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This year’s theme, “Celebrating 40 Years of Progressive Leadership,” acknowledges TASH’s 40 years of generating change within the disability community and anticipates a brighter, more inclusive future for people with disabilities in all aspects of life. Each year, the TASH Conference impacts the disability field by connecting attendees to innovative information and resources, facilitating connections between stakeholders within the disability movement, and helping attendees reignite their passion for an inclusive world.

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Thursday, December 3 • 1:20pm - 2:10pm
What promotes independent living? FILLING

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This study will identify ways schools and families can support youth?s transition to adulthood in terms of independent living. We will look at outcomes of youth from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds and levels of disability. We will develop a model for understanding the role of different factors and their effect on people with disabilities? ability to live independently by using nationally representative data from the NLTS2. OBJECTIVES: After this session, participants will: a) know which factors impact postsecondary living b) know how youth fair off in terms of postsecondary living when background (cultural and linguistic) factors are taken into consideration c) know how youth fair off in terms of postsecondary living when the severity of disability is taken into consideration d) know how to best support youth to achieve positive postsecondary living outcomes IMPORTANCE: Independent living is one of the most significant markers for successful transition to adulthood for students with disabilities (Wehmeyer & Palmer, 2003), and is considered to a primary goal of special education (Newman et al., 2011). It is also the best measure to assess community participation of people with disabilities. TRANSLATING TOPIC INTO NEW OUTCOMES:This study aims to identify the ways schools and families can support students during high school to achieve better independent living outcomes during their adulthood. Specifically, we will develop a model for understanding the role of different factors and their effect on people with disabilities? ability to live independently by using nationally representative data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2 (NLTS2). The model will investigate the impact of various factors (parents? and students? expectations for postsecondary lives, training in independent living, participation in leadership and community activities, having a paid job, time spent in general education, and how much youth felt they relied on others) on the living status after finishing high school, while controlling for gender, age, and disability. These variables have been previously linked to successful transition outcomes in terms of employment and postsecondary education, and there is evidence indicating that some might be moderately linked to successful transition to independent living (Test et al., 2009). Results will be used to make recommendations for training teachers and families to best support students in achieving better independent living outcomes. Because this is a large, nationally representative sample, our results are also conducive to making policy and best practices recommendations.

Speakers
avatar for Irina Cain

Irina Cain

Doctoral Candidate, Virginia Commonwealth University


Thursday December 3, 2015 1:20pm - 2:10pm
Eugene 1401 SW Naito Parkway Portland, OR 97201

Attendees (28)