fear that it will lead to increased stigmatization. Providing our youth with education about autism can allow them to be open minded and accepting. TRANSLATING TOPIC INTO IMPROVED OUTCOMES:In the literature on social inclusion of children with ASD, researchers have expressed concern about sharing child-specific information about children with autism to their typically developing peers (Campbell, 2006). Based on the current influx in ASD diagnoses, as well as the increase in mainstreamed/included children with an ASD diagnosis in schools, there is a need for increased awareness and understanding of autism by peers and educators. In my work as a one-on-one behavioral therapist with children with autism, I have seen improvements in children with autism?s conversational skills, initiations and responsivity rates and willingness to engage in a more expansive repertoire of activities. What I have not seen, however, is an increased understanding of why these children act the way they do on the typical peers' parts; particularly with those on the lower end of the spectrum whose stimulatory behaviors, inflexibilities and communication difficulties may never completely dissipate. This lack of understanding may hinder the rate of improvement in the previously mentioned areas on the child with autism?s part, as their typical peers are hesitant to interact with them. By focusing as much energy on peers' behaviors, a relationship of understanding and acceptance can emerge, allowing peers to be more patient and willing to interact with and help children with autism, thereby leading to more rapid gains in skillets in chidden with autism, as they are being reinforced by positive interatcions and relationships with others.

Speakers

Thursday December 3, 2015 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Salon D 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

2:20pm

Equine Assisted Psychotherapy and Personal Development For Individuals With Developmental Disabilities
Limited Capacity seats available

Founder and Director of NorthStar Services, Claudia Bolton understood that many of the individuals they support have experienced emotional and psychological trauma. Appreciating the need for and limitations of talk therapy with individuals with developmental disabilities, she sought an alternative collaboration with Windows To My Soul, an organization offering Equine Assisted Psychotherapy. With an understanding that trauma is healed through successful relationships with self and others and with horses as relationship partners, individuals learn relationship skills that are transferable to their human counterparts. Hear the stories of several individuals and their journey with Equine Assisted Therapy. OBJECTIVES: Describe why and what makes horses a perfect partner for learning relationship skills. Describe some of the ways in which horses mirror/react to the participating individual?s unconscious/subconscious fears and emotions. Describe how the experience in the arena builds self-confidence in participating individuals. Describe how equine assisted therapy techniques can help participating individuals establish safe boundaries between themselves and others. Describe how participating individuals learn to identify horses? unique way of communicating and how this raises their awareness of non-verbal communication in others.


Thursday December 3, 2015 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Pearl 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

2:20pm

Extracurricular School Clubs and Students with Severe Disabilities: Perceptions, Participation, & Purpose
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will review preliminary findings from a multiple case study that investigated what purpose was served for secondary students with severe disabilities that participated in extracurricular school clubs and how students participated in school club activities. There is limited empirical evidence for understanding teacher, school club sponsor, and family motives for including students with severe disabilities in extracurricular activities. This study sought to expand on this area by investigating the purpose for participation in school club activities for students with severe disabilities and exploring factors that facilitated/hindered their participation. Implications from findings will seek to aid practitioners in planning, facilitating, and supporting inclusive extracurricular engagement for students with severe disabilities. OBJECTIVES: 1. Summarize the need/purpose for including students with severe disabilities in extracurricular activities and school clubs; 2. Discuss factors that facilitate and hinder the participation of students with severe disabilities in extracurricular school clubs; and 3. Identify strategies for increasing and supporting students’ engagement in extracurricular school clubs.

Speakers
SK

Stacy K Dymond

Professor | Department of Special Education | University of Illinois


Thursday December 3, 2015 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Douglas 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

2:20pm

Leading school transformation: Empowering ALL to build school communities for ALL
Limited Capacity seats available

This session presents how SWIFT partner school and district leaders value and empower people in their communities to contribute to decisions affecting their own lives and student outcomes; distribute leadership throughout the system; and collaboratively work to understand influences on inclusive practices, and find solutions to address barriers. Vignettes from schools in New Hampshire and Maryland illustrate these leadership principles and practices. Student placement data, school practices, and change over time will be shared. Participants will interact with each other and the presenters to identify ways in which their schools can incorporate SWIFT leadership strategies to include ALL students. OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe the SWIFT Framework for inclusive education 2. Articulate and practice the principles of distributed leadership in transforming schools 3. Identify habits to empower school teams and teachers to lead inclusive reforms that desegregate schools, ensuring full inclusion of all students 4. Identify practices to incorporate family and community members onto a building leadership team 5. Describe the ways in which family and community members contribute to a positive and inclusive school culture for all students

Speakers
avatar for Maura Hart

Maura Hart

NH LEA Facilitator, SWIFT
Educational Systems Change, | Fully Inclusive Schools, | Collaborative, Problem-based Learning | Instructional Coaching
avatar for Carol Quirk

Carol Quirk

Executive Director, Maryland Coalition for Inclusive Education


Thursday December 3, 2015 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Salon G 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

2:20pm

My Son can work: A Parent's Strategies for Supporting Youth with Autism
Limited Capacity seats available

This case study research explored a parent's experience supporting her son with low functioning autism's achievement of a career goal through transition from school to work. The analysis of data focused on emerging major themes to construct effective strategies to support the youth with autism for reaching a career goal within integrated employment. OBJECTIVES: The experience of transition from high school to work is difficult for students with disabilities, especially autism. The majority of youths with autism are more likely to experience working within segregated environments or simply be unemployed. The purpose of this case study was to understand a parent's experiences preparing and supporting a youth with autism from a school setting to work in a local business. At this stage in the research, support would generally be defined as useful strategies for developing employment skills on the part of a parent's contributions to her youth with autism. IMPORTANCE: The parent's role has a significant impact on their child's development. Hence, the parents who have high stress levels and low expectations for their child's future life can negatively affect the students' abilities to succeed in job performance and independent skills (Newsome, 2000). TRANSLATING TOPIC INTO POSITIVE OUTCOMES: Recently, having a child with autism is raising the rates of parental concerns with stress, depression, and other emotions surrounding the disorder. Parents are more likely to carry lower expectations towards their child's success (Anan, Warner, McGillivary, Chong & Hines, 2008). Lecavalier, and Wiltz (2006) found that a group of parents of children with autism had higher stress levels than a group of parents of children with other disabilities. The relationship between the child's behavioral challenges and the parents' stress increases the negative outcomes of emotional reactions within families (Herring, Gray, Taffe, Tonge, Sweeney & Einfeld, 2006). FINDINGS: The results of this study revealed the potential benefits to guide various strategies and techniques for support youths with autism. The parent's experiences of supporting her son from high school to integrated employment, her story are delineated by divided into three period times as the follow: 1) always in my dream, 2) seek transition program and vocational opportunity, and 3) gain knowledge in special education. Four major themes also are found, including: setting the goal, beliefs, providing opportunities, keeping discipline, and being consistent. The value of integrated employment is revealed as providing the opportunity for making friendships, being a good citizen, and creating valuable experiences.

Speakers
avatar for Supattra

Supattra

Executive Director, Go For Determination, LLC.
Special Education Advocate, Consultant, Teacher, Professor, Lecturer, and Founder of Go For Determination. Graduated from the University of Northern Colorado with a Ph.D. in Special Education awarded minors in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies and Applied Statistics and Research Methods. Currently Specializing in Transition, and advocating for the rights of people living with ASD and other developmental disabilities. Speaks English and... Read More →


Thursday December 3, 2015 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Salon H 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

2:20pm

Post-Secondary Academic Supports for Students with ID/DD
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will focus on the utilization and implementation of academic supports offered through Wayfinders at the California State University, Fresno to support students with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities. The primary support offered from our program is one-on-one tutorials between the Academic Student Coach and student. Academic Student Coaches provide differing levels of supports, which can vary throughout the semester. Tutorials are utilized to support students track, plan, and complete academic assignments. The levels of support that are planned during tutorials include in-class supports, study halls, and existing resources provided by Fresno State. OBJECTIVES: The overall goal of this presentation is to detail the training and implementation of Academic Student Coaches in a post-secondary inclusion system. We will discuss in detail the supports coaches make available to their student?s as well as the initial and on-going training they receive. An essential component of our coaching philosophy is not to duplicate services that are naturally available in a university setting. As a result we work closely with our university resource centers and this relationship will also be discussed. The primary audiences for this presentation are professionals and advocates working in the field as well as potential students who are interested in obtained post-secondary education. By the end of this presentation our goal is that the audience will be aware of what services are naturally available in a university setting. How these services can support students with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities and areas where additional supports may be necessary.

Speakers
MO

Micaela Ovalle

Academic Coach, Wayfinders at Fresno State


Thursday December 3, 2015 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Meadowlark 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

2:20pm

Real jobs for real pay: Public policy and legal challenges for change
Limited Capacity full

Forty years after the DD Act and the founding of TASH, and twenty five years after the ADA, individuals with significant disabilities are still segregated and denied access to meaningful employment. This, despite public policy that states we should expect integration and inclusion in all aspects of life. The law alone is insufficient to assure equality of opportunity. We must demand that public funds and services support full inclusion and opportunity to become self-sufficient. Learn about strategies that are challenging the status quo and what you can do to gain access to supports and services needed to obtain real employment. OBJECTIVES: 1. State the basis for civil rights protections for people with disabilities related to real jobs. 2. Summarize recent strategies that have increased Employment First practices. 3. Challenge state and local practices resulting in systemic change.

Speakers

Thursday December 3, 2015 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Sunstone 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

2:20pm

Self-Advocates on a Local Level
Limited Capacity full

Self-Advocates Taking Action of Portland Oregon has been meeting monthly for 3 years. Members of the group have a variety of backgrounds. Many of the members are part of state and city policy groups and have been advocating and teaching their community for decades. Each has a unique and interesting story of how they found their voice. The group will most likely present in a panel format and highlight their experience in politics, growing membership as well as employment and healthcare.. OBJECTIVES:1. Identify services available through various formal and informal public and private systems, and how to find them in their local communities. 2. Identify resources and partners who are available to support job seekers with disabilities (e.g., American Job Centers, vocational rehabilitation, community colleges, community job training programs, employers, personal networks, faith communities, community groups, and more). 3. Hear success stories from people with disabilities and their partners who have forged a pathway to employment. 4. Take charge of your employment future and advocate, individually and for collective impact, for opportunities, services, accommodations and supports leading to employment and a more full life.


Thursday December 3, 2015 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Salem 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

2:20pm

Successful Communication ? What do I do? How do I get there?
Limited Capacity seats available

Communication is a most basic civil right and yet, even with TASH’s 40 years of progressive leadership, data indicates that 30% of students still leave school without a symbolic form of communication. Students who use a different, idiosyncratic, way to communicate other than speaking or signing understand much more than they can express. This session will highlight promising practices in developing communicative competence for students with complex communication needs. These practices will include feature matching, aided language modelling, and teaching communication as part of a daily instructional routine. Technical assistance/professional development models will be described to support systemic change. Participants will gain insight into the variety of modes individuals use to communicate their intentions and identify features of communication systems that match an individual’s current modes and intents and allows for growth as individuals become more sophisticated communicators. Video clips will be used to practice understanding of idiosyncratic modes of communication and the possible intents or messages they represent. Participants will be introduced to a variety of evidenced based strategies (i.e., topic boards, aided language stimulation, and peer modeling) to engage individuals in communicative exchanges. . Participants will also learn about the Communication Toolkit of PD modules developed by the University of Kentucky as part of the NCSC GSEG.

Speakers
avatar for Lou-Ann Land

Lou-Ann Land

University of Kentucky


Thursday December 3, 2015 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Medford 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

2:20pm

System Change to Collaborative PBIS Capacity Building in Community Living
Limited Capacity seats available

Representatives from Chilliwack Society for Community Living, CBI Consultants and Community Living BC will describe how behaviour support services are changing in British Columbia. An evidence-based transformation from ?expert? model to front line empowerment has helped to address the challenges of limited financial and human resources, increasing demand, and poor response times. A collaborative multi-disciplinary partnership has resulted in the development and delivery of a PBIS training curriculum to front line staff, professional mentoring opportunities for agencies and funding improvements. Case examples and materials will be shared to assist other jurisdictions to adopt a similar approach. . OBJECTIVES:Participants will: ? Learn the steps to move from expert model of PBIS to staff wide model. ? Learn how to incorporate Life Style Development planning into PBIS to improve quality of life for the individuals being supported. ? Learn the steps to overcome barriers that arise with the transition to an agency wide PBIS approach. ? Learn creative ways to fund the training of all the staff within the agency. ? Learn how to use limited consultant (PBIS trainer) resources to ensure that they are both effective and efficient. With little effort BIG change can occur for the individuals being served, the staff, the agency and the community. ? Learn how to empower staff with a skill set that provides them the ability to directly improve the lives of those they support.

Speakers
CT

Carla Thiesen

Quality Service Analyst, Community Living BC
I have being working in the community living field for more than 25 years and have held a range of positions from front line to executive positions throughout my career. I am currently employed by Community Living BC, a Crown Corporation in the Province of British Columbia, serving adults who have a developmental disability or who qualify through a unique stream of funding for adults who have an autism or fetal alcohol spectrum disorder... Read More →


Thursday December 3, 2015 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Salon B 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

2:20pm

The myths vs. reality of self-contained classrooms for students with intellectual disability
Limited Capacity seats available

This study investigated practices in self-contained high school classrooms serving students with significant cognitive disability. Nineteen students and nine teachers across five high schools participated. A time-sampling method was used to describe the ecological, teacher, and student behaviors of these classrooms. Results revealed students in these classrooms were often passively engaged and had few opportunities to learn from rigorous curriculum. Instructors engaged in few practices known to be effective in supporting the learning of students with significant cognitive disabilities. Finally, the classrooms themselves were often distracting and demonstrated little evidence of specialized or effective instruction. Implications are included. OBJECTIVES: +T2 IMPORTANCE: Educators, families, and policy makers continue to assume that segregated education is beneficial to students with disabilities. Rarely, however, have researchers investigated actual classroom practices; instead, these generally operate with great autonomy and little oversight. By identifying actual practices of self-contained classrooms, we dispel the myths that segregationists rely upon. TRANSLATING TOPIC INTO IMPROVED OUTCOMES:settings, the question then becomes, why are students with SCD not included in general education? Improving self-contained classrooms would likely fail to improve the outcomes of students with SCD for several reasons. First, teacher autonomy and their own segregation in special education classrooms may contribute to teachers not possessing and implementing new knowledge. The observed classrooms were all very segregated from the rest of the school, even in separate building wings. With such isolation, there may not be a perceived need to change practices within self-contained settings. Empirical research looking at science teachers? implementation of changes in practice have identified dissatisfaction with one?s teaching methods and goals as essential for teachers to implement and continue to use new practices (Gess-Newsome, Southerland, Johnstonm & Woodbury, 2003; Feldman, 2000). In the current study, special education teachers expressed satisfaction and confidence in their abilities, which may have been an artifact of their isolation, and would impede their desire to change their practices. Second, however, teacher dissatisfaction is not enough to create and sustain change in practices. For instance, while Gess-Newson et al. (2003) identified teacher dissatisfaction as key to teachers? adoption of new practices, the authors found that supports to overcome structural and institutional barriers were insufficient to sustain change, but were in fact necessary. Specifically related to the issue of teacher time use observed in the current investigation, Vannest et al. (2009) implemented an intervention consisting of progress-monitoring, consultation, and feedback to increase the amount of time special education teachers spent engaging in active instruction. Although teachers agreed with the importance of increasing their instructional time and made small gains, they ultimately articulated institutional barriers, namely paperwork, limited their ability to change practices even though the desire was present. Thus, the isolated nature of self-contained classrooms may itself prevent substantial change from taking place, and, instead, necessitates that efforts to change practice include a movement away from these environments in addition to teacher training. Third, there is mounting evidence of the benefits of including students with the most significant cognitive disabilities in general education. Students taught in self-contained settings do not have full access to the general curriculum due to the nature and extensiveness of their separation from what is taught, how it is taught, and with whom they learn (Kleinert et al., 2015). Indeed, in the current investigation, grade-level curriculum, adapted or otherwise, was rarely observed. Additionally, inclusive classroom settings are associated with increased expressive communication and reading and math skills (Kleinert et al., 2015). However, the lack of instruction and engagement that appears to be taking place in self-contained classrooms is alarming. Finally, general education curriculum settings are the best place to improve participation, membership and access to general education (Jackson, Ryndak, & Wehmeyer, 2008-2009). Ultimately, we must carefully examine whether there is in fact a need for self-contained, segregated settings, and consider the changes that can be undertaken to adequately train teachers and remove barriers associated with greater inclusion for students with significant cognitive disabilities.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer A. Kurth

Jennifer A. Kurth

Asst. Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education


Thursday December 3, 2015 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Mt Hood 1414 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

2:20pm

WI TASH Chapter Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

Join fellow WI residents to plan and reinvent WI TASH annual agents and initiatives.

Speakers
AT

Amy Toson

Assistant Professor, Cardinal Stritch University


Thursday December 3, 2015 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Columbia 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

A public school's progressive approach to socialization, vocation, and secondary educational services.
Limited Capacity seats available

Presentation will look at the programs Community Unity School District 95 in Lake Zurich Illinois has implemented over the past 5 years. Presenters will highlight how programs were implemented and adapted in a public school setting in order to create a continuum of services for transition-aged students. Presenters will highlight numerous socialization opportunities created throughout the community and with neighboring transition programs. Presenters will also describe their community-based vocational program, their college prep programming, as well as their community involvement in trying to create transportation opportunities in their township. OBJECTIVES: 1. plan and implement socialization opportunities for students with disabilities 2. Develop a community based vocational training program with competitive employment outcomes 3. Learn how to work with local Townships on how to create transportation opportunites with no fixed bus routes.


Thursday December 3, 2015 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Columbia 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

Beyond Guardianship: Integrated Community Supports for Decision-Making, Safety & Security
Limited Capacity full

DC law currently commits people with intellectual disabilities to certain community based residential services, taking decision-making rights away from people with IDD and their families, and placing it in the hands of court appointed attorneys. Coupled with this, a number of people with IDD also have guardians who make decisions on their behalf. In response, people with IDD and their families are using an integrated supports approach to develop community-based alternatives and understand what it will take to support people to make as many decisions as they are able to about their lives and support health and safety. .OBJECTIVES: 1. Learn how the National Supporting Families Community of Practice and the National Resource Center on Supported Decision-Making are partnering in DC with the DC Supporting Families Community of Practice to create community-based alternatives to guardianship and civil commitment of people with IDD. 2. Learn about the Integrated Supports Across the LifeCourse approach to supporting people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) and their families. 3. Describe alternatives to guardianship, including supported decision-making. 4. Understand how community connections and friendship not only help improve a person's quality of life, but also help people with IDD stay safe and healthy -- and have the support they need to make decisions about their own lives. 5. Support people with IDD and their families to brainstorm a network of integrated supports around decision-making, health and safety that promote self-determination and supported decision-making.

Speakers
avatar for Erin Leveton

Erin Leveton

Director, State Office of Disability Adminstration, Department on Disability Services
Erin Leveton is the Program Manager of the State Office of Disability Administration at the District of Columbia Department on Disability Services, supporting the agency in policy and legislative affairs, program development, stakeholder relations, and helping DDS to accelerate gains in performance and best practice in areas such as Employment First, Person Centered Thinking, community integration, and self-determination/ supported... Read More →


Thursday December 3, 2015 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Salem 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

Efforts to Improve the Inclusiveness of Faith Communities
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will focus on the experiences of five panelists who will describe their efforts to improve inclusion in faith communities. They will describe efforts to deter the practice of providing segregated classes and programs for persons with disabilities by influencing leadership in faith communities. The presentations will provide a combination of case studies and research studies. OBJECTIVES: As a result of this session, participants will develop strategies for influencing leadership in faith communities to promote inclusion of all persons in faith communities. As a result of this session, participants will be better able to advocate for inclusive environments for all members of a faith community. IMPORTANCE: Persons with disabilities and their families may discover a lack of inclusion in faith communities (Ault, Collins, & Carter, 2013a; Ault et al., 2013b; Ault et al., 2013c); thus, it is important that leaders of faith communities be better educated in inclusive practice and the use of natural supports. TRANSLATING TOPIC INTO NEW OUTCOMES:The presenters will describe their research on inclusiveness in faith communities and will share strategies that they have implemented to educate and better prepare faith community leaders (Baggerman, Ault, Collins, Spriggs, & Slocum, 2015; Collins & Ault, 2010). The research will come from two main contexts: (a) survey research with quantitative and qualitative data on perceptions of inclusiveness by persons with disabilities, their families, and leaders of their faith communities and (b) implementation studies to provide strategies on inclusiveness with faith community leadership.

Speakers
avatar for Erik Carter

Erik Carter

Vanderbilt University, Professor in the Department of Special Education
Erik Carter, PhD, is a Professor in the Department of Special Education at Vanderbilt University and a member of the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center. His research and teaching focuses on evidence-based strategies for supporting inclusion and valued roles in school, work, and community settings for children and adults with severe disabilities. He has published more than 150 articles, chapters, and books in the areas of educational and transition... Read More →
BC

Belva Collins

Department Chair and Professor, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
My background is in severe disabilities and teacher education. My research agenda has focused on systematic instruction for students with disabilities, distance education in teacher preparation, and inclusiveness in faith communities. I retired as professor and chair at the University of Kentucky before coming to UNCC.
avatar for Bree Jimenez

Bree Jimenez

Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Dr. Bree Jimenez is an assistant professor of special education at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Dr. Jimenez has worked in the field of low-incidence disability for over 15 years. Dr. Jimenez designs and conducts research in the area of general curriculum access, specifically in adapted literature, mathematics, and inquiry science. She has published a book and written multiple textbooks chapters surrounding general curriculum... Read More →



Thursday December 3, 2015 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Mt Hood 1414 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

Engaging parents from culturally linguistically diverse communities means beyond translation and interpretation.
Limited Capacity filling up

The US educational and medical system is like a maze for culturally linguistically diverse families to navigate. As parents, we want the best outcomes for our children but due to language barriers, cultural and traditional belief, and even trauma, parents from culturally linguistically diverse (CLD)communities might have hard time to have meaningfully participation in their children?s educational process and medical care plan for their children with disability. It means beyond interpretation and translation. It is TRUST and RELATIONSHIP BUILDING. Effective use of cultural broker can bridge the gap in cross-cultural communication, improving the interconnection between school, families and communities.. OBJECTIVES: 1. Participants will understand the unique perspective of disability and special education from cultural diverse communities 2. Participants will understand how cultural belief can be a factor impeding their service access. 3. Participants will learn the cultural brokering model and how it can be used to effectively to promote parent engagement.

Speakers

Thursday December 3, 2015 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Salon C 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

Inclusive Educational Practices in Oregon SWIFT Partner Schools
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation highlights Oregon schools and districts partnering with SWIFT Center (National Technical Assistance Center for Schoolwide Inclusive School Reform) to bring evidence-based practices to their schools that promote inclusive educational practices. Participating districts are Pendleton, Portland, Redmond, and Sisters. The work of Oregon Department of Education to support districts and schools will also be highlighted. Additionally, SWIFT Domains and Features will be briefly discussed. The presentation aligns to the conference theme by illustrating how Oregon schools are enhancing leadership and teaching capacity to support a more inclusive future for all students. OBJECTIVES: By the end of the session, participants will be able to: a. explain how Oregon partner sites are using evidence-based practices to promote inclusive educational practices b. summarize SWIFT Domains and Features, and c. identify ways Oregon Department of Education is partnering with participating local educational agencies and schools to implement inclusive educational practices using the SWIFT framework.


Thursday December 3, 2015 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Salon D 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

Let's Be Social: How to Successfully Teach Social Skills in Inclusive Preschools
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this presentation is to teach practitioners in the field of early childhood how to create socially meaningful and engaging learning environments for all children. Practitioners will lean how to effectively implement social skills strategies and techniques daily and how to appropriately implement social skills strategies and activities with caregivers and other professionals. Incorporating social skills in inclusive preschool classrooms will not only benefit the early childhood teachers, but also caregivers, therapists, and most importantly the preschool children. OBJECTIVES: After participation in this presentation practitioners will be able to implement effective social skills strategies and techniques in the their classrooms that include: (1) identify the social skill(s) they want to teach, (2) teach social skills concepts during large and small group activities and provide individualized instruction for children who need it, (3) give children opportunities to practice through role play, prompting children through an interaction (scaffolding), and embedding instruction, (4) model the social behaviors/skills in every day interactions, (5) reinforce the social behaviors/skills in context through the use positive descriptive feedback to comment on children engaging in the behavior, and involve children in reflecting on the social skills individually or in a group. Participants will also gain knowledge in data collection and will be presented with a variety of examples of social skills data collection strategies and documentation sheets that they can implement in their classrooms to improve their practice. Practitioners will also gain knowledge on ways to extend the social skills strategies and techniques to caregivers and therapists to implement in other settings.


Thursday December 3, 2015 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Douglas 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

Meaningful Employment for Significant Challenges
Limited Capacity full

When supporting a job-seeker with high support needs, many of the stakeholders often back away from pursuing community employment because they cannot imagine a successful placement without the use of high-cost technology and supervision. In this session, we will focus on meaningful, community-based (and perhaps surprising) jobs across various industries and the utilization of low-cost, low-tech accommodations to meet significant needs and foster confidence, autonomy, and independence. OBJECTIVES: Utilizing accommodations and technology to support individuals on the job -- this is the focus, so demonstrating the use of low-cost accommodations, and utilizing technology that is accessible to all skill levels. Supporting individuals with the most significant disabilities -- the secondary focus of this talk is identifying unique, meaningful jobs found among various industries and some of the low-cost accommodations put in place for successful employment. Effective person-centered planning and assessment -- part of the presentation focuses on reviewing past assessments or volunteer work, as well as person-centered planning and the impact on effective and personalized accommodations. The Breakout Session format will focus on several jobs (community-based, more than minimum wage, 16+ hours/week) performed by individuals with significant needs, and their effective accommodations in various industries (as to be universally applicable to the audience), as well as how those jobs meet employer need. Overall learning objectives include: 1. Greater confidence in supporting individuals with significant needs in job development. 2. Ability to identify barriers to independence and simpler solutions to overcome them. 3. Valuing the resources provided by other stakeholders.

Speakers
avatar for nicholas von pless

nicholas von pless

Supported Employment Manager, Community Access Services
When my team isn't out advocating for employment, you can find me riding my bike, playing guitar and bass in bands around town, brewing beer, or planning my next vacation!


Thursday December 3, 2015 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Sunstone 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

Small Providers, Big Impact: Preparing Providers for the Transition to Managed Care
Limited Capacity filling up

States increasingly are enrolling individuals with intellectual and development disabilities into managed care, which creates new opportunities for small, high-quality and low-overhead providers to partner with health plans to serve and support their shared customers. This session will discuss how small, high-quality and low-overhead providers can prepare best for the introduction of (and potential partnership with) managed care in their states and communities.. OBJECTIVES:1) discuss emerging integrated Long-Term Services and Supports (LTSS) models for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities being pursued by state Medicaid programs, 2) determine early opportunities to engage and build relationships with managed care organizations prior to the introduction of managed care 3) identify meaningful ways to partner with managed care organizations on the design of integrated LTSS models for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities 4) prepare their agencies and staff for potential partnerships, or provider relationships, with managed care organizations

Speakers

Thursday December 3, 2015 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Salon B 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

State of the Art: Knowledge of Current and Emerging Assistive Technology
Limited Capacity seats available

The availability and development of assistive technology (AT) that meets the needs of individuals with severe disabilities is rapidly changing. This presentation will discuss many of the current AT devices, emerging technologies, and strategies for evaluating them. Participants will be asked to share their most useful technologies and ways they keep up with developments. OBJECTIVES: 1. Identify current assistive technology devices appropriate for individuals with varied needs. 2. Access websites and other Internet resources to stay up-to-date with the future technology developments. 3. Collaborate with individuals with disabilities, families, and professionals to match needs with assistive technology.

Speakers
avatar for Craig Miner

Craig Miner

Associate Professor, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville


Thursday December 3, 2015 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Salon G 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

TASH's International Development Activities in Mongolia
Limited Capacity seats available

Briefly describes TASH's international development efforts in Mongolia. TASH and its local partners have been working together to advocate for equity, opportunity, and inclusion since June 2013 and were funded through two different Department of State Programs. Also presents the methodology and preliminary results of two research studies: (1) Focus groups with parents, in urban and rural locations, about their needs and aspirations for their children with disabilities, and (2) Effect of a ten-day professional development session on inclusive education for general teacher training faculty at Institutions of Higher Education on their attitudes toward and their knowledge of the topic. OBJECTIVES: (1) Learn about TASH's international development efforts in Mongolia
(2) Learn about parent's needs and aspirations for their children with disabilities in Mongolia
(3) Learn about the effect of a ten-day professional development session on inclusive education for general teacher training faculty at Institutions of Higher Education in Mongolia on their attitudes toward and their knowledge of the topic

Speakers
avatar for Rima J. Hatoum, Ph.D.

Rima J. Hatoum, Ph.D.

International Development Consultant


Thursday December 3, 2015 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Salmon 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

The Communication Classroom
Limited Capacity seats available

In forty years of progressive leadership, TASH has acted as a voice for those individuals who initially had none. Their participation in the National Joint Committee for the Communication Needs of Persons with Severe Disabilities established a Communication Bill of Rights in 2002. This foundation has facilitated education that encourages and supports communication skills. This proposed session discusses a Communication Classroom developed through a collaborative effort between a speech pathologist and special education teacher. An environment was established with the emphasis on communication through the use of specialized strategies, augmentative communication, family partnership, and community-based instruction. . OBJECTIVES: 1. Participants will be able to name at least 5 ways to set up the classroom environment to encourage communication. 2. Participants will identify ways that communication skills can be practiced/generalized in community based instruction. 3. Participants will discuss ways to encourage the use of the communication strategies in a family partnership. 4. Participants will be able to identify teaching strategies that encourage communication. 5. Participants will identify highly motivating strategies to encourage the use of augmentative communication.

Speakers

Thursday December 3, 2015 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Medford 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

The Right to Respectful Communication Support: Developing a Code of Ethics
Limited Capacity filling up

Communication as a human right is foundational to TASH?s progressive leadership as stated in the Resolution on the Right to Communicate. While enactment of these principles is ever-evolving, individuals who require support to access communication experience inconsistencies in both access to and quality of those supports. This study compiles elements critical to respectful and effective communication support, as described by stakeholders, to establish a professional Code of Ethics that delineates the primary tenets, guiding principles and illustrative behaviors necessary for responsible, respectful and ethical communication support professionals who work with individuals who type to communicate. OBJECTIVES: Understand the central importance of establishing a code of ethics for communication support professionals. - Identify the primary tenets laid out in a communication code of ethics. - Discuss ways to distinguish facilitators? illustrative behaviors and IMPORTANCE: TRANSLATING TOPIC INTO IMPROVED OUTCOMES:

Speakers
KV

Katherine Vroman

Syracuse University
CW

Casey Woodfield

Hussman Institute for Autism
Casey Woodfield is currently an Associate Clinical Researcher at the Hussman Institute for Autism. She earned her Ph.D. in Inclusive and Special Education Program in the Teaching and Leadership department at Syracuse University. She also holds a Master’s degree in Cultural Foundations of Education and a Certificate of Advanced Study in Disability Studies from Syracuse University. Her academic, professional and personal interests most closely... Read More →


Thursday December 3, 2015 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Salon H 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

Using New Federal Policies to Drive Change in Your State
Limited Capacity full

New federal policies have created unprecedented opportunities to transform systems to support real inclusion and integration -- people living in their own homes and working in typical workplaces with real pay -- and to move away from models that congregate people together in residential and day programs where they have little autonomy, choice, and interaction with the broader community. These policies include new rules defining "community" for Medicaid home and community based programs, Olmstead enforcement, and the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. This presentation will focus on how you can use these policies to advocate for change in your state.. OBJECTIVES:* Understand the new HCBS settings rule, the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, and recent Olmstead enforcement activities * Learn about advocacy efforts and changes occurring in states across the country * Identify advocacy opportunities in their home states

Speakers
avatar for Alison Barkoff

Alison Barkoff

Director of Advocacy, Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law
Alison Barkoff is the Director of Advocacy at the Bazelon Center.  She works on policy and litigation related to community integration and inclusion of people with disabilities, including Olmstead, Medicaid, employment, housing, and education.  She is an appointed member of the federal Advisory Committee for Competitive Integrated Employment of People with Disabilities created by the Workforce Innovation Act and an invited member... Read More →
avatar for James Toews

James Toews

Senior Advisor, Administration for Community Living, US Department of Health and Human Services
For  27 years Mr. Toews  worked in the Oregon Department of Human Services administering several of its systems for long term services and support (LTSS),  first as the Director of the Office of Developmental Disability Services, and then for 10 years as the Director of the Seniors and People with Disabilities Division. His Division had responsibility and oversight for all LTSS services including community residential care... Read More →


Thursday December 3, 2015 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Meadowlark 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

Keep the Change
Limited Capacity seats available

An honest and heartfelt love story, starring adults on the autism spectrum.

When an upper-class charmer struggling to hide his autism is forced to attend a support group for people on the autism spectrum, he meets a young woman who challenges his identity as "normal".

KEEP THE CHANGE is a love story written for and starring adults on the autism spectrum. This award winning short film has gone on to inspire a feature length film version starring the same cast that will be coming out soon in 2016.

When an upper-class charmer struggling to hide his autism is forced to attend a support group for people on the autism spectrum, he meets a young woman who challenges his identity as "normal".





Thursday December 3, 2015 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Salon A 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

Employment Committee Meeting
Speakers
avatar for Ruby K Moore

Ruby K Moore

Executive Director, Georgia Advocacy Office
Ruby Moore is the Executive Director of the Georgia Advocacy Office, the designated Protection and Advocacy System for People with Disabilities in Georgia. Moore is nationally known for her work in the disability field over the past 35 years, particularly in the areas of employment, augmentative communication, and the design and implementation of supports necessary for people with significant disabilities to live, work, play, and go to school... Read More →
avatar for Barb Trader

Barb Trader

Executive Director, TASH
Barb Trader is Executive Director of TASH, a progressive advocacy organization that advances inclusion and human rights of people with significant disabilities and complex needs. In her role at TASH, Barb leads APRAIS (Alliance for Prevention of Restraint, Aversive Intervention and Seclusion), a 32-member alliance of national non-profits with a mission to eliminate aversive interventions. She serves on the Board and is treasurer of the... Read More →


Thursday December 3, 2015 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Portland 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

Missouri TASH Chapter Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

Join Missouri TASH members at this meeting! We will be reviewing our action plan, and officially kick off the planning for the next TASH national conference, which will be taking place in St. Louis, Missouri. All midwestern/regional chapters are encouraged and welcome to join.

Speakers

Thursday December 3, 2015 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Pearl 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

NC TASH Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

New NC TASH Officers and planning for future events.


Thursday December 3, 2015 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Eugene 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

AAC Intervention Research Symposium
Limited Capacity seats available

We believe that all people should be afforded the human right to learn to communicate. In this research symposium, you will learn about important developments in AAC intervention research in the following four areas: AAC Immersion, Communication Partner Coaching, Positive Behavior Intervention Supports, and AAC Vocabulary Selection. This symposium is designed to feature a series of concise, cutting edge research talks that researchers will want to experience, but is also to demystify these research topics for a broader audience, because it is that audience who can most make a difference using the lessons from AAC intervention research. Objectives: 1. You will learn to identify current AAC intervention research results. 2. You will learn to identify implications for AAC intervention practice that can be instantly started

Speakers
avatar for Samuel Sennott

Samuel Sennott

Assistant Professor, Universal Design Lab/ Portland State University
Samuel Sennott, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Special Education at Portland State University (PSU). Dr. Sennott is the founder of the new Universal Design Lab at PSU, which is focused on innovative research, teaching, and community service. In summary, his research work focuses on serving individuals with disabilities through using Universal Design for Learning and assistive technologies. Dr. Sennott’s background includes a Master’s... Read More →


Thursday December 3, 2015 3:20pm - 4:10pm
Salon F 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

3:20pm

TASH IDEA Principles for the Future – Forging a Framework for Education Equity
Limited Capacity seats available

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) was signed into law 40 years ago, on November 29th, 1975. It was last reauthorized in 2004. In anticipation of a reauthorization of this important legislation sometime in the next few years, TASH is developing a set of principles that are founded in research with a priority to support practices that best prepare students with significant disabilities for adult life. To prepare for this session, approximately 30 TASH researchers and members have participated in working groups, analyzing the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats posed by current legislative or regulatory language, interpretation or implementation of IDEA 2004. Through this analysis, they have prepared recommendations, backed by research for what a reauthorization should include, addressing the following considerations:

• Assessment
• Enforcement
• Funding
• Teacher preparation
• Administrator preparation
• Transition
• Family Engagement
• Communication
• Instruction
• Personnel utilization
• Research
• Early intervention
• Systems issues and perspectives

This session will provide an opportunity for participants to learn the results of these analyses, review draft principles for IDEA reauthorization, and ask questions and comment on this work. TASH IDEA Reauthorization Principles will be finalized and disseminated in Spring 2016. This session presents an opportunity to be part of the development of these Principles.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer A. Kurth

Jennifer A. Kurth

Asst. Professor, University of Kansas
Inclusive Education
avatar for Lou-Ann Land

Lou-Ann Land

University of Kentucky
JM

Jessica McCord

Educational Consultant, ACERI Partners
avatar for Mary E. Morningstar

Mary E. Morningstar

Dr. Mary E. Morningstar is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Kansas and Director of the Transition Coalition, which offers online, hybrid and in-person professional development and resources for secondary special educators and transition practitioners. Dr. Morningstar also is the Program Director for the Low Incidence teacher education program which trains teachers of students with significant... Read More →
avatar for Clyde  Terry

Clyde Terry

Chair, National Council on Disability
JM

Julia M. White

Assistant Professor, Syracuse University


Thursday December 3, 2015 3:20pm - 5:10pm
Salon I 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:20pm

Adapting Books: Creating Access to Grade Level Content
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this session is to build the capacity of educators to provide high quality instruction for students with disabilities in inclusive settings. The presenters, all educators, will demonstrate (1) how to adapt age appropriate books for students with complex learning needs; and (2) how to use adapted books as a part of effective literacy instruction that increases access to content knowledge and teaches important literacy skills. Audience members will learn how to match the learning needs of their students to specific types of adaptations. Presenters will provide a list of resources to assist in that process. OBJECTIVES: By the end of this session, participants will be able to: (1) explain three ways that adapted grade-level books support learning content and literacy knowledge; (2) summarize a process they can use to adapt grade level books for their students; (3) describe three specific adaptations they can make to grade level books to increase access for their students; (4) name three resources they can use to help adapt grade level materials for their students.

Speakers
avatar for Lauren Weiss

Lauren Weiss

Research Assistant in Educational Specialties, University of New Mexico
Lauren has been working in the fields of applied behavior analysis, education, and behavioral health for over 14 years and is a Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analyst. Throughout various teaching, supervisory, and behavioral health positions. Lauren developed strong skill sets in individualizing curriculum and implementing behavioral supports while working with individuals with learning differences (IDD, ASD, ADHD, FAS/FASD). Lauren is... Read More →


Thursday December 3, 2015 4:20pm - 5:10pm
Columbia 1402 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

4:20pm